1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Latest Posts

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, May 27th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

Health Canada says up to 37 million doses of vaccine could be shipped in May and June, but only 20.3 million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and 1.04 million doses of Moderna are confirmed. The remaining 11.3 million doses of Moderna, and another four million doses of Oxford-AstraZeneca from various sources are still tentative.

Procurement Minister Anita Anand says Moderna has assured her it will deliver millions of doses of its COVID-19 vaccine next month but still hasn’t confirmed the exact amount or timing of deliveries.

Anand says she has been on the phone to Moderna repeatedly, to push for an actual delivery schedule for June and July.

Moderna was originally supposed to ship 12.3 million doses between April and June, with the figure later revised to between 10 million and 12 million doses.

However the company has only shipped 3.7 million since April 1 and has no confirmed deliveries in place now.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

More than 655,000 doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the global vaccine sharing alliance known as COVAX, were scheduled to arrive and be distributed to provinces this week, but most provinces said they would put them on ice in reserve for second doses.

More than 20 million people across Canada have now had at least one dose of a vaccine.

Ottawa confirmed Wednesday that 20.05 million people have been vaccinated, or about 63 per cent of eligible Canadians over the age of 12, and almost 53 per cent of everyone, including children under the age of 12 who won’t become eligible to be vaccinated for several more months.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says by the summer, Canada will have enough vaccines so that every eligible resident will have gotten their first dose, and by September, it will have enough doses for everyone to be fully vaccinated.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization says it  believes it is safe and effective to offer the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to adolescents.

Health Canada authorized Pfizer for kids between 12 and 15 years old on May 5, after the company completed a clinical trial which found it was safe and 100 per cent effective at preventing kids in that age group from getting COVID-19.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

All people in the province aged 12 and older are now able to book an appointment for a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

So far 1.97 per cent (10,321) of the population has been fully vaccinated.

Health Minister John Haggie says the province has 1,480 doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine set to expire by the end of the month.

He says if the province cannot use them in time, they’ll be sent off to join the federal vaccine supply chain.

Nova Scotia

Appointments for an initial COVID-19 vaccine shot were opened across the province Tuesday to people 20 years of age and older, and officials said vaccine appointments would likely be opened to those 12 and up by the end of the week.

Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 vaccination rollout is ahead of schedule and should see second doses being administered two to four weeks earlier than originally planned, officials said Tuesday.

Under the province’s accelerated plan, someone who received their first dose of vaccine on March 22 and is due for a second dose on July 5 will now be able to reschedule their second appointment for as early as the week of June 20.

The province has stopped the use of AstraZeneca’s vaccine as a first dose.

The Health Department says the decision was based on “an abundance of caution” due to an observed increase in the rare blood-clotting condition linked to this vaccine.

The department also says it will reschedule anyone who was to receive AstraZeneca to instead be inoculated with Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna “in a timely manner.”

As of Tuesday, 521,053 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered, with 42,205 people having received their required second dose.

Prince Edward Island

In Prince Edward Island, residents as young as 16 can book a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

So far 7.66 per cent (12,156) of the population has been fully vaccinated.

New Brunswick

Residents in New Brunswick aged 12 to 17 are now eligible to book an appointment for a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Officials also say residents 55 and older who received an Astra-Zenaca vaccine for the first dose at least eight weeks ago can now get a second dose of the vaccine with informed consent.

Quebec

In Quebec, all residents 12 and older are able to book a COVID-19 vaccination appointment.

The province’s health minister says Quebecers 12 to 17 years old will be fully vaccinated by the time they return to school in September.

Quebec says it administered 58,764 doses of vaccine Tuesday, for a total of more than 5.1 million.

About 56.2 per cent of people in the province have received at least one dose.

Ontario

All adults in Ontario can now book COVID-19 vaccine appointments.

People turning 18 in 2021 can book Pfizer-BioNTech shots.

Youth aged 12 and older can also book appointments across Ontario.

They can book through the provincial online portal, call centre and through pharmacies offering the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, the only shot authorized by Health Canada for use in youth aged 12 and older.

The age group is becoming eligible a week ahead of schedule, though some regions have already started vaccinating youth at pop-ups and larger clinics.

