1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Latest Posts

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Wednesday, April 14, 2021

The Canadian Press | posted Wednesday, Apr 14th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 14, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 269,702 new vaccinations administered for a total of 8,598,270 doses given. Nationwide, 829,067 people or 2.2 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 22,687.161 per 100,000.

There were 308,300 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 11,411,202 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 75.35 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 21,762 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 112,337 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 214.535 per 1,000. In the province, 1.85 per cent (9,674) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 144,700 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 28 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 77.63 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 7,645 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 35,093 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 221.227 per 1,000. In the province, 5.52 per cent (8,764) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 44,265 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 28 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 79.28 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 41,154 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 157,590 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 161.482 per 1,000. In the province, 3.21 per cent (31,294) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 264,790 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 27 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 59.52 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 37,541 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 161,663 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 207.25 per 1,000. In the province, 2.04 per cent (15,907) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 211,545 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 27 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 76.42 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 60,229 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,005,106 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 234.333 per 1,000. There were 203,580 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 2,640,267 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 31 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 75.94 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 95,692 new vaccinations administered for a total of 3,310,157 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 225.348 per 1,000. In the province, 2.28 per cent (335,262) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 4,506,495 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 31 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 73.45 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 6,509 new vaccinations administered for a total of 291,152 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 211.439 per 1,000. In the province, 4.97 per cent (68,502) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 409,470 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 30 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 71.1 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 7,846 new vaccinations administered for a total of 298,767 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 253.374 per 1,000. In the province, 3.55 per cent (41,821) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 9,800 new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 341,785 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 29 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 87.41 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 38,014 new vaccinations administered for a total of 970,272 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 220.414 per 1,000. In the province, 4.23 per cent (186,156) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 1,208,955 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 27 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.26 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 36,892 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,148,993 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 223.907 per 1,000. In the province, 1.71 per cent (87,785) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 94,920 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 1,498,430 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 29 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 76.68 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 836 new vaccinations administered for a total of 42,354 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,014.929 per 1,000. In the territory, 42.30 per cent (17,653) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 51,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 82.4 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 41,217 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 913.518 per 1,000. In the territory, 36.51 per cent (16,471) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 51,600 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 110 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 79.88 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 373 new vaccinations administered for a total of 23,569 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 608.609 per 1,000. In the territory, 25.25 per cent (9,778) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 37,500 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 97 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 62.85 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 14, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, April 14, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Apr 14th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 14, 2021.

There are 1,078,562 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 1,078,562 confirmed cases (78,293 active, 976,877 resolved, 23,392 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 7,548 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 206.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 57,669 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 8,238.

There were 36 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 251 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 36. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 61.55 per 100,000 people.

There have been 29,251,338 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,031 confirmed cases (15 active, 1,010 resolved, six deaths).

There was one new case Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.87 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 11 new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 228,184 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 165 confirmed cases (six active, 159 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 3.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 131,383 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,781 confirmed cases (45 active, 1,670 resolved, 66 deaths).

There were six new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 4.59 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 34 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is five.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 452,860 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,736 confirmed cases (133 active, 1,570 resolved, 33 deaths).

There were four new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 17.02 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 71 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 10.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.05 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.22 per 100,000 people.

There have been 277,442 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 329,472 confirmed cases (13,253 active, 305,463 resolved, 10,756 deaths).

There were 1,490 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 154.56 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 10,940 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,563.

There were 12 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 55 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is eight. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 125.44 per 100,000 people.

There have been 7,599,386 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 394,679 confirmed cases (35,840 active, 351,257 resolved, 7,582 deaths).

There were 3,670 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 243.25 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 27,077 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,868.

There were 15 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 124 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 18. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 51.46 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,045,154 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 35,459 confirmed cases (1,438 active, 33,070 resolved, 951 deaths).

There were 135 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 104.26 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 912 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 130.

There were two new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of nine new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 68.95 per 100,000 people.

There have been 615,454 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 36,892 confirmed cases (2,555 active, 33,880 resolved, 457 deaths).

There were 288 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 216.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,910 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 273.

There were two new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 14 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.17 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 38.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 705,758 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 163,119 confirmed cases (15,087 active, 146,011 resolved, 2,021 deaths).

There were 1,081 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 341.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 8,994 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,285.

There were three new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 20 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 45.7 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,851,400 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 113,702 confirmed cases (9,919 active, 102,268 resolved, 1,515 deaths).

There were 873 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 192.69 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,714 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,102.

There were two new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 26 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 29.43 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,308,820 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 75 confirmed cases (one active, 73 resolved, one death).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.38 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,690 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 43 confirmed cases (one active, 42 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 16,683 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 10,048 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 14, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canada had a blueprint for an amazing health data system. We never built it.

