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Teachers are doing their best, but they’re at the breaking point

Teachers are doing their best, but they’re at the breaking point

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Jan 7th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, the past year has been hard on all of us—but especially for those to whom we entrust our children. From a rush to online learning with schools closed, to a hasty back-to-school plan that was followed by rising COVID-19 numbers in schools, to the uncertainty of not knowing when or how they’ll be able to teach their students this winter…many educators are close to giving up.

How can we keep our education system functioning while also protecting our kids, our families and the people we need to teach them? What have we learned about our education system that could help us adapt in the future? And what happens to it if enough teachers decide they simply can’t take it anymore, and leave the public system for private schools?

GUEST: Inori Roy

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

People’s Party leader and former MP Maxime Bernier travelled to Florida last fall

STEPHANIE LEVITZ, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jan 6th, 2021

OTTAWA — The one-time Conservative cabinet minister and MP who broke ranks to form his own political party is among the Canadians who’ve headed south in recent months.

Maxime Bernier, who leads the libertarian People’s Party of Canada, went to Florida in November with his wife for a vacation.

A spokesman says the pair did quarantine for the full 14 days required when they returned.

Bernier has been vocal in his disagreement with COVID-19 lockdown measures, including restrictions on travel.

In recent days, he’s used social media to berate the politicians who’ve been caught flouting public health warnings and heading abroad, accusing them of being hypocrites.

Bernier says the issue shouldn’t be that they travelled but that they agreed with the restrictions in the first place, and then broke them.

Several federal members of Parliament, at least one senator, and provincial politicians have been outed for taking trips outside Canada in the last few months despite the fact public health and government leaders have been urging everyone to stay home.

The senator, Conservative Don Plett, was a longtime caucus colleague of Bernier’s, but that didn’t stop the former MP from the Quebec riding of Beauce for castigating him on social media this week.

“Another moron,” Bernier wrote.

“Let me make this very clear: The problem is NOT that they travelled abroad. It’s that they publicly agree with the silly authoritarian rules imposed on Canadians AND THEN FLOUT THEM.”

Bernier was a Conservative MP from 2006 until he quit the party in 2018, following his razor-thin loss in the party’s leadership race the previous year.

He then formed his own party, arguing the conservative movement in Canada was moving too far to the centre.

While the People’s Party ran candidates across the country in the 2019 federal election, none — including Bernier — was elected.

He tried again in a federal byelection earlier this year in a Toronto riding, but lost to the Liberals.

Bernier’s approach to the pandemic has mirrored that of other populist, right-wing politicians around the world.

He’s been strongly against lockdowns, arguing they are a violation of people’s rights and do more harm than good, and he also attended at least one anti-mask rally, though photos from the event show him with a mask, just tucked under his chin.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 5, 2021.

Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard to apply for bail in Winnipeg

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jan 6th, 2021

WINNIPEG — Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard is expected to seek bail today following his arrest in Winnipeg last month over charges he faces in the United States of using his influence to lure women and girls for sex.

Nygard, who is 79, was arrested in December under the Extradition Act and faces nine counts in the southern District of New York, including racketeering and sex trafficking.

Documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office allege Nygard frequently targeted women and underage girls from disadvantaged economic backgrounds with promises of modelling and other financial opportunities.

They allege the criminal conduct occurred over 25 years and involved dozens of women in the United States, the Bahamas and Canada, among other locations.

Nygard’s lawyer, Jay Prober, has said his client denies all the allegations.

Prober had said he would pursue bail because of concerns over Nygard’s health behind bars.

The U.S. indictment alleges Nygard forcibly sexually assaulted many women and girls, some who were between 14 and 17 years old. It alleges others were forcibly assaulted by Nygard’s associates or drugged to ensure their compliance with his sexual demands.

Nygard stepped down as chairman of his company after the FBI and police raided his offices in New York City in February.

The fashion mogul is also the subject of a class-action lawsuit in the U.S. with similar allegations involving 57 women, including 18 Canadians. It alleges Nygard used violence, intimidation, bribery and company employees to lure victims and avoid accountability for decades.