The province aims to see all eligible Ontarians fully vaccinated by the end of September.

The province is distributing shots to regions on a per-capita basis, after two weeks of sending half of its vaccine supply to hot spots for COVID-19 infections.

Ontario is also resuming use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine but only as a second dose.

Dr. David Williams, the province’s chief medical officer of health, says those who received the first dose of AstraZeneca between March 10 and March 19 during a pilot project at pharmacies and some doctor’s offices in several Ontario communities will be first in line to receive their second dose.

Starting next week, those people could opt to receive the second dose at a 10-week interval − the recommended interval is 12 weeks − in order to use up the 45,000 doses currently in refrigerators in pharmacies and family doctors’ offices that will expire in 10 days. Another 10,000 doses are set to expire next month.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer vaccine for everyone aged 12 and up, and the Moderna vaccines for people aged 18 and up These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability. People 30-39 can get a shot if they have certain underlying health conditions such as chronic liver failure or severe obesity.

The province has opened up second-dose appointments to all Indigenous people aged 12 and up, to people with certain medical conditions such as severe heart failure and Down syndrome, and anyone who received their first dose on or before March 29.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan says it reached the Step 2 threshold on the province’s Re-Opening Roadmap today, with over 70 per cent of residents age 30 and older having received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

That means Step 2’s relaxation of restrictions will begin June 20, which includes easing capacity thresholds on retail, personal care services, restaurants and bars, although they must still maintain physical distancing among occupants or have barriers in place.

Step 2 rules also raise caps on private indoor gatherings to 15, while capacity limits jump to 150 for both public indoor gatherings and all outdoor assemblies, whether public or private.

Premier Scott Moe says once 70 per cent of the entire adult population is vaccinated, Saskatchewan can move to Step Three and remove almost all of the remaining public health orders.

Saskatchewan residents aged 12 and older are now eligible to book their first COVID-19 vaccine appointment.

A school immunization program for those aged 12-18 will be introduced in June, but eligible residents of that age can also be immunized at clinics offering the Pfizer vaccine.

Anyone 85 and older or anyone who received their first vaccine dose before February 15 can now book their second dose.

Anyone diagnosed with cancer and solid organ transplant recipients will be receiving a letter of eligibility in the mail which will allow them priority access to a second dose.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province.

The province says as of Tuesday, 63 per cent of all Saskatchewan adults have now received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Thirty-seven per cent of those in the 80-plus age group are now fully vaccinated.

Alberta

Every Albertan aged 12 and older is now eligible for a vaccine.

As of May 18, more than half of all Albertans over the age of 12 had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health has said people who are immunocompromised can book a second dose three of four weeks after their first shot. All other Albertans are eligible to get their second dose three to four months after the first.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province lowered the minimum age to 30. They are, however, reserving the remaining supply for second doses when people are eligible.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians’ clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and clinics.

British Columbia

Families can get vaccinated together in British Columbia as the government allows youth between the ages of 12 and 17 to get their COVID-19 shot.

The shots will be administered at community clinics instead of in schools based on feedback from families, with 310,000 children in B.C. eligible to get the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, which has been approved for that age group.

The government said the goal is to have those children vaccinated by the end of the school year.

People who’ve had a first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will have the option of choosing their second shot within a four-month interval in B.C.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says 20,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine are set to expire at the end of June and were reserved for people who may not be able to get an mRNA vaccine, such as the one made by Pfizer-BioNTech.

And she says more information is expected by the first week of June from a study in the United Kingdom on the effectiveness of switching vaccines for the second dose.

Henry says an increase in the supply of vaccines in the coming weeks means everyone can expect to have their second dose moved up.

As of Tuesday, almost three million doses of vaccine have been administered to adults over 18, with 152,010 of those second doses.

Nunavut

Chief public health officer Dr. Michael Patterson says Nunavut has placed an order for doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine with the federal government to vaccinate people ages 12 to 17 in the territory.

The Moderna vaccine is currently the only one available in Nunavut.

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from Southern Canada.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is now offering vaccinations against COVID-19 to young people between 12 and 17.

The territory, which has only been using the Moderna vaccine, recently exchanged some of that for doses of the Pfizer product, which Health Canada has now approved for anyone as young as 12.

