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How Canada-China relations became strained to the breaking point

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Apr 1st, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, it ramped up with Canada’s detention of a Huawei executive, and China’s retaliatory detention of two Canadian citizens. But it didn’t begin there. And tensions are not likely to end if and when Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, or Meng Wanzhou, are released.

The truth is, the diplomatic relationship between us and the emerging superpower has been decaying for years, and the past six months has only added fuel to the fire. But as Canada stands up to human rights abuses and claims of genocide by China’s government…should we even want to improve them? If we did, what would it take? And can we rely on our allies if China decides to flex its muscles on us?

GUEST: Stephanie Carvin, Assoc. Prof. of International Affairs, Carleton University

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

General Contest Rules

Kyle Mack | posted Thursday, Apr 1st, 2021

BREAKFAST TELEVISION (“BT”)

1. Application. These rules apply to contests operated by Rogers Media Inc. (“Rogers”) for BT, excluding those contests for which specific rules have been developed (in which case those specific rules will apply). By entering a contest governed by these rules (a “Contest”), entrants agree to be bound by these rules, and will be deemed to have received and understood these rules.

2. Eligibility. Unless otherwise stated, (a) be a legal resident of Canada (excluding residents of Quebec) (b) who has reached the age of majority in their province or territory of residence as of the date of entry. In respect of a particular Contest, the following individuals are not eligible to participate: (a) employees, officers, directors, agents, and representatives of (i) Rogers and its parent and affiliated companies, (ii) the applicable prize supplier(s), (iii) the applicable Contest judges (if any), and (iv) any and all other companies associated with the Contest; (b) individuals who have won a BT contest in the three months prior to the commencement of the applicable Contest; and (c) those with whom the foregoing individuals reside.

3. Proof of Identity. Rogers shall have the right at any time to require proof of identity and/or eligibility to participate in a Contest. Failure to provide such proof may result in disqualification. All personal and other information requested by and supplied to Rogers for the purpose of a Contest must be truthful, complete, accurate and in no way misleading. Rogers reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to disqualify any entrant should such entrant at any stage supply untruthful, incomplete, inaccurate or misleading personal details and/or information.

4. Contest Period & Prizing. Details of the prize(s) available to be won, the start and end dates, the start and end times, and any other relevant information will be identified at the time of the Contest by means of applicable promotional materials, by means of the website at www.breakfasttelevision.ca (the “Website”), and/or by means of any of the official social networking pagesfor BT. The approximate retail value of a prize is available upon request during the particular Contest entry period. Prizes must be accepted as awarded, without substitution, transfer, exchange or assignment, unless otherwise determined in the sole discretion of Rogers and/or the prize supplier(s). Prizes are provided “as is” without further representation, warranty, or guarantee of any kind, whether express or implied. Rogers and/or the prize supplier(s) reserve(s) the right, in their sole discretion, to substitute a prize or a component of a prize with a prize or a component of a prize (as applicable) of equal or greater value, including, without limitation, a monetary award, if the prize or prize component cannot be awarded by Rogers and/or the prize supplier(s) for any reason. Prizes may not be exactly as advertised.

5. How to Enter. No purchase necessary. Unless otherwise stated, there is a limit of one entry per person per Contest. Entry mechanism(s) in respect of a particular Contest will be noted by means of applicable promotional materials, via the Website, by Rogers’s representatives, and/or by means of any of the official social networking pages for BT. One or several of the following entry mechanisms may be applicable to any given Contest:

A. Online Entry: To enter a Contest by means of the Website, go to the Website during the applicable Contest entry period and click on the Contest banners, buttons and/or links to access the online entry form for the Contest. During the applicable entry period, complete the online entry form as instructed, including all required information. Incomplete entries will be deemed void. By successfully transmitting a completed entry as directed, you will be entered in the Contest.

B. Call-in Entry: To enter a Contest by means of call-in entry, dial the telephone number provided by the on-air BT host when prompted and be the correct caller, as determined pursuant to instructions given by the host (e.g. be the correct sequential caller). Once determined to be the correct caller, you may be required to follow the instructions of a Rogers representative to validate your eligibility (e.g. answer trivia questions).

C. Email Entry: To enter a Contest by means of email entry, follow instructions to send an email to the email address provided by the on-air BT host when prompted, subject to any content requirements as noted by the on-air host.