The lawsuit was put on pause in August. While reasons for the stay in the suit were sealed, the court docket said it resulted from a government motion that named three federal prosecutors — an indication the criminal investigation was proceeding.

Two of Nygard’s sons filed a separate lawsuit against him months later claiming they were statutorily raped at his direction when they were teens. The sons allege Nygard arranged for a woman to have sex with them.

Nygard has said through his lawyer that he denies all the allegations in the lawsuits. He has blamed the accusations on a feud with his billionaire neighbour in the Bahamas.

Nygard came to Canada as a child from Finland with his parents in 1942. He founded his fashion company in Winnipeg in 1967 and it grew to become a brand name sold in stores around the world.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 6, 2021.

The Canadian Press

New Brunswick RCMP issue alert warning residents about armed man wanted for shooting

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jan 6th, 2021

MONCTON, N.B. — Police in New Brunswick are warning residents about a man carrying firearms who is wanted for a shooting Tuesday near a high school in Riverview.

The RCMP have distributed an Alert Ready message to the greater Moncton area, saying 24-year-old Janson Bryan Baker intends to use the firearms.

Baker is described as 5-foot-9, 145 pounds, with short brown hair, brown eyes and tattoos on his neck, right cheek and forehead.

The Mounties say he is believed to be driving a black 2020 Hyundai Elantra with black tinted windows.

Police say Baker should not be approached.

Shortly after the shooting near Riverview High School was reported Tuesday at 5:15 p.m., a man was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 6, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How the Georgia Senate runoffs could impact Canada

CARYN CEOLIN | posted Tuesday, Jan 5th, 2021

Political observers are casting Georgia’s Senate runoff elections as pivotal to U.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s ability to make decisions that will affect the entire United States, and in some cases, the entire world.

“It’s about literally life or death for communities all across this country,” said Democratic strategist Antjuan Seawright. “Because if Joe Biden and Kamala Harris do not have a collective Congress to help them pass necessary legislation that will move this country forward, what are we going to be able to do?”

On Tuesday, Georgians will cast their ballots for the state’s two outstanding Senate seats. The outcome will decide which party will have the upper hand in the upper chamber.

Seawright tells 680 NEWS the stakes include whether laws get passed, potentially boosting Biden’s policy priorities, both domestic and foreign.

“That’s why you see so much attention around Georgia and making certain people understand how high the stakes are,” he said.

Democrats have a president in the White House and run the House of Representatives. Republicans currently control the Senate. A Democratic sweep in the runoffs would lead to a 50-50 split, in which case, tie-breaking votes would go to Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

Sarah Goldfeder, a former U.S. diplomat under two American ambassadors, is in favour of a gridlocked Congress.

“I do think having a tight government, having very tight margins in the House and very tight margins in the Senate are better for government and better for America overall,” she said.

Whoever wins will hold only a slim Senate margin, says Goldfeder, now an Ottawa-based consultant. That will make it harder to implement significant legislative changes.

“In many ways you can think of it like a minority government here in Canada. They have to negotiate,” she said. “If the Republicans want something or the Democrats want something, they’re going to have to win over their more moderate members.”

Regardless of what happens Tuesday, Seawright says these races will shape the coming years in U.S. politics.

“This election in Georgia is about who will be able to govern effectively and get things done for the collective United States of America,” he said.

Nearly half of Canadians visited friends, family over holidays, new poll suggests

STEPHANIE LEVITZ, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jan 5th, 2021

A new survey suggests nearly half of Canadians visited with family or friends over the winter holiday period.

The Leger/Association for Canadian Studies poll found 48 per cent of those surveyed visited with people outside their households, compared to 52 per cent who said they did not.

Public health officials had pleaded with Canadians to sharply limit their contacts during the holidays to avoid massive spikes in COVID-19 cases.

But it appears something gave for Canadians, said Leger vice-president Christian Bourque.

“Usually we Canadians are sort of much more, I would say, disciplined when it comes to going by what governments are recommending in terms of our behaviour, but over the holidays, apparently, it was sort of tougher on Canadians,” he said.

