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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Tuesday, March 16, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 16th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday, March 16, 2021.

There are 913,047 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 913,047 confirmed cases (31,630 active, 858,922 resolved, 22,495 deaths). The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 2,847 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 83.23 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 22,355 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,194.

There were 25 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 220 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 31. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.19 per 100,000 people.

There have been 25,996,052 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,012 confirmed cases (54 active, 952 resolved, six deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 10.34 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 211,856 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 143 confirmed cases (16 active, 127 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 10.02 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 116,710 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 1,670 confirmed cases (17 active, 1,588 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 1.74 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been 388,121 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 1,471 confirmed cases (37 active, 1,404 resolved, 30 deaths).

There was one new case Monday. The rate of active cases is 4.73 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There were zero new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 249,333 tests completed.

Quebec: 298,186 confirmed cases (6,881 active, 280,755 resolved, 10,550 deaths).

There were 594 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 80.25 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,976 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 711.

There were 10 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 69 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 123.04 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,654,604 tests completed.

Ontario: 319,374 confirmed cases (12,528 active, 299,684 resolved, 7,162 deaths).

There were 1,268 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 85.03 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,447 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,350.

There were nine new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 85 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 12. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 48.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,608,655 tests completed.

Manitoba: 32,793 confirmed cases (908 active, 30,968 resolved, 917 deaths).

There were 50 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 65.83 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 509 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 73.

There were zero new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 11 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 66.48 per 100,000 people.

There have been 557,304 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 30,727 confirmed cases (1,299 active, 29,021 resolved, 407 deaths).

There were 110 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 110.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 922 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 132.

There were zero new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of eight new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 34.53 per 100,000 people.

There have been 609,678 tests completed.

Alberta: 138,788 confirmed cases (4,811 active, 132,028 resolved, 1,949 deaths).

There were 364 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 108.8 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,669 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 381.

There were three new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 29 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.08 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,520,180 tests completed.

British Columbia: 88,373 confirmed cases (5,076 active, 81,890 resolved, 1,407 deaths).

There were 460 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 98.61 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,804 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 543.

There were three new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 16 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.33 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,046,787 tests completed.

Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one death).

There were zero new cases Monday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,340 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,290 tests completed.

Nunavut: 383 confirmed cases (two active, 380 resolved, one death).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 5.08 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,118 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 16, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Over half of Canadians say monarchy is obsolete after Harry and Meghan’s interview: Poll

MAAN ALHMIDI, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 16th, 2021

A new poll suggests just over half of Canadians believe the British monarchy is a relic that Canada should abandon, following Prince Harry and Meghan’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey.

Fifty-three per cent of respondents to an online survey by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies say the British monarchy no longer has its place in 21st-century Canada, while one-third say they would rather preserve this part of our heritage.

Leger executive vice-president Christian Bourque said the interview — and how Canadians are responding to its revelations — should be considered a blow for the monarchy and those who believe in the importance of the role it plays in Canada.

“I think this probably would not have been true a few weeks ago,” Bourque said.

The poll also found that 59 per cent of respondents sympathize more with Harry and Meghan, while 26 per cent say they held more sympathy for the Royal Family.

The online poll of 1,512 adult Canadians was carried out March 12 to 14. It cannot be assigned a margin of error because internet-based surveys are not considered random samples.

Fifty-two per cent say the recent events involving the couple, which included the Duchess of Sussex divulging that she had been driven to thoughts of suicide and that a member of the Royal Family had asked how dark her son Archie’s skin might be, speak about a fundamental problem with the institution.

Forty-three per cent of respondents say the recent events show the Royal Family holds racist views, which Bourque said is damaging to its reputation.

The negative view of the monarchy was higher in Quebec, where 71 per cent of respondents said it is out of date, which Bourque said is not surprising.

“Even if you exclude the Quebec numbers, you still get about half of Canadians who say basically do we really need the Royal Family in Canada,” he said.

An earlier poll of 2,122 adult Canadians carried out from Feb. 5 to 7 had 46 per cent of respondents saying the monarchy is outdated and that Canada should get rid of it, so the numbers are slightly higher after the interview with Harry and Meghan.

In the more recent poll, Canadians appear divided on what could replace the monarchy.