D. Social Media Entry: For Contests with entry via one or several social networking pages or services, entry must be effected during the applicable entry period and by means of the applicable third party service or site (each, a “Third Party Service”), pursuant to instructions provided by BT (by means of any of its official social networking pages, via promotional materials, via the Website, and/or by Rogers’s representatives). To enter a Contest by means of a Third Party Service, you must have a valid account with the applicable Third Party Service and you may be required to have a public (i.e. non-private) account. By creating an account with a Third Party Service, you agree to comply with the Third Party Service’s terms and policies.

Although Contests may be communicated, promoted, or administered by means of a Third Party Service, all entrants acknowledge that Contests are in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, any Third Party Service and that any questions, comments or complaints regarding a Contest should be directed to Rogers and not to any Third Party Service. By participating in any Contest, you completely release any Third Party Service of all liability in relation to any injury, damage or loss that may occur, directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, from your participation. In addition to the foregoing, unless explicitly stated, Contests are in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Apple.

6. Restrictions: Entrant Submissions. From time to time, a Contest entry mechanism may require you to submit (whether via Internet upload or otherwise) an original photograph, video, or written submission (collectively or individually, the “Creative Material”) to Rogers, subject to instructions provided by Rogers or its representatives. By entering a Contest requiring a Creative Material submission, you represent and warrant that your Creative Material (a) is original to you, and that you have all necessary rights (including, without limitation, copyright) in and to the Creative Material to enter the Contest; (b) does not include content that is defamatory, libelous, pornographic or obscene; and (c) does not contain, depict, include, or involve, (i) nudity, (ii) explicit, graphic or excessive sexual activity, (iii) crude, vulgar or offensive language and/or symbols, (iv) derogatory characterizations of any ethnic, racial, sexual or religious groups, (v) content that endorses, condones and/or pertains to any illegal, inappropriate or high risk activity, behaviour or conduct, (vi) personal information of individuals, including, without limitation, names and addresses (physical or electronic), without the consent of those individuals, (vii) commercial messages, comparisons or solicitations for products or services, (viii) any materially identifiable third party products and/or trade-marks, brands or logos (materiality to be determined by Rogers in its sole discretion), or (ix) any other content that is, or could reasonably be considered to be, inappropriate, unsuitable or offensive, as determined by Rogers in its sole discretion. You further understand and agree that any Creative Material submitted with an entry may not be returned to you upon submission to the Contest, and may be refused as entry to a particular Contest in the absolute discretion of Rogers. By entering a Contest requiring a Creative Material submission, you grant to Rogers a worldwide, perpetual, royalty-free, irrevocable, non-exclusive and unlimited licence to use your entry, including the Creative Material, in any media and for any purpose related to the Contest, and waive all claims of copyright and moral rights in the Creative Material, and any rights that you may have to compensation, pertaining to any use, reproduction, modification, adaptation, translation, alteration of, or creation of derivative works from, the Creative Material by Rogers for any purpose and in any media whatsoever. You further agree to indemnify and hold harmless each of the Releasees (defined below) from and against any and all claims or actions brought by a person whose consent was not obtained by you, or by any person claiming that his/her/its intellectual property rights, moral rights or personality or privacy rights are infringed by the Creative Material or by Rogers’s use of the Creative Material in accordance with these rules.

7. Ineligible Attempts at Entry. Any attempt or suspected attempt to enter a Contest in a fashion not authorized by these rules (or by Rogers or its representatives) shall be deemed to be tampering and will void all of your entries. Entries that contain false information and/or are late, lost, stolen, falsified, illegible, damaged, misdirected, mutilated, garbled or incomplete, altered or otherwise irregular or entries that have been submitted using robotic, automated, programmed, or through illicit means, or that do not conform with or satisfy any or all of these rules, as determined in Rogers’s sole discretion, will be judged null and void and disqualified. Only entries received by Rogers will be considered. Proof of entry transmission shall not constitute proof of receipt. The sole determinant of time for valid online entry in a Contest will be the Website server machine(s).

8. Draw. For Contests where a winner is selected from entries received, a random draw will be made by a representative of Rogers from all qualifying entries received by the Contest deadline. A selected entrant will be disqualified and required to forfeit any claim on the Contest prize if he or she cannot be reached within a reasonable time period, as determined in the discretion of Rogers, or if these rules are not adhered to. Decisions and rulings of Rogers or its representatives are final and binding without appeal in all matters related to Contests and the awarding of prizes.