Of those who did visit with friends or family outside their homes, 34 per cent did once, 12 per cent did two or three times, and two per cent did it often.

COVID-19 case numbers are rising, and the poll suggests 62 per cent surveyed have little to no confidence in Canada’s ability to limit the spread of COVID-19 over the next few weeks.

That pessimism is notable, considering that before the holidays, polls suggested Canadians were feeling optimistic about 2021, Bourque said.

But stories in the waning days of 2020 about delays in vaccine rollouts, climbing case counts and news that many politicians left the country over the holidays despite limits on travel, seem to be turning Canadians’ moods, he said.

“I think it’s gotten people to be more skeptical about how much we can do in the short term,” he said.

Throughout the pandemic, Leger has asked Canadians about their mental health, and Bourque said the latest round of responses reflect a downturn: in the most recent survey, only 33 per cent rated their mental health as good, the lowest figure yet, he said.

“January is set up to be a bit gloomy,” he said.

Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies carried out the survey of 1,506 Canadians between Dec. 30, 2020 and Jan. 3, 2021.

The poll was conducted online, and cannot be assigned a margin of error as online surveys aren’t considered truly random.

As pollsters were asking the questions, news reports surfaced of politicians, including Ontario’s finance minister, several federal MPs and provincial politicians in Alberta, among others, taking trips outside the country in recent months.

That’s in spite of repeated warnings from local and national governments, as well as public health officials, that travel should be limited only to essential trips.

In the survey, 87 per cent of those asked said they would support a total ban on international travel until there are several consecutive days of reduced numbers of COVID-19 cases

Bourque said that number is consistent with similar questions asked throughout the pandemic, but also reflects a growing desire by Canadians for governments to take concrete action to try to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The federal government has said only a small fraction of the active cases in Canada can be directly linked to recent travel, though it did ban incoming flights from the United Kingdom after a new variant of COVID-19 that is believed to be more contagious surfaced there late last year.

Families of downed Ukrainian flight 752 victims struggle with loss a year later

BY LIAM CASEY AND HINA ALAM, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jan 5th, 2021

A broken cellphone and a muddied wallet were the only possessions Alireza Ghandchi received from Iran after his wife and two children were killed in a Ukrainian plane crash last year.

“No luggage, no dolls, no anything,” he said.

His son, Daniel, was eight-years-old and his daughter, Dorsa, was just three days shy of turning 16. The family from Richmond Hill, Ont., was returning home after spending the holidays in Iran when their plane — Ukraine International Airlines flight PS752 — was shot down by the Iranian army.

Ghandchi says his last conversation was with his daughter about 90 minutes before the flight while his wife, Faezeh, was checking in.

Everything was fine, Dorsa told him.

Now, pictures of his family fill his walls and memories of them fill his heart. When it gets overwhelming, Ghandchi goes into his storage, smells his wife’s perfume, hugs his children’s clothes and cries.

Ghandchi says there are times when nothing at all can help him with the grief of losing his entire family.

All 176 passengers on board the Ukraine passenger jet died in the crash on Jan. 8, 2020. There were 138 people on board with ties to Canada.

A year later, families cling to memories of their lost loved ones along with a few mementoes they received from the Iranian authorities.

Not all of the passengers’ personal possessions were destroyed in the crash. There were reports of looting at the site of the crash and some of the victims’ families have accused Iranian authorities of withholding valuable items such as jewelry, cellphones and cash.

Ralph Goodale, who is Ottawa’s special adviser on the Ukrainian plane crash, blasted Iran in a recent report for its treatment of the victims’ families, including the “withholding of personal effects.”

For Amirali Alavi, who lost his mother, Neda Sadighi, in the tragedy, the past year has been “one devastating blow after another.”

He received her pristine boarding pass, a few crumpled rings, a destroyed laptop, a few credit cards and identification — but no wallet, no luggage, no carry-on. Most of her jewelry was missing as was the cash she carried.

“Some of these things don’t have monetary value, but they have a lot of sentimental value to the families,” Alavi said. “It feels like psychological warfare.”

