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Canada expecting to receive 3.3M vaccine doses this week

LEE BERTHIAUME, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Mar 29th, 2021

Canada is scheduled to receive a flood of new COVID-19 vaccine doses this week, with around 3.3 million shots due for delivery from different pharmaceutical companies over the coming days.

The expected influx would mark the single-largest week of deliveries into Canada since the start of the pandemic, thanks to planned shipments from three different sources.

The Public Health Agency of Canada says Pfizer and BioNTech are scheduled to ship nearly 1.2 million doses this week, as the two companies continue pumping out shots at a rapid pace.

The federal government is also expecting around 1.5 million doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the United States on Tuesday, which will arrive by truck and represent the first to come from south of the border.

Canada’s vaccines to date have all come from Europe, with the exception of 500,000 AstraZeneca doses from India earlier this month.

The government also says Moderna will make good on its promised delivery of 600,000 shots this coming Thursday, which is about a week later than expected.

Moderna was supposed to have shipped around 846,000 shots to Canada last week, but only a fraction was actually delivered due to what the company and government have described as a backlog in its quality-assurance testing.

The anticipated flood of new vaccine doses comes as the federal government reported Canada having received more than six million doses as of last week, which was several days earlier than anticipated.

Of those, more than five million had been administered as of Sunday afternoon, according to covid19tracker.ca. More than 11 per cent of the population has now received at least one dose.


RELATED: Health Canada says no corners were cut in approving COVID-19 vaccines


The vaccination campaign is continuing amid mounting concerns about a deadly third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, as variants of the virus continue to spread through different parts of the country.

The federal government is also watching as the European Union and India look at restrictions on exporting vaccines produced within their borders.

“We are closely monitoring the global environment, including export restrictions in a number of jurisdictions,” Public Procurement Minister Anita Anand said on Friday.

“Our officials across numerous departments as well as our suppliers are working ahead of time to ensure that Canada’s vaccines continue to arrive in our country.”

‘A big win for farmers’: Ottawa secures support for AgriStability with modified plans

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 26th, 2021

OTTAWA — The federal government has a new agreement with the provinces that gives upgrades to a program that protects farmers against large declines in income.

Federal Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau hosted a meeting with provincial and territorial agriculture ministers Thursday to discuss planned changes to the AgriStability program that would increase payouts for production losses, increased costs and effects from market conditions.

Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba were the only holdouts going into the meeting.

“We’ve received the support from all our prov. & territorial colleagues on the removal of the Reference Margin Limit from AgriStability, retroactive to 2020!” Bibeau tweeted.

“It’s a big win for farmers across Canada = about $95M/year. Thank you to all farmers & producer groups who got behind our offer.”

Ottawa had proposed last November to eliminate the reference margin limit, which serves to reduce a farmer’s payout and to boost the compensation rate to 80 per cent.

All the provinces agreed to removing the margin limit, but an agreement wasn’t reached on moving to an 80 per cent compensation rate.

“The federal government chose to withhold $75 million in compensation funding for farmers, costing Alberta $12 million per year in federal transfers,” said Alberta Agriculture Minister Devin Dreeshen.

“We are disappointed that the federal government chose to withhold these publicly communicated funds.”

Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Dave Marit said reliable risk management programming is essential to continued growth in the agriculture sector.

“Producers have made it clear that removing the reference margin limit will help the AgriStability program function as intended and make the program more effective and equitable,” Marit said.

Response from the agriculture sector was largely one of relief. But the Canadian Federation of Agriculture is calling on Bibeau to offer its increased compensation rate to supportive provinces.

“For years agriculture groups all across Canada have been telling their governments that these programs would not be sufficient in a real crisis. AgriStability, as a program responding solely to severe income losses, is there to help producers in crisis,” said CFA’s president, Mary Robinson.

“And now, at a time where Canadian agriculture faces immense disruptions and uncertainty, we see critical investments in risk management treated like a political game, with politicians haggling for over 100 days while farmers have real concerns about their livelihoods over the coming year.”

Alberta producer groups, including the Alberta Barley Commission, Alberta Beef Producers, Alberta Canola, Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association and Alberta Pork, also wish the percentage of compensation was higher.

“This portion of the federal offer includes an additional $75 million per year of support for Canadian producers,” the groups said in a release.