9. Conditions of Winning. To be declared a winner, a selected entrant must correctly answer without assistance of any kind, whether mechanical or otherwise, a time-limited, mathematical skill-testing question; be in full compliance with these rules; and, in the discretion of Rogers, sign and return a release of liability and consent to publicity form and any other documentation as may reasonably be required by Rogers in its sole discretion.

10. Prize Acceptance. A selected entrant may be required to provide proof of identification when claiming a prize or otherwise in connection with a Contest to facilitate the administration of the Contest and/or to ensure the accurate identification of a Contest winner. Once confirmation of a Contest winner is complete in accordance with the terms of these rules, Rogers and/or any prize supplier(s) will promptly coordinate prize distribution.

11. Odds of Winning. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received for a particular Contest, and any criteria used to describe how to enter the Contest.

12. Privacy. By entering a Contest and for the sole purpose of Rogers’s administration of the Contest, you consent to the collection, use and disclosure of your personal information by Rogers in accordance with the Rogers Media Privacy Policy, available at www.rogersmedia.com/privacy. Online entrants may be given the option to receive commercial emails and/or other communications from Rogers or other parties; however, eligibility to participate in any Contest is not dependent upon an entrant’s consent to receive any such emails and communications, and consenting to receiving such emails and communications will not impact an entrant’s chances of winning. Rogers will not send informational or marketing communications to entrants, unless entrants expressly consent to receive such communications through an opt-in mechanism.Entrants may at any time opt out of receiving such materials by following the unsubscribe instructions provided at the bottom of any of these communications. Please consult the Rogers Media Privacy Policy referenced above for further information on how Rogers collects, uses, and discloses personal information. Any questions or concerns with respect to communications from Rogers may be addressed to the Rogers Chief Privacy Officer, whose contact particulars may be found in the Rogers Media Privacy Policy. Where you elect to receive informational or marketing communications from a party other than Rogers, you understand and agree that your personal information will be shared with such other party for the purpose of facilitating the sending of informational or marketing communications, and you further understand and agree that your personal information, as shared with the other party, will be subject to the other party’s privacy policy and information handling standards and practices.In connection with prize fulfillment, Rogers may be required to provide your personal information to another party, including, but not limited to, any Contest sponsor or prize supplier. By entering a Contest, you consent to such disclosure of your personal information in connection with the foregoing, and you understand and agree that, should your personal information be provided to another party, your information will be subject to that party’s privacy policy and information handling standards and practices. You further acknowledge and agree that, where you enter a Contest by means of a Third Party Service, any personal information that you share with, or by means of, such Third Party Service may also be used by the applicable social networking service in accordance with its own privacy policy.

13. Release of Liability and Consent to Publicity. By entering a Contest, each entrant accepts and agrees to (i) be legally bound by these rules, including all eligibility requirements, (ii) be bound by the decisions of Rogers and its representatives or the independent judging organization, if any, which are final, binding and conclusive (without appeal) on all matters relative to the Contest; and (iii) waive any and all claims against Rogers, its parent and affiliated companies, the Contest prize suppliers, the Contest judges (if applicable), any and all other companies associated with the Contest, and all of their respective employees, officers, directors, agents, representatives, shareholders, successors and assigns (collectively, the “Releasees”) for any injury, damage, or loss that may occur, directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, from his/her participation or attempted participation in the Contest or from the receipt or use or misuse of any prize or any travel or activity related to the receipt or use of any prize. By accepting a Contest prize, each winner authorizes Rogers and its designees to use in any related publicity the winner’s name, city and province/territory of residence, photograph, image, likeness, voice, and any statements he/she may make regarding such Contest prize for advertising and promotional purposes worldwide in perpetuity, in any form of media including the Internet, without limitation and without additional compensation or consideration, permission or notification, unless prohibited by law; and each winner waives any rights that may exist in respect of materials produced pursuant to the foregoing.

