1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Latest Posts

What does the carbon tax ruling mean?

THE BIG STORY | posted Friday, Mar 26th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, Canada’s Supreme Court issued an historic ruling yesterday, deciding by a 6-3 margin the the federal government does indeed have the power to implement a carbon tax (or a price on pollution) in provinces that don’t set their own. The decision has implications on both sides of the fight, and on how future governments could use this ruling to perhaps expand their powers.

What’s in the ruling, exactly? What does it mean for Canadians, for the climate and for its political opponents? How will it impact the next election, and what will the premiers who fought so hard against it do next?

GUEST: Fatima Syed, for The Narwhal

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Health officials say vaccinations will begin this week for first responders. They say pre-registration for COVID-19 vaccines has opened for people aged 70 or older and for home-support workers.

Newfoundland and Labrador announced March 3 it was extending the interval between the first and second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to four months.

Public health officials said the change will help them vaccinate 40,000 more people with a single dose by the end of March. Liberal Leader and incumbent Premier Andrew Furey said the decision is a game changer for the province’s vaccination prospects.

Nova Scotia

Health officials say people aged 60 to 62 became eligible to receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine starting March 18.

Nova Scotia plans to have vaccine available to at least 75 per cent of the population by the end of September 2021.

The province is planning to use mobile van clinics to vaccinate about 900 people who work at or use homeless shelters in the Halifax area.

Public health is partnering with pharmacists and doctors to provide the vaccines at 25 locations.

Nova Scotia, meanwhile, has added front-line police officers to the list of people eligible for vaccination during the second phase of the province’s rollout plan, joining groups such as long-haul truck drivers and hospital workers over the age of 60.

Prince Edward Island

Health officials in Prince Edward Island say they will shift their focus to getting a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine to all adults by July 1, even if it means delaying the second shot for some.

The province is offering the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine people ages 18 to 29 who work in gas stations and convenience or grocery stores.

The announcement on March 16 came after the province opened AstraZeneca vaccination appointments a week earlier to young people in the food and beverage sector.

New Brunswick 

Health officials announced March 18 that people 80 and older, health-care professionals who have close contact with patients, and people with complex medical conditions are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 80 and over, a caregiver or a family member acting on their behalf can make an appointment for a vaccine at a pharmacy.

The province says all residents of long-term care homes have been offered at least one dose of vaccine. On Friday, March 19, all residents of First Nations communities who are aged 16 or older will have access to their first dose of vaccine.

Quebec 

Quebec started vaccinating older seniors on March 1 after a first phase that focused largely on health-care workers, remote communities and long-term care. In Montreal, mass vaccine sites, including the Olympic Stadium, opened their doors to the public as the province began inoculating seniors who live in the hard-hit city.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments opened March 10 for residents 70 and older across Quebec. The minimum age is currently set at 65 in Abitibi-Temiscamingue and Cote-Nord. However, Montreal is dropping the age limit to 60.

Premier Francois Legault says his government’s goal is for all adult Quebecers who want a COVID-19 vaccine to get at least one dose by the province’s Fete nationale on June 24. He also said the province’s vaccination campaign will allow all Quebecers aged 65 and over to be vaccinated with one dose by mid-April.

Quebec, meanwhile, is looking to enlist between 20 and 50 companies across the province to operate vaccination hubs to help accelerate its immunization campaign for people under 60.

Health Minister Christian Dube says he’s hoping the companies can administer a total of one million vaccines.

To be part of the program, companies must commit to vaccinating between 15,000 and 25,000 people over a 12-week period between May and August.

Quebec will provide the vaccines and necessary equipment and run the online appointment portal. The program will begin when residents under the age of 60 become eligible to be vaccinated, with a goal of fully vaccinating 500,000 Quebecers.

Ontario

Ontario launched its COVID-19 vaccine booking portal and call centre on March 15.

People aged 80 and older were the first eligible to use the system. Starting March 22, people age 75 and older will be able to make appointments through the booking system.