“We continue to encourage the provincial and territorial Ministers to consider accepting this part of the proposal, bringing additional support to Canadian farmers and ranchers.”

— By Bill Graveland in Calgary

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Undocumented workers hesitant to get COVID-19 vaccines, fear deportation: advocates

CAMILLE BAINS, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 26th, 2021

Undocumented workers in Canada fear that getting vaccinated could mean being arrested if someone reports them to police or immigration authorities because of their lack of proper identification, say advocates.

Karen Cocq of the Toronto-based Migrant Workers Alliance for Change said undocumented and migrant workers should not be required to provide identification issued in Canada, including a health card, when they are booking appointments or attending clinics as part of a process to track vaccinations.

Cocq said many of the workers already don’t use the health-care system because they’re afraid of losing their jobs if an employer discovers their immigration status so it’s not surprising they’re hesitant to get vaccinated.

“People are very concerned about what happens with their personal information when they share it with any officials or with any authorities,” she said.

“They’ve heard stories about what happens if (the Canada Border Services Agency) is called.”

Cocq said vaccinations could be tracked using government-issued identification from a worker’s home country or, as in the case for some homeless people in Toronto, through other means, such as an email address, a library card or a letter from a food bank or community agency.

People without permanent residency status are often employed as personal support workers or care aides in long-term care facilities, and in sectors like construction and agriculture, mostly in Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

Ontario alone is home to at least 500,000 undocumented workers based on data from 2016, Cocq said. The number is likely much higher now, she said, because of stricter language and education criteria for care workers, for example, which prevents some people from applying for permanent residency.

“Unequal access and barriers to getting the COVID-19 vaccine are a product of a person’s immigration status,” she said.

Anna Maddison, a spokeswoman for the Public Health Agency of Canada, said COVID-19 vaccines are available for everyone without a health card, but logistics involving identification requirements are decided by provincial and territorial governments.

Health ministries in Ontario and British Columbia said undocumented and migrant workers do not need to present medical cards before being vaccinated but they did not say whether non-government identification could be used.

The B.C. Health Ministry said information provided to public health officials for immunization will not be shared with other organizations. More details on the documents that will be asked for will be available when provincewide online registration starts on April 6, it said.

Cocq said the alliance has issued a proposal for various jurisdictions to provide clear information in multiple languages on booking websites about access to vaccinations for everyone, along with an assurance that personal details will not be shared with authorities.

Those policies should also be made available to people booking appointments on phone lines and administering vaccines at clinics so they’re not asking for medical card numbers, she said.

Judy Illes, a professor of neurology at the University of British Columbia and the Canada Research Chair in neuroethics, said governments should quickly develop transparent processes to ensure everyone who wants a vaccine can get one in a safe environment.

“To the extent that new issues are arising, like hesitancy among undocumented workers, that needs to be addressed so there is trust in the system and the chances of discrimination are mitigated as best as possible,” said Illes, who focuses on the ethics of vaccine rollout and access for vulnerable populations.

Byron Cruz, a spokesman for Sanctuary Health in Vancouver, said migrant and undocumented workers are eager to get vaccinated because their jobs put them at risk of being infected with COVID-19 and they often live in small spaces with many people.

“Our concern is that many of the construction workers live in an apartment with two bedrooms and there are sometimes 10 people there. That’s a difficult situation for them,” he said.

The grassroots advocacy group is ready to encourage workers to visit mobile vaccination clinics at their job sites if that option is available, but Cruz said they also need to give assurances that no one would be at risk of being deported based on their immigration status.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 26, 2021.

Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

What does the carbon tax ruling mean?

THE BIG STORY | posted Friday, Mar 26th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, Canada’s Supreme Court issued an historic ruling yesterday, deciding by a 6-3 margin the the federal government does indeed have the power to implement a carbon tax (or a price on pollution) in provinces that don’t set their own. The decision has implications on both sides of the fight, and on how future governments could use this ruling to perhaps expand their powers.

What’s in the ruling, exactly? What does it mean for Canadians, for the climate and for its political opponents? How will it impact the next election, and what will the premiers who fought so hard against it do next?

GUEST: Fatima Syed, for The Narwhal

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Health officials say vaccinations will begin this week for first responders. They say pre-registration for COVID-19 vaccines has opened for people aged 70 or older and for home-support workers.