Thirty-six per cent of respondents said they would prefer the prime minister be the head of state, with no other representative such as the governor general. Sixteen per cent said they would like Canada to be a republic with an elected president and 20 per cent said they would like to keep the existing arrangement.

—–

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Sobeys parent company buys 51% stake in Longo’s for $357M

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 16th, 2021

Empire Company Ltd. says it has signed a deal to buy a 51 per cent stake in specialty grocery store chain Longo’s and its Grocery Gateway e-commerce business for $357 million.

The parent company of Sobeys says the deal adds two high-quality banners to its business and helps it grow in Ontario.

Under the deal, Longo’s and Grocery Gateway will continue to be led by CEO Anthony Longo.

However, Empire says Longo’s will be able to benefit from its infrastructure and capabilities, in areas such as sourcing, logistics and real estate.

Longo’s has 36 locations in the Greater Toronto Area, while Grocery Gateway serves 70,000 customers.

The deal, which is subject to customary closing conditions, is expected to close in the first quarter of Empire’s 2022 financial year.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Sunday, March 14, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Mar 15th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 8:30 p.m. ET on Sunday March 14, 2021.

There are 909,157 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 909,157 confirmed cases (31,674 active, 855,020 resolved, 22,463 deaths). The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 2,957 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 83.34 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 21,502 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,072.

There were 29 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 215 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 31. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.11 per 100,000 people.

There have been 25,881,400 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,012 confirmed cases (56 active, 950 resolved, six deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 10.73 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of six new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 211,268 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 143 confirmed cases (16 active, 127 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 10.02 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 116,371 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 1,670 confirmed cases (18 active, 1,587 resolved, 65 deaths).

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 1.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 11 new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been 385,665 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 1,470 confirmed cases (38 active, 1,402 resolved, 30 deaths).

There were five new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.86 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 15 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 248,792 tests completed.

Quebec: 297,592 confirmed cases (7,022 active, 280,030 resolved, 10,540 deaths).

There were 674 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 81.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,961 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 709.

There were five new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 68 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 122.92 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,631,808 tests completed.

Ontario: 318,106 confirmed cases (12,383 active, 298,570 resolved, 7,153 deaths).

There were 1,747 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 84.04 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,810 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,401.

There were 15 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 86 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 12. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 48.55 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,561,037 tests completed.

Manitoba: 32,743 confirmed cases (891 active, 30,935 resolved, 917 deaths).

There were 44 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 64.6 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 518 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 74.

There was one new reported death Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 66.48 per 100,000 people.

There have been 553,781 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 30,620 confirmed cases (1,399 active, 28,814 resolved, 407 deaths).

There were 98 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 118.69 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 911 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 130.

There were two new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of nine new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 34.53 per 100,000 people.

There have been 607,926 tests completed.

Alberta: 138,424 confirmed cases (4,697 active, 131,781 resolved, 1,946 deaths).

There were 388 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 106.22 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,583 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 369.

There were six new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 28 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.01 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,502,952 tests completed.

British Columbia: 86,867 confirmed cases (5,145 active, 80,325 resolved, 1,397 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 99.95 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,683 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 383.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.03 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.14 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,029,164 tests completed.

Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,313 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,214 tests completed.

Nunavut: 383 confirmed cases (eight active, 374 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 20.33 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,033 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 14, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How GoFundMe became everyone’s digital safety net

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, Mar 15th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, while crowdfunding sites were originally intended to help with getting projects off the ground, over the past decade they’ve increasingly become a last-resort for people who have fallen through the cracks of the services government provides. It’s not just raw funds that the digital safety net provides where governments don’t—it’s everything from reddit users helping you navigate complex taxes, or benefits to crowdsourced neighbourhood childcare.

Should Canadians facing eviction have to rely on going viral to stay in their homes? The obvious answer is, no, they probably shouldn’t. But they are anyway, so what should we do about it?

GUEST: Vass Bednar, Executive Director, Master of Public Policy Program at McMaster University; author of Regs 2 Riches

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Rogers to buy Shaw in deal valued at $26B

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Mar 15th, 2021

Rogers Communications Inc. has signed a deal to buy Shaw Communications Inc. in a deal valued at $26 billion, including debt.