Ontario focused its initial vaccine effort on those in long-term care, high-risk retirement home residents, some health-care workers and people who live in congregate care settings.

It has said the rollout will look different in each of its 34 public health units. Some public health units are ahead of the province’s schedule for vaccinations.

A pilot project at more than 300 pharmacies in Toronto, Kingston and Windsor Oxford-AstraZeneca started offering shots to those aged 60 to 64 in March.

That program is being expanded to offer shots to people aged 60 and older starting on March 22. Some primary care physicians are also offering Oxford-AstraZeneca shots to eligible patients in that age range.

The pharmacy pilot will expand to 700 locations across the province in the coming weeks, then to approximately 1,500 sites as supply becomes available.

Other currently eligible people include front line health-care workers, Indigenous adults and chronic home health-care recipients, and some health units have started vaccinating people experiencing homelessness.

The interval between vaccine doses has been extended to four months in Ontario.

Manitoba

Manitoba is starting to vaccinate people aged 65 and older and First Nation people aged 45 and older. Health officials plan to reduce the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

Eligibility was recently expanded to include nearly all health-care workers, including those who do not provide direct patient care. All people who work in congregate living facilities are also able to get vaccinated.

Dr. Joss Reimer, medical lead of the province’s vaccine task force, has said inoculations could be open to all adults in the province by August if supplies are steady. There are supersites in cities where people can get vaccines and pop-up clinics have begun in rural and northern Manitoba communities for people who are eligible.

Health officials say the province has capacity to deliver 20,000 doses each day, but are currently hindered by limited supply.

Manitoba has already indicated it would opt for a four-month interval between doses.

The military is also being deployed to northern Manitoba to help vaccination efforts in 23 remote First Nations. Up to 200 members will help set up sites, transport people and administer doses. The goal is to vaccinate 100,000 First Nations people in 100 days.

To date, 146,529 doses of vaccine have been administered including 99,091 first doses and 47,438 second doses.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority is booking vaccinations for residents aged 62 and older. The minimum age drops to 50 for people living in the Far North.

Those deemed to be medically vulnerable and have underlying health conditions can also get a shot, but have to wait to receive a letter first. Priority health-care workers are also on the list.

The province plans to open more drive-thru vaccination clinics once its receives the next shipment of Oxford-AstraZeneca shots. To date, the province has done around 144,000 vaccinations.

Alberta 

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans aged 18 and over a first dose of vaccine by the end of June.

On March 15, residents aged 65 to 74, and First Nations, Inuit and Metis aged 50-plus, were allowed to begin booking. The province had originally not expected to begin this stage of vaccination until April.

In April, the Alberta government aims to start offering the vaccine to people with some chronic health conditions born between 1957 and 2005. That includes people with certain lung, kidney, liver and heart diseases, people treated for cancer in the past year, those with severe mental illness and substance use disorders, and pregnant women.

After that, vaccines will be available to more health-care workers and people with jobs in certain congregate living settings, such as jails and homeless shelters. Meat plant workers will also qualify in this phase.

Alberta has also said it will follow other provinces by extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months.

British Columbia

The B.C. government is accelerating the timeline for the COVID-19 vaccine once again, allowing people who are “extremely clinically vulnerable” and some seniors to book their shots earlier than expected.

The Ministry of Health says that people at higher risk from COVID-19 due to existing medical conditions, including transplant recipients and those with cancer and severe respiratory conditions, will be able to register for their vaccine beginning Monday.

This group of people was originally scheduled to receive their shots in Phase 3 starting in April, but Health Minister Adrian Dix said the province has made tremendous progress on its age-based program and has additional vaccine supply.

The government said the new timeline means that about 200,000 people in B.C. aged 16 years or older who are clinically extremely vulnerable will receive their first dose of vaccine in the coming weeks.

The province has also announced a partnership with 14 businesses in the tourism and hospitality sectors that have been hit hard by the pandemic to use more than 1,400 laid-off workers to provide non-clinical help with the COVID-19 immunization rollout.