Newfoundland and Labrador announced March 3 it was extending the interval between the first and second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to four months.

Public health officials said the change will help them vaccinate 40,000 more people with a single dose by the end of March. Liberal Leader and incumbent Premier Andrew Furey said the decision is a game changer for the province’s vaccination prospects.

Nova Scotia

Health officials say people aged 60 to 62 became eligible to receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine starting March 18.

Nova Scotia plans to have vaccine available to at least 75 per cent of the population by the end of September 2021.

The province is planning to use mobile van clinics to vaccinate about 900 people who work at or use homeless shelters in the Halifax area.

Public health is partnering with pharmacists and doctors to provide the vaccines at 25 locations.

Nova Scotia, meanwhile, has added front-line police officers to the list of people eligible for vaccination during the second phase of the province’s rollout plan, joining groups such as long-haul truck drivers and hospital workers over the age of 60.

Prince Edward Island

Health officials in Prince Edward Island say they will shift their focus to getting a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine to all adults by July 1, even if it means delaying the second shot for some.

The province is offering the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine people ages 18 to 29 who work in gas stations and convenience or grocery stores.

The announcement on March 16 came after the province opened AstraZeneca vaccination appointments a week earlier to young people in the food and beverage sector.

New Brunswick 

Health officials announced March 18 that people 80 and older, health-care professionals who have close contact with patients, and people with complex medical conditions are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 80 and over, a caregiver or a family member acting on their behalf can make an appointment for a vaccine at a pharmacy.

The province says all residents of long-term care homes have been offered at least one dose of vaccine. On Friday, March 19, all residents of First Nations communities who are aged 16 or older will have access to their first dose of vaccine.

Quebec 

Quebec started vaccinating older seniors on March 1 after a first phase that focused largely on health-care workers, remote communities and long-term care. In Montreal, mass vaccine sites, including the Olympic Stadium, opened their doors to the public as the province began inoculating seniors who live in the hard-hit city.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments opened March 10 for residents 70 and older across Quebec. The minimum age is currently set at 65 in Abitibi-Temiscamingue and Cote-Nord. However, Montreal is dropping the age limit to 60.

Premier Francois Legault says his government’s goal is for all adult Quebecers who want a COVID-19 vaccine to get at least one dose by the province’s Fete nationale on June 24. He also said the province’s vaccination campaign will allow all Quebecers aged 65 and over to be vaccinated with one dose by mid-April.

Quebec, meanwhile, is looking to enlist between 20 and 50 companies across the province to operate vaccination hubs to help accelerate its immunization campaign for people under 60.

Health Minister Christian Dube says he’s hoping the companies can administer a total of one million vaccines.

To be part of the program, companies must commit to vaccinating between 15,000 and 25,000 people over a 12-week period between May and August.

Quebec will provide the vaccines and necessary equipment and run the online appointment portal. The program will begin when residents under the age of 60 become eligible to be vaccinated, with a goal of fully vaccinating 500,000 Quebecers.

Ontario

Ontario launched its COVID-19 vaccine booking portal and call centre on March 15.

People aged 80 and older were the first eligible to use the system. Starting March 22, people age 75 and older will be able to make appointments through the booking system.

Ontario focused its initial vaccine effort on those in long-term care, high-risk retirement home residents, some health-care workers and people who live in congregate care settings.

It has said the rollout will look different in each of its 34 public health units. Some public health units are ahead of the province’s schedule for vaccinations.

A pilot project at more than 300 pharmacies in Toronto, Kingston and Windsor Oxford-AstraZeneca started offering shots to those aged 60 to 64 in March.

That program is being expanded to offer shots to people aged 60 and older starting on March 22. Some primary care physicians are also offering Oxford-AstraZeneca shots to eligible patients in that age range.

The pharmacy pilot will expand to 700 locations across the province in the coming weeks, then to approximately 1,500 sites as supply becomes available.

Other currently eligible people include front line health-care workers, Indigenous adults and chronic home health-care recipients, and some health units have started vaccinating people experiencing homelessness.

The interval between vaccine doses has been extended to four months in Ontario.

Manitoba

Manitoba is starting to vaccinate people aged 65 and older and First Nation people aged 45 and older. Health officials plan to reduce the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

Eligibility was recently expanded to include nearly all health-care workers, including those who do not provide direct patient care. All people who work in congregate living facilities are also able to get vaccinated.