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, Apr 14th, 2021

n today’s Big Story podcast, in the late 1990s, it became clear that Canada’s health data systems would need to go digital. A thorough report was presented, the first of many to come, laying out what needed to happen for Canada to lead the world in digital health data. A national data system would track everything from outbreaks and symptoms to vaccinations and side effects. But…we never built it. Over the next 20-plus years, little was done—and nothing at all from a truly national level.

Now, when we desperately need to be able to have access to real-time data on what’s happening where, every province relies on a different system, and many of them are duct-taped together from the bones of what was supposed to be a world-leading piece of infrastructure. What happened?

GUEST: Justin Ling (Read Justin’s reporting here.)

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

 

How J&J and AstraZeneca differ from the mRNA vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna

MELISSA COUTO ZUBER, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Apr 13th, 2021

Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose COVID-19 vaccine has hit a stumbling block in the United States as regulators begin investigating reports of blood clots, weeks before the first shipment of the jabs are expected to arrive in Canada.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday they were investigating clots in six women that occurred in the days after vaccination. The agencies are recommending pausing the use of the Johnson & Johnson jab in the country.

It’s the second COVID vaccine to be investigated for a possible link to blood clotting after several European countries temporarily halted use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine for the same reason last month.

Canada approved the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in early March, but manufacturing issues have delayed shipments. The country is scheduled to get its first batch at the end of this month.

Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday it was delaying rolling out its vaccine in Europe amid the U.S. investigation.

The reports from Johnson & Johnson recipients appear similar to the rare type of clotting disorder that European authorities said last week is possibly linked to AstraZeneca. The European Medicines Agency has said the benefits of receiving the AstraZeneca jab outweigh the potential risks.

More than 6.8 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine have been administered in the U.S., with the vast majority reporting no or mild side effects.

Both Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca use the same vaccine technology, which differs from the mRNA vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

Here’s how the four vaccines work:

VIRAL VECTORS

All of the approved COVID-19 vaccines train the body to recognize the spike protein that coats the outer surface of the coronavirus.

Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca use a harmless version of a cold virus as a vector to give our cells the instructions they need to make the coronavirus’s spike protein.

The immune system recognizes the protein and makes antibodies, which then allow us to fend off attack if exposed in the future.

Johnson & Johnson uses a human adenovirus, or a cold virus, to create its vaccine while AstraZeneca uses a chimpanzee version.

Johnson & Johnson’s is the first single-dose vaccine approved in Canada. AstraZeneca, like Pfizer and Moderna, requires two doses.

Experts say it takes a couple weeks for the body to build up some level of immunity with any of the vaccines.

MESSENGER RNA VACCINES

Moderna and Pfizer use messenger RNA (mRNA), a novel technology that essentially teaches our cells how to produce the coronavirus’s spike protein. That triggers an immune response if we become infected with the virus in the future.

All four of the vaccines basically work the same way, but there’s one less component involved with the mRNA versions. Whereas the viral vectors use another virus to give our cells the info they need to make the spike protein, mRNA dumps the genetic code in directly, without using another virus as a vessel.

Pfizer and Moderna use synthetically-produced mRNA that’s packaged in a fat coating. The mRNA is dumped into the cell when the vaccine is injected into the arm muscle and it then translated into protein to make the antibody.

The vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna were the first inoculations approved for humans to use mRNA, but the technology was being worked on for decades before it was adapted to vaccine creation.

Previous research had been done on creating mRNA vaccines against Zika and other viruses, and there were earlier efforts focused on cancer treatments.

Early pitfalls against the mRNA technology was that it was too unstable and fragile, with the mRNA disintegrating upon entering the body. That problem was solved by packaging it in the fat coating, giving it something to help bind onto cells easier.

— With files from The Associated Press

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 13, 2021.

Melissa Couto Zuber, The Canadian Press

RCMP under scrutiny one year after mass killing that left 22 dead in Nova Scotia

MICHAEL MACDONALD, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Apr 13th, 2021

HALIFAX — In the 12 months since a man disguised as a Mountie murdered 22 people in rural Nova Scotia, the RCMP’s handling of the horrific case has come under intense scrutiny.

Through the intermittent disclosure of heavily redacted files, the RCMP and the Crown have gradually divulged a narrative that raises questions about why it took police 13 hours to stop one of the worst mass killings in Canadian history.

Wayne MacKay, a law professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, says the glacial pace of the RCMP’s investigation and their reluctance to release search warrant applications does not reflect well on the Mounties.

“They seem particularly reluctant to reveal too much … because they fear that it will reveal they haven’t approached the case in an ideal way,” MacKay said in an interview. “The approach of the RCMP and their slow release of information to date is troubling.”

In the past year, several media organizations have launched court challenges to gain access to search warrant applications, and a police watchdog agency has also shed light on the RCMP’s actions.