Alavi is not alone.

Several other families say they’ve received little to nothing of their loved ones’ possessions back from Iran, which further compounds their grief.

Most of the relatives have banded together to form the Association of Families of Flight PS752 Victims. With contacts throughout Iran, they’re doing their own investigation, Alavi said.

They’ve unearthed video of the crash site that shows officials going through passengers’ bags and sorting them into bins, he said.

“They’re separating the contents, taking them out without any effort of preserving them and tossing the bags in one box, belongings in the other box,” Alavi said.

“Nobody knows what happened to them.”

He said one family got back a laptop without its hard drive, while another received a leather bracelet without its gold pieces.

Tensions were running high on the day the Ukrainian plane was downed.

Hours before the crash, Iran launched an attack on U.S. military forces at two airbases in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Qasem Soleimani, a feared general and head of the Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard.

Alavi, a law and business student at the University of Toronto, watched an online flight tracker as PS752 took off at 6:12 a.m. Tehran time, more than an hour late from its scheduled departure time. He felt a sense of relief when the site showed the plane making its way into Azerbaijan airspace.

He was excited to have his mother back. In 2010, Sadighi, an ophthalmologist, gave up her practice in Iran and moved to Canada with her husband, Farzad Alavi, a doctor, hoping for a better life for their son.

The tracking site Alavi watched that night was wrong. Six minutes after takeoff, the plane was hit by ground-to-air missiles and crashed into a children’s playground.

Iran said the takedown was human error, which many families do not believe.

Mahmoud Zibaie also tracked the flight online. He even took a video of the tracking technology to later show it to his computer-savvy 15-year-old daughter, Maya, who was on the plane with his wife, Shahrzad Hashemi.

A few minutes after takeoff, he left to brew some tea. By the time he returned to his computer, the plane had vanished from the screen. He soon saw reports of the crash on social media.

His pain and anguish remain fresh and he is overwhelmed at times by feelings of guilt. Zibaie was supposed to be on that plane with his family, but he came home a few days earlier because he worried about taking too much time off from his new job.

“It’s very, very, very tough still, the wound is fresh. And I believe that it will take a very long time to heal,” he said.

Like several other families, Zibaie has channelled much of his grief towards building a school in an impoverished part of Iran.

Zibaie still looks at Maya’s first email she sent when she was four years old — a painting she made on the computer — for comfort. His wife was a decorative painter and his daughter had inherited her talents.

He applied to immigrate to Canada in 2006 when Maya was two years old. They landed in Toronto in 2016. Four years later, he buried his wife and daughter in Tehran.

Zibaie found he could no longer live in the same home in Toronto so he moved to Ottawa.

“Every place I went was a memory,” he said. “It was too hard.”

He, too, wishes for more of his family’s belongings back.

He has gotten back his daughter’s burned passport and some of his wife’s banking cards.

“That’s all I’ve gotten back,” he said. “It hurts.”

Arman Abtahi was relieved when his brother’s remains arrived in a sealed coffin so the last memory of him would be of the final time the family had seen him — smiling and waving goodbye.

He had hoped the Iranian authorities would send back his brother’s ring so their mother could have something of her 37-year-old son.

“We didn’t get back anything,” he said. “Not his luggage, not his watch, not his ring, we just got his body.”

Abtahi’s brother was a postdoctoral scholar at the University of British Columbia. He had gone to Iran to celebrate his first wedding anniversary because his wife’s visa to Canada was rejected.

The last thing Abtahi told his brother was that he would pick him up at the airport.

“Instead, I went to the airport to go back to Iran to bury him,” he said.

Bail hearing scheduled today for teens accused in death of Calgary police officer

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jan 4th, 2021

CALGARY — Two teens charged with first-degree murder in the death of a Calgary police officer are due in court today for a bail hearing.

The accused — 19-year-old Amir Abdulrahman and a 17-year-old boy — were arrested on Friday afternoon after turning themselves in.