Dr. Joss Reimer, medical lead of the province’s vaccine task force, has said inoculations could be open to all adults in the province by August if supplies are steady. There are supersites in cities where people can get vaccines and pop-up clinics have begun in rural and northern Manitoba communities for people who are eligible.

Health officials say the province has capacity to deliver 20,000 doses each day, but are currently hindered by limited supply.

Manitoba has already indicated it would opt for a four-month interval between doses.

The military is also being deployed to northern Manitoba to help vaccination efforts in 23 remote First Nations. Up to 200 members will help set up sites, transport people and administer doses. The goal is to vaccinate 100,000 First Nations people in 100 days.

To date, 146,529 doses of vaccine have been administered including 99,091 first doses and 47,438 second doses.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority is booking vaccinations for residents aged 62 and older. The minimum age drops to 50 for people living in the Far North.

Those deemed to be medically vulnerable and have underlying health conditions can also get a shot, but have to wait to receive a letter first. Priority health-care workers are also on the list.

The province plans to open more drive-thru vaccination clinics once its receives the next shipment of Oxford-AstraZeneca shots. To date, the province has done around 144,000 vaccinations.

Alberta 

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans aged 18 and over a first dose of vaccine by the end of June.

On March 15, residents aged 65 to 74, and First Nations, Inuit and Metis aged 50-plus, were allowed to begin booking. The province had originally not expected to begin this stage of vaccination until April.

In April, the Alberta government aims to start offering the vaccine to people with some chronic health conditions born between 1957 and 2005. That includes people with certain lung, kidney, liver and heart diseases, people treated for cancer in the past year, those with severe mental illness and substance use disorders, and pregnant women.

After that, vaccines will be available to more health-care workers and people with jobs in certain congregate living settings, such as jails and homeless shelters. Meat plant workers will also qualify in this phase.

Alberta has also said it will follow other provinces by extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months.

British Columbia

The B.C. government is accelerating the timeline for the COVID-19 vaccine once again, allowing people who are “extremely clinically vulnerable” and some seniors to book their shots earlier than expected.

The Ministry of Health says that people at higher risk from COVID-19 due to existing medical conditions, including transplant recipients and those with cancer and severe respiratory conditions, will be able to register for their vaccine beginning Monday.

This group of people was originally scheduled to receive their shots in Phase 3 starting in April, but Health Minister Adrian Dix said the province has made tremendous progress on its age-based program and has additional vaccine supply.

The government said the new timeline means that about 200,000 people in B.C. aged 16 years or older who are clinically extremely vulnerable will receive their first dose of vaccine in the coming weeks.

The province has also announced a partnership with 14 businesses in the tourism and hospitality sectors that have been hit hard by the pandemic to use more than 1,400 laid-off workers to provide non-clinical help with the COVID-19 immunization rollout.

Nunavut

Nunavut’s priority populations are being vaccinated first. They include residents of shelters, people aged 60 years and up, staff and inmates at correctional facilities, first responders and front-line health-care staff.

After a COVID-19 vaccine is administered, patients will be tracked to ensure they are properly notified to receive their second dose.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories says it expects to finish its vaccine rollout by the end of April. It also expects to receive enough doses of the Moderna vaccine by the end of March to inoculate 75 per cent of the adult population.

Yukon

Yukon says it will receive enough vaccine to immunize 75 per cent of its adult population by the end of March.

Priority for vaccinations has been given to residents and staff in long-term care homes, group homes and shelters, as well as health-care workers and personal support workers. People over the age of 80 who are not living in long-term care, and those living in rural and remote communities, including Indigenous Peoples, are also on the priority list for shots.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Thursday, March 25, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Thursday, March 25, 2021.

There are 946,370 confirmed cases in Canada.

<b>_ Canada: 946,370 confirmed cases (37,100 active, 886,511 resolved, 22,759 deaths).<sup>*</sup>The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.</b>

There were 4,051 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 97.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 27,121 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,874.

There were 24 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 203 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 29. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.88 per 100,000 people.

There have been 26,858,481 tests completed.