Last December, for example, the Crown released a partially redacted application that described what officers saw as they arrived in Portapique, N.S., to investigate complaints of shots being fired late on April 18, 2020.

The document, known as an information to obtain or ITO, describes how a witness wounded by gunfire told the first officers on the scene that his neighbour, 51-year-old Gabriel Wortman, had been shooting people while dressed as a Mountie and driving a replica police car.

The witness, whose name is blacked out, said the vehicle in question was “almost identical to the police cars that showed up on the scene.”

The man’s observations are significant because they confirm the Mounties were informed of the killer’s disguise and his replica vehicle early in their response to the shootings and a string of deliberately set fires, which left 13 people dead in Portapique.

The Mounties, however, did not issue a public alert about the vehicle on Twitter until 10:17 a.m. the next day.

MacKay said the only plausible explanation for the delay is that the RCMP had mistakenly concluded the suspect had died the night before.

“It’s evidence of a fairly chaotic response to the tragedy,” MacKay said. “They seemed to believe that he either shot himself or had died in one of the fires …. They were operating on a false premise that the risk had passed.”

The RCMP last week declined to comment on the case, saying the police force will be participating in an upcoming federal-provincial inquiry. But early in their investigation, the Mounties argued they couldn’t divulge anything that might compromise a criminal probe that could lead to a trial.

Christian Leuprecht, a professor at the Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., who specializes in police and security issues, said the shear complexity of a case is a complicating factor, given that it involves 435 witnesses and 16 crime scenes.

“The approach is always one of caution,” he said.

Details regarding another key piece of evidence emerged in December when the Crown released a document that confirmed the RCMP knew exactly where the killer was when they received a 911 call from a home in Glenholme, N.S., at around 9:45 a.m. on April 19, 2020.

The couple inside the home told police that Wortman — whom they knew from a previous visit — was dressed as a Mountie and driving a replica police car. They said he had knocked on the door and, in an apparent attempt to trick the couple, yelled: “Come out with your hands up, Gabriel! Come out with your hands up!”

The couple didn’t respond, and the killer left.

At that point, the Mounties thought they had the shooter cornered, but he escaped. Having already killed four people that morning, he would go on to kill another five people, including RCMP Const. Heidi Stevenson.

RCMP Supt. Darren Campbell, speaking at news conference on June 4, said one responding officer unknowingly passed the suspect on the road. “We actually missed that gunman by minutes,” Campbell said at the time.

After that, the RCMP lost track of the killer, though they posted a tweet saying they believed he was in the Onslow-Debert area at 10:21 a.m.

The manhunt then took a disturbing turn when two RCMP officers mistakenly thought they had spotted the shooter standing next to an RCMP cruiser near the firehall in Onslow, about 95 kilometres north of Halifax.

According to a report from Nova Scotia’s police watchdog, the man in question was wearing an orange, reflective vest, which matched the police description of the suspect’s clothing.

When the officers tried to alert their superiors via their two-way radio, they couldn’t reach anyone because the channels were jammed, the report from Serious Incident Response Team said.

“The sole reason why (the officer) was unable to transmit what they were seeing was because there was no available talk path due to the heavy volume of radio traffic,” the report says.

As the two officers got out of their vehicle and raised their rifles, one of them yelled, “Police! Show your hands!”

They opened fire when the man ducked behind the car and ran toward the firehall. One officer fired four shots and the other a single shot. No one was injured — but some of the slugs ripped into the firehall, narrowly missing firefighters and members of the public seeking shelter.

“The degree of poor management and poor communication is really astounding,” MacKay said. “The leadership seems to be questionable, too.”

The watchdog agency later cleared the officers of criminal wrongdoing, saying the “totality of the evidence” led the officers to believe it was the killer standing by the firehall.

The Onslow Belmont Fire Brigade posted a statement on its Facebook page last month, saying it remains “frustrated and disappointed that there will be no accountability for the RCMP. Their actions that day endangered lives, damaged property and caused mental health issues for many of the people involved.”

In all, the killer travelled more than 150 kilometres before he was fatally shot by two RCMP officers who recognized him when he pulled into a gas station about 30 kilometres north of Halifax, driving a car stolen from his last victim. Another report from the police watchdog made it clear this was a chance encounter.

Despite the intense scrutiny that the RCMP have faced, Leuprecht said the Mounties are probably looking forward to taking part in the commission of inquiry, which is expected to report its findings by November 2022.

“It will give the RCMP a chance to tell their story,” said Leuprecht, who also teaches at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ont.

“Canadians will be surprised. The story the RCMP is going to tell will be: ‘We did our best with the resources we had and the rules in place,’” he said.