They had been wanted in the death of 37-year-old Sgt. Andrew Harnett, who was killed while conducting a traffic stop on New Year’s Eve.

Calgary police have said Harnett pulled over an SUV, which then struck and killed him.

They’ve alleged the younger of the two accused was behind the wheel, while they say Abdulrahman was a passenger.

The pair had their first court appearance on Saturday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 4, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Helicopter crash victims identified as parents, two children in family of seven

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jan 4th, 2021

DEBOLT, Alta. — Four people who died in a helicopter crash on New Year’s Day are being identified by loved ones as members of a strong and loving farm family from a small community in northern Alberta.

The families of 45-year-old Wade Balisky and 37-year-old Aubrey Balisky say in a joint statement that they are grappling with the loss of the couple and two of their children, eight-year-old Jewel and two-year-old Fleur.

The family says Wade and Aubrey are survived by their three other children, 16-year-old Chevey, 14-year-old Remington and 12-year-old Indya.

The family lived together in the small farming community of DeBolt, Alta., about 45 kilometres east of Grande Prairie.

RCMP have said emergency responders received an emergency signal from a Robinson R44 helicopter and arrived to find the aircraft crashed in a field in nearby Birch Hills county with no survivors.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

“We have been devastated by our sudden loss of Wade, Aubrey, Jewel and Fleur,” the Balisky and Warkentin families said in a joint statement.

“Chevey, Remington and Indya will need your prayers, love and support as they grapple with the loss of their father, mother and sisters. They know that they were loved and are loved.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 3, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, Jan. 4, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jan 4th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Monday Jan. 4, 2021.

There are 601,663 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 601,663 confirmed cases (80,822 active, 504,976 resolved, 15,865 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 6,578 new cases Sunday from 50,584 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 13 per cent. The rate of active cases is 215.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 48,389 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 6,913.

There were 41 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 757 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 108. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.29 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 42.21 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,041,448 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 390 confirmed cases (12 active, 374 resolved, four deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday from 260 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 2.3 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 73,148 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 96 confirmed cases (six active, 90 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday from 217 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 3.82 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 80,395 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,499 confirmed cases (27 active, 1,407 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday from 617 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 2.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 34 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is five.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.69 per 100,000 people.

There have been 181,051 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 618 confirmed cases (42 active, 567 resolved, nine deaths).

There were seven new cases Sunday from 215 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 3.3 per cent. The rate of active cases is 5.41 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 26 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.02 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 1.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 116,049 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 210,304 confirmed cases (22,501 active, 179,456 resolved, 8,347 deaths).

There were 2,869 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 265.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 17,649 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,521.

There were 11 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 324 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 46. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.55 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 98.37 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,507,746 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 190,962 confirmed cases (23,611 active, 162,701 resolved, 4,650 deaths).

There were 2,964 new cases Sunday from 48,175 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 6.2 per cent. The rate of active cases is 162.09 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19,546 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,792.

There were 25 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 273 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 39. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.27 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 31.92 per 100,000 people.

There have been 7,838,837 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 25,126 confirmed cases (4,461 active, 19,982 resolved, 683 deaths).

There were 100 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 325.75 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 981 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 140.

There were five new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 38 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.4 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.87 per 100,000 people.

There have been 409,113 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 16,083 confirmed cases (2,841 active, 13,084 resolved, 158 deaths).

There were 238 new cases Sunday from 1,017 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 23 per cent. The rate of active cases is 241.9 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,269 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 181.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 13.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 305,692 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 104,228 confirmed cases (18,355 active, 84,827 resolved, 1,046 deaths).

There were an estimated 400 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 419.9 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 6,876 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 982.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 64 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 23.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,547,298 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 51,990 confirmed cases (8,962 active, 42,127 resolved, 901 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 176.72 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,998 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 285.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 40 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is six. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 17.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 962,565 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 64 confirmed cases (four active, 59 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 9.79 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 5,927 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 24 confirmed cases (zero active, 24 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 7,906 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 266 confirmed cases (zero active, 265 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday from 83 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.58 per 100,000 people.

There have been 5,645 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Jan. 4, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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