14. Limitation of Liability. The Releasees are not responsible for (i) stolen, late, incomplete, illegible, inaccurate, misdirected, lost, misrouted, scrambled, damaged, delayed, undelivered, mutilated, postage-due or garbled entries, transmissions, email or mail; (ii) lost, interrupted or unavailable network, cable, satellite, server, Internet Service Provider, website, or other connections, including those through and/or by any website; (iii) jumbled, scrambled, delayed, or misdirected transmissions or computer hardware or software malfunctions, failures or difficulties; (iv) failures or malfunctions of phones, phone lines or telephone systems, any error, omission, interruption, defect or delay in transmission, processing, or communication; (v) non-delivered, misdirected, blocked, or delayed email notifications; (vi) printing, typographical or other errors appearing within these rules, in any Contest-related advertisements or other materials; or (vi) any other errors, problems or difficulties of any kind, whether human, mechanical, electronic, network, computer, telephone, mail, typographical, printing or otherwise relating to or in connection with a Contest, including, without limitation, errors or difficulties which may occur in connection with the administration of the Contest, the processing of entries, the announcement of the prize or in any Contest-related materials, or the cancellation or postponement of any event. The Releasees are also not responsible for any incorrect or inaccurate information, whether caused by Website users, tampering, hacking, or by any equipment or programming associated with or utilized in a Contest. The Releasees are not responsible for injury or damage to participants’ or to any other person’s computer related to or resulting from participation in a Contest or downloading materials from or use of the Website.

15. Laws and Rules. Except as otherwise set forth above, Contests will be run in accordance with these rules, which are subject to amendment by Rogers without notice or liability to you. Contests are subject to all applicable federal, provincial and municipal laws and regulations. These rules are governed exclusively by the laws of the province or territory in which you reside, and you submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of such province or territory. Rights and remedies may vary by province or territory.

16. Cancel and Amend. Rogers reserves the right to cancel, modify, or suspend any Contest or to amend these rules at any time and in any way, without prior notice, for any reason whatsoever. Without limiting the foregoing, if for any reason a Contest is not capable of running as originally planned, for example as a result of tampering or infection by computer virus, bug, corruption, security breach, or other cause beyond the reasonable control of Rogers, Rogers reserves the right to cancel or suspend the Contest and/or conduct a random draw from all previously received eligible entries.

17. Conduct. Rogers reserves the right, in its sole and absolute discretion, to disqualify without notice any entrant that it finds to be: violating these rules; tampering or attempting to tamper with the entry process or the operation of a Contest or the Website; acting in an unsportsmanlike or disruptive manner, or with the intent to annoy, abuse, threaten or harass any other person; or attempting to undermine the legitimate operation of a Contest. Any attempt by an entrant or any other individual to undermine the legitimate operation of a Contest may be a violation of criminal and/or civil laws. Should any such attempt be made, Rogers reserves the right to seek remedies and damages to the fullest extent permitted by law, including criminal prosecution, and to ban or disqualify an entrant from the applicable Contest and any future contests.

18. Identity of an Online Entrant. If a dispute arises regarding the identity of any loyalty club entrant, social media entrant, or other online entrant, the applicable entry will be deemed to have been submitted by the authorized account holder of the account provided at the time of entry. An entrant may be required to provide proof that he or she is the authorized account holder of the account associated with a particular entry. The individual assigned by an Internet access provider, online service provider, or other organization responsible for assigning the applicable type of account is considered the authorized account holder. Whether or not an individual constitutes the authorized account holder in question will be determined by Rogers in its sole discretion; and, if the name of the authorized account holder does not accord with the full name provided at the time of entry, the applicable entry may be disqualified at Rogers’s sole and absolute discretion.

Ever Given: The stuck boat that was both a crisis and a comedy

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, Mar 31st, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, its name is the Ever Given. It will forever be a part of the history of this odd time. And when it lodged itself horizontally in the Suez Canal last week, it launched a thousand memes—but also brought global shipping and supply chains to the brink of disaster.

How could such a simple screwup cause so many problems? What could have gone wrong? What did the Stuck Boat Disaster teach us all about the fragility of both supply chains and human planning? And, uh, why was it so funny?

GUEST: Lori Ann LaRocco Author of Trade War: Containers Don’t Lie, Navigating the Bluster, trade columnist for FreightWaves, reporting on the Ever Given for CNBC

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Quebecers to hold events ahead of Easter holiday to honour female victims of violence

VIRGINIE ANN, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 31st, 2021

MONTREAL — Several events are taking place across Quebec ahead of the Easter holiday to honour the memories of the women who have recently died in the province from domestic assault.