Yukon

The territory started vaccinating children aged 12 to 17 on May 31.

The government says clinics in most communities will be held in schools, while those in Whitehorse can get their shot at the Coast High Country Inn Convention Centre. The children will be getting the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

The territory says because of limited supply and stricter handling requirements, the vaccine will only be available for a short time.

It says second doses for those 12 to 17 will start on June 23 and medical travel will be supported for youth who aren’t able to make the clinic date in their community.

The government says more than 75 per cent of all eligible adults have now received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

That amounts to 26,242 adults who have received their first dose, while the territory says 23,236 have received their second dose.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 27, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Is Greyhound’s exit a tragedy or an opportunity?

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, May 27th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, after nearly a century of moving Canadians between rural towns and big cities, Greyhound Canada announced last week it would end all Canadian routes. This is a move that could be devastating for hundreds of thousands of Canadians who lack access to a car and might be stranded without access to medical appointments, connection to family or dozens of other intercity transportation needs.

But that’s only if nobody acts to replace what Greyhound offered with a better version. There are a number of possibilities that could remake the bus landscape in Canada. The question is if any level of government has the will to implement them.

GUEST: Alexis Zhou, freelance journalist, transportation advocate

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

52% of Canadians feel anxious about return to ‘normal’ after COVID-19: survey

STEPHANIE TAYLOR, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, May 26th, 2021

More than half of Canadians feel somewhat anxious about going back to the way life was before it was turned upside down by the COVID-19 pandemic, a new survey shows.

Leger asked the question for a study done in collaboration with the Association for Canadian Studies.

Data shows 1,647 Canadians responded to a web survey from May 21 to 23, which cannot be assigned a margin of error because it was done online.

Respondents were asked whether returning to what life was like before the novel coronavirus was a source of anxiety for them, given how governments are announcing plans to reopen after more than a year of telling people to stay home.

The results show 52 per cent of those who responded reported feeling some level of anxiety, with those aged 18 to 24 showing the highest levels of unease at 68 per cent.

“Maybe some of it is related to work, maybe some of it is related to, ‘When we actually go back to normal, will it be safe? Will I feel comfortable around somebody not wearing a mask anymore?’” said Christian Bourque, executive vice-president of the polling and marketing research firm Leger.

For others, he said, it could come down to thinking like, “Oh God, I have to invite the in-laws again.”

“There’s something about this new life during the pandemic that people actually sort of grew into, and potentially, sort of, maybe like,” Bourque said.

The findings come as vaccines that protect against COVID-19 go into the arms of more Canadians, thanks to a steadier flow of federal shipments arriving than seen early in the year.

With more inoculations comes planning from provinces and federal advice about when daily activities, like playing sports outside and eating at a restaurant, can be allowed again, along with kids going back to the classroom.

Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan have each outlined plans to ease health restrictions through spring and summer in stages, according to how many people are vaccinated against COVID-19.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and federal officials are also fielding questions about how much longer the Canada-U. S. border will remain closed and what documentation Canadians might need to travel abroad, as well as vice versa for those entering the country.

Bourque suggested Leger’s research shows those in power would be wise to take a slower approach to reopening society, even as a post-COVID Canada seems to grow closer on the horizon.

“I would be extremely careful as to not sound over-joyous because that’s not the sentiment right now among Canadians.”

As for why young adults report feeling more anxious than other age groups about a return to normal, Bourque said it could be related to them being “the anxiety generation.”

Close to half of younger Canadians generally feel they suffer from some form of anxiety, he said, and so have more awareness of it and a greater willingness to name it than older residents.

Plus, for some in their 20s, their social life could be what makes them anxious.

“Potentially for younger Canadians who maybe have felt some form of isolation during the pandemic are probably weary about how will it be, how do I go back to the way things were,” said Bourque.

“‘I was not that popular before the pandemic, what will happen to me now?’ There might be a lot of that.”

A terrifying medical mystery in New Brunswick

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, May 26th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, when people started presenting with symptoms, local doctors and scientists wondered if the mysterious neurological disorder might be Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. But it wasn’t. It wasn’t anything else that we recognize, either.