Under the plan, Rogers will pay $40.50 in cash for all of Shaw’s issued and outstanding class A and class B shares.

Shaw’s class B shares closed at $23.90 on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Friday.

As part of the transaction, the companies said Rogers will invest $2.5 billion in 5G networks over the next five years across Western Canada.

Rogers also says it will create a new $1-billion fund dedicated to connecting rural, remote and Indigenous communities across Western Canada to high-speed internet service.

The deal, which is subject to other customary closing conditions, as well as approvals from Canadian regulators, is expected to close in the first half of 2022.

________

Rogers is the parent company of this website and station.

Canada’s unemployment rate falls to lowest level since March 2020

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

Statistics Canada says the economy added 259,000 jobs in February, almost wiping out losses sustained over the previous two months.

The economy lost almost 213,000 jobs in January as lockdown measures erased months of gains, and marked the worst monthly declines since last April.

February’s reopenings reversed that drop with gains largely in Ontario and Quebec, and in sectors highly affected by tightened public health restrictions.

The national unemployment rate fell to 8.2 per cent, the lowest level since March 2020 at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and down from the 9.4 per cent recorded in February.

Statistics Canada says the unemployment rate would have been 10.7 per cent in February had it included in calculations Canadians who wanted to work but didn’t search for a job.

The figures blew past expectations of a gain of 75,000 and an unemployment rate of 9.2 per cent, according to financial data firm Refinitiv.

CIBC senior economist Royce Mendes writes that the quick turnaround in jobs numbers is reminiscent of the first wave of the pandemic when employment rebounded far faster than expected as the economy began reopening.

However, he says in a note that the labour market has a long way to get back to where it was prior to COVID-19.

The gains now leave the country 599,100 jobs short of where they were in February of last year, or 3.1 per cent below pre-pandemic levels.

The federal government is keeping a close eye on the labour market, suggesting it will use jobs as a gauge for planned stimulus measures to be unveiled in a spring budget.

So too is the Bank of Canada monitoring employment, noting the uneven impacts of job losses in its reasoning this week for holding its key policy rate at 0.25 per cent.

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Friday, March 12, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Friday, March 12, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 89,074 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,719,227 doses given. Nationwide, 587,721 people or 1.6 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 7,174.878 per 100,000.

There were 11,700 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 3,227,410 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 84.25 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland</b> is reporting 8,864 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 33,621 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 64.207 per 1,000. In the province, 1.75 per cent (9,170) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 48,470 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>P.E.I.</b> is reporting 1,945 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 15,226 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 95.985 per 1,000. In the province, 3.52 per cent (5,584) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 15,885 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 10 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.85 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Nova Scotia</b> is reporting 7,559 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 45,149 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 46.264 per 1,000. In the province, 1.58 per cent (15,383) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 73,680 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 61.28 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>New Brunswick</b> is reporting 4,742 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 38,483 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 49.335 per 1,000. In the province, 1.56 per cent (12,152) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 56,135 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 68.55 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Quebec</b> is reporting 19,227 new vaccinations administered for a total of 619,060 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 72.348 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 825,065 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 75.03 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Ontario</b> is reporting 40,610 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,019,407 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 69.399 per 1,000. In the province, 1.92 per cent (281,714) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 1,086,745 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.8 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Manitoba</b> is reporting 2,998 new vaccinations administered for a total of 97,783 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 71.011 per 1,000. In the province, 2.26 per cent (31,103) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 9,360 new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 159,220 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 12 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 61.41 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Saskatchewan</b> is reporting 1,493 new vaccinations administered for a total of 95,879 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 81.312 per 1,000. In the province, 2.38 per cent (28,107) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 93,145 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 102.9 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Alberta</b> is reporting 8,612 new vaccinations administered for a total of 317,574 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 72.142 per 1,000. In the province, 2.08 per cent (91,366) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 326,445 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 97.28 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>British Columbia</b> is reporting 11,451 new vaccinations administered for a total of 366,791 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 71.477 per 1,000. In the province, 1.70 per cent (87,009) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 2,340 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 445,920 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 8.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 82.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Yukon</b> is reporting 800 new vaccinations administered for a total of 26,374 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 632.00 per 1,000. In the territory, 22.17 per cent (9,253) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 35,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 84 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 75.35 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>The Northwest Territories</b> are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 28,208 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 625.191 per 1,000. In the territory, 24.71 per cent (11,151) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 35,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 78 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 79.91 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Nunavut</b> is reporting 253 new vaccinations administered for a total of 15,672 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 404.689 per 1,000. In the territory, 14.79 per cent (5,729) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 26,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 59.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 12, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canada, U.S. mark 30th anniversary of acid rain treaty