The association of Quebec bishops, Assemblee des eveques catholiques du Quebec, is inviting churches across the province to ring their bells today to remember the seven women allegedly killed by their partners since the start of the year.

Women’s shelters are inviting citizens to gather across Quebec for protest marches on Friday in support of victims of domestic violence and to pressure the government to invest more money into services for domestic abuse victims.

And on Saturday, the family of 29-year-old Rebekah Harry, who died on March 23 from injuries resulting from an alleged attack by her boyfriend, is organizing a march in Montreal to honour her memory.

On Tuesday, the sister of a Quebec woman found dead in a remote village in the province’s northern Nunavik region last week says Kataluk Paningayak-Naluiyuk, 43, was the latest victim of domestic violence in the province.

Provincial police say they are waiting for autopsy results before they release more information.

Sabrina Di Matteo, with the association of Quebec bishops, says the timing is right to take a symbolic gesture and ring church bells.

“There’s currently a lot of pressure, social and politically,” Di Matteo said in an interview Tuesday. “Seven femicides in seven weeks, it deeply shook us.”

Harry’s brother, Teddy Frenette, read the names of seven women killed this year by their partners, during a news conference on Monday.

“No man should ever put their hands on women,” Frenette said. “We hear the stories but we choose to close our eyes and we think it can never happen to me, can never happen to my mother, can never happen to my sister, or my friend.”

Brandon McIntyre, 32, was charged Monday with second-degree murder in connection with Harry’s death.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on March 31, 2021.

Virginie Ann, The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on March 30, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 30th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday March 30, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 187,207 new vaccinations administered for a total of 5,300,964 doses given. Nationwide, 672,214 people or 1.8 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 13,986.979 per 100,000.

There were 16,400 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 6,223,930 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 85.17 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland is reporting 9,178 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 55,231 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 105.477 per 1,000. In the province, 1.82 per cent (9,527) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 84,280 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 65.53 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 3,479 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 20,258 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 127.707 per 1,000. In the province, 3.87 per cent (6,139) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 27,205 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 17 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 74.46 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 31,158 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 89,194 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 91.397 per 1,000. In the province, 2.49 per cent (24,344) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 154,630 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 57.68 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 26,987 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 90,182 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 115.612 per 1,000. In the province, 1.57 per cent (12,223) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 123,115 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 73.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 38,971 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,261,855 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 147.471 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 1,380,295 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 91.42 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 50,453 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,031,735 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 138.316 per 1,000. In the province, 2.12 per cent (311,248) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 2,353,665 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.32 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 5,026 new vaccinations administered for a total of 173,548 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 126.033 per 1,000. In the province, 3.99 per cent (54,943) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 248,180 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 18 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.93 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 6,104 new vaccinations administered for a total of 179,800 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 152.482 per 1,000. In the province, 3.16 per cent (37,225) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 188,025 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.63 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 13,309 new vaccinations administered for a total of 608,032 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 138.125 per 1,000. In the province, 2.22 per cent (97,561) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 697,415 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 87.18 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 61,236 new vaccinations administered for a total of 699,092 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 136.233 per 1,000. In the province, 1.70 per cent (87,289) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 16,400 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 826,620 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.57 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 556 new vaccinations administered for a total of 34,381 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 823.872 per 1,000. In the territory, 26.18 per cent (10,924) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 51,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 66.89 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting 2,258 new vaccinations administered for a total of 37,655 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 834.571 per 1,000. In the territory, 30.88 per cent (13,933) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 51,600 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 110 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 72.97 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 332 new vaccinations administered for a total of 20,001 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 516.475 per 1,000. In the territory, 17.71 per cent (6,858) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 37,500 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 97 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 53.34 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 30, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canada’s invisible victims of femicide

THE BIG STORY | posted Tuesday, Mar 30th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, Picture the last story you read or heard about a woman killed by a man. Where did she live? How old was she? Why did you picture it that way?

With much of 2020 spent under stay-at-home orders, it’s not a surprise that Canada saw a jump in femicide. But what is surprising is what we do and don’t do about it. And which stories get told. This is the pandemic you haven’t been hearing about.

GUEST: Julie Lalonde, speaker and educator, women’s rights advocate, author of Resilience Is Futile

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Canadians far more wary of AstraZeneca than other COVID-19 vaccines: Poll

JOAN BRYDEN, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Mar 30th, 2021

Canadians are much more wary about being injected with the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine than they are about receiving other vaccines approved for use in Canada, a new poll suggests.