Nunavut

Nunavut’s priority populations are being vaccinated first. They include residents of shelters, people aged 60 years and up, staff and inmates at correctional facilities, first responders and front-line health-care staff.

After a COVID-19 vaccine is administered, patients will be tracked to ensure they are properly notified to receive their second dose.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories says it expects to finish its vaccine rollout by the end of April. It also expects to receive enough doses of the Moderna vaccine by the end of March to inoculate 75 per cent of the adult population.

Yukon

Yukon says it will receive enough vaccine to immunize 75 per cent of its adult population by the end of March.

Priority for vaccinations has been given to residents and staff in long-term care homes, group homes and shelters, as well as health-care workers and personal support workers. People over the age of 80 who are not living in long-term care, and those living in rural and remote communities, including Indigenous Peoples, are also on the priority list for shots.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Thursday, March 25, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Thursday, March 25, 2021.

There are 946,370 confirmed cases in Canada.

<b>_ Canada: 946,370 confirmed cases (37,100 active, 886,511 resolved, 22,759 deaths).<sup>*</sup>The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.</b>

There were 4,051 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 97.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 27,121 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,874.

There were 24 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 203 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 29. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.88 per 100,000 people.

There have been 26,858,481 tests completed.

<b>_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,015 confirmed cases (seven active, 1,002 resolved, six deaths).</b>

There was one new case Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 1.34 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been two new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 216,291 tests completed.

<b>_ Prince Edward Island: 152 confirmed cases (eight active, 144 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 5.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 120,957 tests completed.

<b>_ Nova Scotia: 1,696 confirmed cases (24 active, 1,606 resolved, 66 deaths).</b>

There were five new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 2.45 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 22 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 405,288 tests completed.

<b>_ New Brunswick: 1,517 confirmed cases (64 active, 1,423 resolved, 30 deaths).</b>

There were 12 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 8.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 40 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is six.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 255,565 tests completed.

<b>_ Quebec: 304,490 confirmed cases (6,918 active, 286,946 resolved, 10,626 deaths).</b>

There were 783 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 80.68 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,040 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 720.

There were eight new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 57 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is eight. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 123.92 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,896,641 tests completed.

<b>_ Ontario: 333,690 confirmed cases (15,047 active, 311,380 resolved, 7,263 deaths).</b>

There were 1,571 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 102.12 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,734 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,676.

There were 10 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 76 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.29 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,999,939 tests completed.

<b>_ Manitoba: 33,591 confirmed cases (1,261 active, 31,401 resolved, 929 deaths).</b>

There were 81 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 91.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 597 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 85.

There were zero new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 67.35 per 100,000 people.

There have been 574,512 tests completed.

<b>_ Saskatchewan: 32,181 confirmed cases (1,565 active, 30,196 resolved, 420 deaths).</b>

There were 190 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 132.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,211 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 173.

There was one new reported death Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 35.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 635,569 tests completed.

<b>_ Alberta: 143,547 confirmed cases (6,534 active, 135,040 resolved, 1,973 deaths).</b>

There were 692 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 147.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,925 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 561.

There were two new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.05 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.62 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,602,756 tests completed.

<b>_ British Columbia: 93,969 confirmed cases (5,671 active, 86,857 resolved, 1,441 deaths).</b>

There were 716 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 110.17 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,542 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 649.

There were three new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 30 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.99 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,117,078 tests completed.

<b>_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one death).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,443 tests completed.

<b>_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,664 tests completed.

<b>_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,702 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How the condo amenity wars are changing Canadian cities

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, a long time ago, an amenity in a condo was limited to things like a pool, a gym or maybe a patio. Now, as units grow smaller and developers court buyers, they’ve become more and more luxurious. You want a rock-climbing wall? Access to communal BMWs? A rooftop running track that lights up at night? A full library and study area? No problem.

But what happens when many of the services that used to belong to the neighbourhood become accessible to condo owners only? If nobody uses the neighbourhood pool, or library, or running track—because they already have a private one in their building—how long do cities fund those things? What does a downtown look like where every development is built to be self-contained, and nothing is made for everyone to access?