And the symptoms are a long list that run from inconvenient to painful to life-altering and deadly. We don’t know what’s causing it, haven’t been able to treat it and—because of the pandemic—haven’t been able to fully research the places where it may have come from. What we do know is that it’s awful. And in New Brunswick it’s becoming more common.

GUEST: Amanda Coletta, The Washington Post

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Year of calls to ‘defund the police’ in Canada remain largely unanswered: activist

STEFANIE LASUIK | posted Tuesday, May 25th, 2021

WINNIPEG (CityNews) — As protesters across the country took to the streets following George Floyd’s death last summer, many Canadians began wondering if funds dedicated to police departments could be better spent elsewhere.

Calls to reallocate or completely withdraw funding from police forces gained impetus in the months following Floyd’s death — a movement that rippled across Canada and the United States.

“Take some of the funds away from that kind of programming and re-invest it into programs in the community that we know work,” said Syrus Marcus Ware, co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto. “Housing works. Food works. Shelter works. Making sure that there are community centres and places for young people to go to.

“Those programs work. We know these things work, so why not re-invest in them.”

READ: Defund the police demonstrations being held across Canada (Aug. 29, 2020)

Advocates for defunding the police have asked for anywhere between 10 to 50 per cent of police budgets to be refunnelled into social programs.

One year later, they say their calls remain largely unanswered.

Police forces in Montreal, Edmonton and Winnipeg each received just over two per cent increases this year, with the latter two projecting about the same for 2022.

Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary froze their budgets, but Vancouver’s police board is now appealing that decision. They’re also asking for an annual three per cent increase for the following four years.

And the City of Toronto is projecting a five per cent increase for 2022.

Ware says it’s a trick in optics, and a costly one.

“It’s outrageous when we think about the way our police budget goes,” he said. “It’s almost a guarantee that they’re going to get an increase every year, despite whether or not they’ve earned the so-called increase. This is not a merit increase. This is just a guaranteed increase every year.”

Winnipeg police chief Danny Smyth says he is open to some defunding, but not right away. Smyth says the city is far from stable and it would leave a gap in services.

“If we can get to a stable place where police aren’t required, absolutely,” said Smyth.
“But in the interim, I see it about partnerships and partnering with the service providers out there so they can do what they do safely and we can ensure a safe environment.”

READ: The truth about being a Black police officer

Earlier this year, in a CityNews exclusive collaboration, Sportsnet’s Donnovan Bennett sat down with three Black police officers. They said, ironically, that police leadership has been calling for more social service support for years because officers have involuntarily become the go-to for everything.

“Homelessness, drug addiction, unknown problems, everything defaults to the police service,” said Marc Andrews, deputy chief of the Peel Regional Police Service. “That’s because all the social service agencies have not been strengthened and given the capacity and capability to respond appropriately in our communities.”

According to a survey conducted last summer, 51 per cent of Canadians support the refunnelling of police funding while 49 per cent opposed it.

Ware believes the ‘defund the police’ movement’s momentum — in full force last year — hasn’t stopped since then.

“We are now officially in a revolutionary moment,” he said. “It’s not a one-time event. It’s a process. And so those uprisings are part of a series of uprisings that are going to continue, I think, until change is made, because people are ready right now for something different in their communities.”

He expects it to be a hot-button issue in the next federal election.

The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, May 25th, 2021

The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (all times Eastern):

8:45 a.m.

Moderna says it will ask Canada to authorize its vaccine for kids between 12 and 17 years old after a study of its mRNA vaccine in teenagers shows it to be both safe and effective.

The Massachusetts-based vaccine maker says it will submit the study results to international regulators in early June.

The company says the study of 3,700 kids in that age group found no cases of COVID-19 among the kids who got two doses of the vaccine. The youth got the same size doses as adults, four weeks apart.

The company says there were no serious safety issues, and the side-effects mirrored those seen in adults, with headache, fatigue, pain and chills the most commonly reported issues after the second dose.

More than two dozen countries, including Canada, have greenlighted the vaccine for use in adults, but thus far Pfizer-BioNTech is the only vaccine available in Canada for youth.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Thursday, May 20, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, May 21st, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 10:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 20, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 396,687 new vaccinations administered for a total of 19,840,991 doses given. Nationwide, 1,529,111 people or 4.0 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 52,351.898 per 100,000.