“But there are some things that are going to come out of it that will change the way the RCMP responds to these types of incidents.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 13, 2021.

Michael MacDonald, The Canadian Press

Canada to get 1M COVID-19 vaccine doses from Pfizer this week, Moderna playing catch-up

LEE BERTHIAUME, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Apr 12th, 2021

The federal government is expecting Moderna to make good on a previously promised batch of 855,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses that were expected last week, but have yet to arrive.

Those delayed doses along with a little more than one million shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine represent the extent of Canada’s expected vaccine deliveries this week, even as the number of new COVID-19 cases across Canada continues to surge.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, the military officer overseeing the federal government’s vaccination distribution effort, blamed the delay in Moderna’s planned delivery on a “backlog with quality assurance.”

“It’s part of the manufacturing process, at the tail end of the manufacturing process, that they want to go through the proper quality assurance processes, and there’s a backlog,” he said last week.

Officials have indicated there could be a similar delay in the delivery of 1.2 million doses from Moderna next week.

“It’s prudent planning on our part right now to bank on the last week of April,” Fortin said.

In comparison, Pfizer-BioNTech has been consistently delivering more than 1 million shots to Canada each week for more than a month, a trend that is expected to continue for the foreseeable future.


RELATED: 3 more COVID-19 immunization sites opening in Toronto on Monday


The Public Health Agency is not expecting any shots of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine this week. Canada has also approved a vaccine produced by Johnson & Johnson, but it is not clear when the first of those doses will be delivered.

The rush to get vaccines into Canadians’ arms has grown more urgent as Canada continues to see a massive spike in the number of new COVID-19 infections.

Thousands of new cases were reported on Sunday, including a record 4,456 in Ontario alone. Dr. Theresa Tam, the country’s chief public health officer, noted admissions to intensive care units surged 23 per cent last week compared to the one before and said the Canada is approaching the peak of the current pandemic wave.

Tam said many of those getting sick are younger than in previous COVID-19 surges, which experts have blamed on virus variants that are spreading across the country.

That has prompted some provinces to start looking at changes to how they are distributing their vaccines.

More than 10 million doses had been distributed across Canada as of Sunday afternoon, according to covid19tracker.ca, with nearly 8 million having been administered.

Almost 20 per cent of the population has received at least one shot.

Montreal businesses clean up after anti-curfew protest turns violent

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Apr 12th, 2021

MONTREAL — Business owners in Old Montreal will be assessing the damage this morning after an anti-curfew protest turned violent.

Hundreds gathered in defiance of an 8 p.m. curfew that took effect in Montreal and Laval on Sunday night.

A mostly young crowd danced to music from loudspeakers while lighting fireworks and chanting, “freedom for the young.”

But the festive atmosphere quickly soured as a few protesters lit a garbage fire in Montreal’s Jacques Cartier Square.

Police fired tear gas and rushed the crowd, prompting dozens of protesters to scatter and cause mayhem down the cobblestone streets of Montreal’s historic tourist district.

The protesters lit garbage fires at many intersections and seized projectiles from city streets, hurling them at nearby windows and shattering many.

There was no word from police overnight whether anyone had been injured or any arrests had been made.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 12, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canada’s housing bubble is hitting smaller and smaller communities

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, Apr 12th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, bubbles are supposed to burst, aren’t they? At some point? It’s been more than half a decade since house prices in Canada began to truly climb, and that climb has accelerated even through a pandemic. It’s no longer just the big cities that are driving prices, either. It’s the smaller towns outside them—and the towns even further down the road when those smaller towns get too expensive.

What has the unending surge done to the Canadian economy? What could stop it? What happens in small Ontario towns when people from Toronto start flooding in and pushing home prices way over asking? And can we still call this a bubble, if some of the underlying factors driving it appear to be here to stay?

GUEST: Economist Mike Moffatt, Smart Prosperity Institute

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Economy adds 303,000 jobs in March, unemployment rate falls

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 9th, 2021

Statistics Canada says the economy added 303,000 jobs in in March as employment increased, with gains in sectors hardest hit by public health restrictions.

In March, Statistics Canada says there were about 95,000 more retail jobs, fully recouping losses sustained in January lockdowns, and an employment bump of 21,000 in the accommodation and food services sector.

The figure released this morning outpaced the 259,000 gain seen in February that, at the time, whipped past expectations.

The March increase puts employment 296,000 shy of the pre-COVID level in February 2020, or roughly 1.5 per cent of pre-crisis levels.

It also sent the unemployment rate to 7.5 per cent, down from 8.2 per cent in February, bringing the rate to a pandemic-era low.

The jobs numbers come just over a week before the federal Liberals release a budget where employment levels are expected to be used as a gauge for planned stimulus measures.

Page 12 of 89« First...1011121314...203040...Last »