BOB WEBER, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

Tens of thousands of lakes were dying, their lifeless waters clear to the depths. Public statues were eroding, their features eaten away by acid falling from the skies.

No more.

Thirty years after Canada and the United States signed a treaty on reducing acid rain, the deal has become a landmark — and a guidebook — on how nations can work together to solve environmental problems.

“It’s an example,” said John Smol, a biologist at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont. He did some of the early scientific research that connected the dots between emissions and empty watersheds.

“It showed you can get together and deal with a transboundary problem. You can set realistic targets. It really was a success story.”

The trouble was sulphur and nitrous dioxides from industrial smokestacks and cars combining with atmospheric moisture.

The treaty signed March 13, 1991, by Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. president George Bush changed all that.

A quarter of a century later, Canadian emissions of sulphur dioxide had decreased by 69 per cent. Nitrogen dioxide had fallen by more than 25 per cent. Emissions continue to fall.

It wasn’t easy, said Elizabeth May, a Green party MP and former party leader, who was then a senior policy adviser to Mulroney’s Progressive Conservative government.

“Just as we have false stories about climate change, we had false stories about acid rain,” she said. “At one point, (former U.S. president) Ronald Reagan said acid rain was caused by ducks.

“You had a strong lobby from the coal-producing states. You had a strong lobby in Canada. They weren’t feeling very co-operative. So where do you start?”

She gives a lot of credit to her old boss.

“Mulroney put acid rain at the top of every bilateral meeting,” she said.

“It was quite extraordinary how a plan came together. Often in politics, it’s quite random. Something goes wrong, someone’s in the right place at the right time.

“But this was a strategy that from its inception worked perfectly. You need leadership from the top and you need to demonstrate you’re serious.

“We haven’t seen political will like that in decades.”

Parallels with climate change are obvious, said Smol.

“It went through the same steps. It went from ‘there is no problem’ to ‘there is a problem, but it’s not our fault’ to ‘there is a problem, it is our fault, but it’s too late to do anything.’”

But a deal was achieved.


RELATED: ‘It starts at home:’ Former PM Brian Mulroney reflects on lessons from acid rain


“It is one of those rare environmental victories,” said Keith Stewart of Greenpeace. “We developed a treaty, implemented it and largely solved that particular problem.

“Industry stopped pumping money into lawyers and lobbyists and started hiring engineers, and they were able to solve the problem in relatively short order. The economy did not fall apart.”

Comparisons between acid rain and climate change can go too far, said Nelson Wiseman, a University of Toronto political scientist.

“The challenge is quite different,” he said. “Climate change is a global problem. Canada and the U.S. can agree to anything they want, climate change will continue.”

Wiseman also suggested politicians of different stripes were able to work together more easily back then.

“Things maybe are more polarized now than they were 30 years ago.”

The relationship between Mulroney and Bush was extraordinarily close. Mulroney gave the eulogy at Bush’s funeral.

“I don’t think you can say that about (Prime Minister Justin) Trudeau and (President Joe) Biden,” Wiseman said.

Still, said May, there’s a window for the two countries to make progress on this generation’s environmental challenge, just as they did on acid rain.

“We have a real opportunity with the Biden administration,” she said.

“Think about COVID. The kind of response we should be seeing for the climate crisis is now visible in how governments are responding to the COVID crisis.

“Is it possible that we could respond to the climate crisis with the same seriousness of purpose that we responded to acid rain? Absolutely.”

Just look at the results, said Mulroney.

“Interesting thing about acid rain,” he told The Canadian Press.

“You probably haven’t heard very much about it anymore. It doesn’t exist anymore because we got rid of it.”

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