There were 1,745,470 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 22,932,424 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 86.52 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 33,964 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 253,790 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 484.673 per 1,000. In the province, 1.92 per cent (10,058) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 37,080 new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 316,090 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 60 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.29 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 11,059 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 78,817 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 496.864 per 1,000. In the province, 7.66 per cent (12,156) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 8,190 new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 93,105 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 59 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.65 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 60,793 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 463,526 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 474.974 per 1,000. In the province, 4.15 per cent (40,495) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 52,650 new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 572,200 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 59 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.01 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 58,325 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 385,958 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 494.793 per 1,000. In the province, 4.46 per cent (34,753) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 54,450 new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 470,385 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 60 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 82.05 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 93,314 new vaccinations administered for a total of 4,636,679 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 541.88 per 1,000. There were 148,100 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 5,184,819 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 61 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.43 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 144,986 new vaccinations administered for a total of 7,576,624 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 515.80 per 1,000. In the province, 3.23 per cent (473,759) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 1,041,910 new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 8,885,735 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 60 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.27 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 13,581 new vaccinations administered for a total of 692,301 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 502.759 per 1,000. In the province, 6.11 per cent (84,141) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 73,710 new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 833,580 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 61 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.05 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 4,777 new vaccinations administered for a total of 620,236 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 526.001 per 1,000. In the province, 4.37 per cent (51,559) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 83,580 new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 720,695 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 61 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.06 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 40,866 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,312,821 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 525.397 per 1,000. In the province, 7.62 per cent (335,482) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 232,830 new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 2,588,085 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 59 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 54,453 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,687,360 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 523.691 per 1,000. In the province, 2.71 per cent (138,908) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 12,970 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 3,105,610 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 61 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.53 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 169 new vaccinations administered for a total of 51,534 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,234.909 per 1,000. In the territory, 57.88 per cent (24,153) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 57,020 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 140 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 90.38 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 51,320 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,137.437 per 1,000. In the territory, 50.89 per cent (22,960) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 60,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 130 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 85.53 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 30,025 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 775.319 per 1,000. In the territory, 34.36 per cent (13,305) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 45,100 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 66.57 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 20, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canadians in Japan say the Olympics should be cancelled

HINA ALAM, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, May 21st, 2021

Canadian Jordan Dallaire-Gagné just wanted to be part of the largest sporting event in the world. Working or volunteering at the Tokyo Olympics was top of mind when the Montrealer moved to Japan a little over a year ago.

But Dallaire-Gagné said the Games should be cancelled as parts of the world face surging waves of COVID-19.

Dallaire-Gagné and several other Canadians living in Japan said sports are about camaraderie, cheering fans, full stadiums and a festive atmosphere that spills into the streets. Canadians in Japan were looking forward to cheering Team Canada in Tokyo.

The idea of mostly empty stadiums, devoid of foreign spectators, feels wrong, the Canadians said, adding the focus of the governments, not just in Japan but from countries sending their athletes, should simply be to get through COVID-19.

“I mean, it’s just the whole idea of participating,” Dallaire-Gagné said in an interview from Tokyo. “This is almost a once-in-a-lifetime event. I would have kept my ticket. I would say I was there.”

Calls to cancel the Olympics are growing. Anywhere from 60 to 80 per cent of Japanese residents in polls say it is their wish that the Games be cancelled.

The Olympics open on July 23 followed by the Paralympics on Aug. 24.

Dallaire-Gagné said it’s hard to look at the part of the city that is supposed to house the athletes because it seems to lack a sense of light and life.

“It’s just like basically a part of town that could be used as a zombie apocalypse movie set,” he said. “They’re just there. It’s just so sad.”

A 6,000-member Tokyo Medical Practitioners’ Association has also called for the Olympics to be cancelled in a letter sent last week to Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike, Olympic Minister Tamayo Marukawa, and Seiko Hashimoto, the head of the organizing committee.

The Olympics and Paralympics will involve 15,000 athletes entering Japan, which has had its borders virtually sealed for more than a year.

Rebekkah Nyack, an undergraduate student at Temple University’s Japan campus, said she is worried about the spread of infection if the games go-ahead.