Just 53 per cent of respondents to the poll, conducted by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies, said they would trust the AstraZeneca vaccine being given to themselves or family members to immunize them against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

That was far less than the 82 per cent who said they’d trust being injected with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine or the 77 per cent who said the same about the Moderna vaccine.

AstraZeneca also fared worse compared to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which has been approved but is not yet available in Canada. Sixty-nine per cent expressed trust in the J and J option.

The online poll of 1,523 adult Canadians was conducted March 26-28, just before the latest controversy erupted involving the trouble-plagued AstraZeneca vaccine. It cannot be assigned a margin of error because internet-based polls are not considered random samples.


RELATED: NACI recommends halting AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for those under 55


On Monday, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommended that AstraZeneca not be used on people under the age of 55. That was in response to reports that some three dozen patients in Europe, primarily younger women, developed blood clots after receiving the vaccine.

That marked the third time NACI has changed its guidance about the use of AstraZeneca.

In late February, the advisory committee said it shouldn’t be used on people over the age of 65, citing an insufficient number of seniors involved in clinical trials. Two weeks later, NACI retracted that advice, based on real-world evidence of AstraZeneca’s effectiveness in seniors.

The poll suggests wariness about AstraZeneca hasn’t so far made Canadians more hesitant about getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

Seventy-eight per cent of respondents said they intend to get vaccinated, continuing a slow but steady upward trend since last October, when 63 per cent planned to get immunized.

Moreover, 58 per cent said they’d take the first vaccine available, up 30 percentage points since November. Another 24 per cent said they’d wait for other vaccines to become available.

Canadians answer what they think post-COVID-19 life will look like in new survey

STEPHANIE TAYLOR, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Mar 29th, 2021

REGINA — New research suggests that while Canadians feel COVID-19 will have negative consequences on mental health and the economy, they feel it will be good for online shopping and public mask-wearing once the pandemic is over.

The findings are from a phone survey by the Canadian Hub for Applied and Social Research at the University of Saskatchewan.

It asked about 1,000 people during the first two weeks of March what kind of long-term impacts they thought the health crisis would have on different areas of life.

“Given that vaccinations are now starting to roll out … people are starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel,” said research director Jason Disano.

“It seems like a great opportunity to really get a sense of how people are feeling in terms of what life may or may not look like post-COVID.”

Specifically, people were asked to imagine a world where COVID-19 was under control, and to pick whether they thought the virus would have a positive or negative effect or no impact at all on a certain category.

Researchers said the survey had a 3.1 per cent margin of error, plus or minus, 19 times out of 20 nationally.

Some of the results weren’t surprising, said Disano, like those about mental health and well-being.

About 72 per cent of respondents predicted COVID-19 would have a negative effect, compared to 18 per cent who felt it would be positive.

More than 60 per cent also felt pessimistic about how the pandemic will affect the economy and international travel, while 52 per cent said it would be bad for personal finances.

“No one really knows what the economy is going to look like post-pandemic,” said Disano.

He said some of the data he found most interesting were about children’s education. Despite 63 per cent of people feeling like the virus will have positive changes on the delivery of online education, 54 per cent thought it would be bad for children’s learning.

“I do think there’s a bit of concern around — are the students who are either K-12 or post-secondary, are they going to be behind where they could be or should be, at this point in their educational careers?” said Disano.

On the brighter side, he pointed out that 61 per cent of people thought COVID-19 would be good for the willingness of people to wear masks in public after the pandemic.

“I would assume people, when they were responding to this question, were thinking about things like the influenza virus,” said Disano.

“Perhaps masking may become not necessarily widespread, but perhaps more common.”

The survey also said 76 per cent of people felt the pandemic would be positive for online shopping, and 72 per cent reported the same for alternate workplace arrangements.

Opinions on other topics were more mixed. About 37 per cent of people thought there will be both good and bad changes to domestic travel because of the virus, while 23 per cent said they didn’t know.

Overall, Disano said, the research indicates people feel differently about how the pandemic will impact their lives, and there’s a lot of uncertainty about what communities will look like once they are no longer threatened by the virus.

“I think there’s going to be a degree of onus on policy-makers, on politicians, on public-health officials to provide more information to Canadians in terms of what they see post-pandemic Canada looking like.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 29, 2021

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press

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