GUEST: Aaron Hutchins, Maclean’s

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, March 24, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 24th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

There are 942,320 confirmed cases in Canada.

<b>_ Canada: 942,320 confirmed cases (36,310 active, 883,275 resolved, 22,735 deaths).<sup>*</sup>The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.</b>

There were 3,601 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 95.54 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 26,455 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,779.

There were 19 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 217 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 31. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.82 per 100,000 people.

There have been 26,778,301 tests completed.

<b>_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,014 confirmed cases (six active, 1,002 resolved, six deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 1.15 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 215,955 tests completed.

<b>_ Prince Edward Island: 152 confirmed cases (eight active, 144 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were two new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 5.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 120,529 tests completed.

<b>_ Nova Scotia: 1,691 confirmed cases (21 active, 1,604 resolved, 66 deaths).</b>

There was one new case Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.14 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 19 new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 403,532 tests completed.

<b>_ New Brunswick: 1,505 confirmed cases (57 active, 1,418 resolved, 30 deaths).</b>

There were seven new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 7.29 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 29 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 254,812 tests completed.

<b>_ Quebec: 303,707 confirmed cases (6,742 active, 286,347 resolved, 10,618 deaths).</b>

There were 656 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 78.63 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,960 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 709.

There were four new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 61 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 123.83 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,870,617 tests completed.

<b>_ Ontario: 332,119 confirmed cases (15,017 active, 309,849 resolved, 7,253 deaths).</b>

There were 1,546 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 101.92 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,671 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,667.

There were nine new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 80 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.23 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,967,383 tests completed.

<b>_ Manitoba: 33,511 confirmed cases (1,247 active, 31,335 resolved, 929 deaths).</b>

There were 93 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 90.41 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 611 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 87.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 67.35 per 100,000 people.

There have been 572,807 tests completed.

<b>_ Saskatchewan: 31,991 confirmed cases (1,472 active, 30,100 resolved, 419 deaths).</b>

There were 149 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 124.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,108 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 158.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 35.55 per 100,000 people.

There have been 632,360 tests completed.

<b>_ Alberta: 142,855 confirmed cases (6,231 active, 134,653 resolved, 1,971 deaths).</b>

There were 465 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 140.91 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,712 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 530.

There were three new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 19 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.57 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,595,428 tests completed.

<b>_ British Columbia: 93,253 confirmed cases (5,508 active, 86,307 resolved, 1,438 deaths).</b>

There were 682 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 107 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,324 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 618.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 31 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,111,072 tests completed.

<b>_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one death).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,437 tests completed.

<b>_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,596 tests completed.

<b>_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 1.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,697 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 24, 2021.

The Canadian Press

B.C. Premier John Horgan to announce partnerships in COVID immunization plan

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 24th, 2021

VICTORIA — British Columbia Premier John Horgan and Dr. Penny Ballem, the lead on the provincial COVID-19 immunization team, are to reveal more information today on the vaccine rollout.

A government release says they will be announcing new partnerships for the immunization plan.

Health officials announced yesterday that another 200,000 people who have serious medical conditions would be able to book a shot sooner than expected, starting on Monday.

Health Minister Adrian Dix says “tremendous progress” has been made in the age-based vaccine program, allowing the government to move those who are at increased health risk up in the queue.

People with various forms of cancer, transplant recipients, those with severe respiratory problems, kidney disease and other conditions will get a letter in the mail to take to their appointment.

The age-based schedule is also being accelerated with those age 76 and up able to book starting at noon today.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 24, 2021.

The Canadian Press

WestJet restoring suspended flights for Atlantic Canada, Quebec City in June

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 24th, 2021

WestJet says it is restoring flights to several regional destinations in Eastern Canada that were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The airline says it will resume flying to Charlottetown, Fredericton, Moncton, Sydney, N.S., and Quebec City.

WestJet suspended service to the five cities in November.

The flights are to resume over six days beginning June 24.

In addition, service between St. John’s, N.L., and Toronto will resume June 24 — after flights were suspended in October.