“Tokyo is such a dense city with so many people,” said the Canmore, Alta. resident, who is studying international affairs.

“If there’s a large outbreak there’s a higher chance of me getting (COVID-19) and people in my community getting it.”

Between one and two per cent of Japanese residents are fully vaccinated, and it’s unlikely that even the elderly population will be fully vaccinated before the Olympics end on Aug. 8.

Fans from abroad have already been banned, and Olympic organizers are expected to announce next month if local fans can attend in limited numbers — or not at all.

Nyack said that even though the Games are a “fantastic” thing to happen every four years, it is far more important right now to keep people safe.

The idea of largely empty stadiums is disheartening, she said.

“The sense of community the sports bring — it’s an important part right?” she asked.

“So, if you don’t have that then what’s the point?”

Jared Parales said if the Olympics are held, tickets are affordable, social distancing measures are comfortable and all precautions are taken, he may go and watch the Canadian volleyball team.

The Calgarian, who lives in Tokyo, said he’s seen some sports events go ahead with cardboard figures filling seats, but added it’s not the same as having screaming and cheering fans.

Ideally, he said he wants to see the Games cancelled.

“For Olympics, a lot of people love it,” he said.

“And I love sports. I love the Olympics. I want to see it happen, but I want to see it happen right and not right now.”

With files from The Associated Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Thursday, May 20, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, May 20th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Thursday, May 20, 2021.

There are 1,342,388 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 1,342,388 confirmed cases (61,608 active, 1,255,714 resolved, 25,066 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 4,248 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 162.1 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 36,595 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 5,228.

There were 48 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 301 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 43. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 65.95 per 100,000 people.

There have been 33,754,111 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,212 confirmed cases (82 active, 1,124 resolved, six deaths).

There were three new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 15.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 46 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is seven.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 257,774 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 199 confirmed cases (14 active, 185 resolved, zero deaths).

There were five new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 8.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 155,951 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 5,000 confirmed cases (1,262 active, 3,664 resolved, 74 deaths).

There were 83 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 128.86 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 703 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 100.

There were two new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 7.56 per 100,000 people.

There have been 739,773 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 2,091 confirmed cases (117 active, 1,931 resolved, 43 deaths).

There were eight new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 14.97 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 67 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 10.

There was one new reported death Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 5.5 per 100,000 people.

There have been 326,617 tests completed.

Quebec: 364,980 confirmed cases (6,535 active, 347,387 resolved, 11,058 deaths).

There were 584 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 76.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,779 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 683.

There were eight new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 46 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is seven. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 128.96 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,916,666 tests completed.

Ontario: 514,690 confirmed cases (23,416 active, 482,749 resolved, 8,525 deaths).

There were 1,588 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 158.92 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 15,278 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,183.

There were 19 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 151 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 22. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.15 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 57.86 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,666,825 tests completed.

Manitoba: 46,314 confirmed cases (4,550 active, 40,748 resolved, 1,016 deaths).

There were 402 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 329.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,174 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 453.

There were four new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.18 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 73.66 per 100,000 people.

There have been 754,351 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 44,982 confirmed cases (1,786 active, 42,674 resolved, 522 deaths).

There were 141 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 151.53 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,279 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 183.

There were zero new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 14 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.17 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.29 per 100,000 people.

There have been 825,704 tests completed.

Alberta: 221,467 confirmed cases (18,813 active, 200,496 resolved, 2,158 deaths).

There were 908 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 425.45 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,832 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,119.

There were six new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 35 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 48.8 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,419,872 tests completed.

British Columbia: 140,596 confirmed cases (4,953 active, 133,985 resolved, 1,658 deaths).

There were 521 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 96.22 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,373 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 482.

There were eight new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 33 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 32.21 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,644,363 tests completed.

Yukon: 84 confirmed cases (zero active, 82 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Wednesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,129 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 126 confirmed cases (17 active, 109 resolved, zero deaths).

There was one new case Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 37.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 22,572 tests completed.

Nunavut: 634 confirmed cases (63 active, 567 resolved, four deaths).

There were four new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 160.09 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 40 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is six.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,438 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 20, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Page 17 of 103« First...10...1516171819...304050...Last »