A restart of service between St. John’s, N.L., and Halifax will also be moved up to May 6 from the previous target of June 24.

Trudeau calls University of Ottawa professor’s remarks ‘Quebec bashing’

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 23rd, 2021

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s had enough of “Quebec bashing” following controversial remarks from a University of Ottawa professor.

At a press conference Monday, he and Quebec Premier François Legault said they were disappointed the institution’s president opted not to condemn online comments from law professor Amir Attaran, who claims the province is led by “a white supremacist government” and too tolerant of racism.

The two leaders weighed in after the University of Ottawa opted not to apologize to the Parti Québécois for Attaran’s posts.

Jacques Frémont, the university’s president, said in a letter to PQ leader Paul Saint-Pierre Plamondon on Sunday that the institution does not share Attaran’s opinions, but that they were were posted on his personal social media account and thus not subject to sanction, as course lectures might be.

The PQ leader had asked for an apology following recent remarks from Attaran, who on Twitter has called Quebec’s culture racist, dubbed it the Alabama of the north and accused Quebec nurses of “medical lynching” in regard to Joyce Echaquan, a 37-year-old Indigenous woman who died in a Quebec hospital in 2020.

In the House of Commons on Monday, Bloc Québécois MP Alain Therrien said the posts — and the university’s response — demonstrate Quebecers are a minority that remains subject to “hate speech without any consequences.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 22, 2021.

The Canadian Press

RCMP breached policy on collection of online information: audit

JIM BRONSKILL, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 23rd, 2021

An internal review says the RCMP routinely flouted its own policies when gathering information from the internet, potentially endangering investigations and prosecutions.

The newly released audit report says many members across the RCMP use “open source information” in the course of investigations, intelligence gathering, research and engaging with the public.

The national police force’s efforts in the open-source realm range from passive online reading to creation of fake social media accounts.

A section of the Mountie operational manual provides a framework for the collection and use of open source material.

However, the audit found that many employees were unaware that an open-source policy existed or that it applied to their activities.

Overall, the reviewers concluded that internet-related open-source activities conducted across the RCMP “were not consistent nor compliant with” the operational policy.

In a response included in the report, RCMP management agreed with recommendations to improve compliance with policy, training and oversight concerning open-source information.

“We recognize that proper training, support, and in particular the organization’s approach to governance around this function is critical.”

In December, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki acknowledged the inadequacy of the force’s data-handling practices in her response to a watchdog report on Mountie surveillance of opponents of the now-defunct Northern Gateway pipeline project.

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP said the force should provide clear policy guidance on collection of personal information from open sources such as social media sites, the uses that can be made of it and what steps should be taken to ensure its reliability.

The commission also said the RCMP should treat such information from social media sources as a separate category of records — data that should be kept no longer than strictly necessary.

In the latest report, the auditors found that roles and responsibilities related to the police force’s open-source information policy were not well understood by employees.

“Without clearly established and communicated roles and responsibilities, there is a risk that OSI will be inappropriately obtained and used in support of criminal investigations and criminal intelligence gathering, which can expose the Force to liability and potentially impact prosecutions,” the report says.

The auditors found most of the RCMP’s open source research was done passively, involving no interaction with subjects of interest.

But they noticed some exceptions that were contrary to policy, “such as joining closed Facebook groups in a proactive monitoring effort to obtain information on upcoming events such as a protest or demonstration from online discussions, and using personal social media accounts to overtly try to contact a missing person.”

The RCMP devised a standard form for the creation, modification and removal of discreet online identities, such as fake social media accounts.

A key purpose of the form is to allow RCMP to determine if a subject of interest is actually another police officer. It is also intended to help flag cases where an online identity or account has been compromised and should no longer be used.

However, an audit sample of 110 employees determined that only six per cent had properly completed the form with the required approvals.

Employees from various RCMP divisions also told the auditors no consistent process was in place to remove a discreet online identity when an employee leaves a unit.

In addition, the RCMP policy did not include specific information on how to capture, store and retain open source information gathered by the police force.

Page 21 of 95« First...10...1920212223...304050...Last »