<b>_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,015 confirmed cases (seven active, 1,002 resolved, six deaths).</b>

There was one new case Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 1.34 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been two new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 216,291 tests completed.

<b>_ Prince Edward Island: 152 confirmed cases (eight active, 144 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 5.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 120,957 tests completed.

<b>_ Nova Scotia: 1,696 confirmed cases (24 active, 1,606 resolved, 66 deaths).</b>

There were five new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 2.45 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 22 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 405,288 tests completed.

<b>_ New Brunswick: 1,517 confirmed cases (64 active, 1,423 resolved, 30 deaths).</b>

There were 12 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 8.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 40 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is six.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 255,565 tests completed.

<b>_ Quebec: 304,490 confirmed cases (6,918 active, 286,946 resolved, 10,626 deaths).</b>

There were 783 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 80.68 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,040 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 720.

There were eight new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 57 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is eight. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 123.92 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,896,641 tests completed.

<b>_ Ontario: 333,690 confirmed cases (15,047 active, 311,380 resolved, 7,263 deaths).</b>

There were 1,571 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 102.12 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,734 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,676.

There were 10 new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 76 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.29 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,999,939 tests completed.

<b>_ Manitoba: 33,591 confirmed cases (1,261 active, 31,401 resolved, 929 deaths).</b>

There were 81 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 91.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 597 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 85.

There were zero new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 67.35 per 100,000 people.

There have been 574,512 tests completed.

<b>_ Saskatchewan: 32,181 confirmed cases (1,565 active, 30,196 resolved, 420 deaths).</b>

There were 190 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 132.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,211 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 173.

There was one new reported death Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 35.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 635,569 tests completed.

<b>_ Alberta: 143,547 confirmed cases (6,534 active, 135,040 resolved, 1,973 deaths).</b>

There were 692 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 147.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,925 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 561.

There were two new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.05 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.62 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,602,756 tests completed.

<b>_ British Columbia: 93,969 confirmed cases (5,671 active, 86,857 resolved, 1,441 deaths).</b>

There were 716 new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 110.17 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,542 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 649.

There were three new reported deaths Wednesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 30 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.99 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,117,078 tests completed.

<b>_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one death).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,443 tests completed.

<b>_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,664 tests completed.

<b>_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Wednesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,702 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 25, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How the condo amenity wars are changing Canadian cities

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Mar 25th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, a long time ago, an amenity in a condo was limited to things like a pool, a gym or maybe a patio. Now, as units grow smaller and developers court buyers, they’ve become more and more luxurious. You want a rock-climbing wall? Access to communal BMWs? A rooftop running track that lights up at night? A full library and study area? No problem.

But what happens when many of the services that used to belong to the neighbourhood become accessible to condo owners only? If nobody uses the neighbourhood pool, or library, or running track—because they already have a private one in their building—how long do cities fund those things? What does a downtown look like where every development is built to be self-contained, and nothing is made for everyone to access?

GUEST: Aaron Hutchins, Maclean’s

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, March 24, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 24th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

There are 942,320 confirmed cases in Canada.

<b>_ Canada: 942,320 confirmed cases (36,310 active, 883,275 resolved, 22,735 deaths).<sup>*</sup>The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.</b>

There were 3,601 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 95.54 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 26,455 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,779.

There were 19 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 217 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 31. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.82 per 100,000 people.

There have been 26,778,301 tests completed.

<b>_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,014 confirmed cases (six active, 1,002 resolved, six deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 1.15 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 215,955 tests completed.

<b>_ Prince Edward Island: 152 confirmed cases (eight active, 144 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were two new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 5.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 120,529 tests completed.

<b>_ Nova Scotia: 1,691 confirmed cases (21 active, 1,604 resolved, 66 deaths).</b>

There was one new case Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.14 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 19 new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.01 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 403,532 tests completed.

<b>_ New Brunswick: 1,505 confirmed cases (57 active, 1,418 resolved, 30 deaths).</b>

There were seven new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 7.29 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 29 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 254,812 tests completed.

<b>_ Quebec: 303,707 confirmed cases (6,742 active, 286,347 resolved, 10,618 deaths).</b>

There were 656 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 78.63 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,960 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 709.

There were four new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 61 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 123.83 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,870,617 tests completed.

<b>_ Ontario: 332,119 confirmed cases (15,017 active, 309,849 resolved, 7,253 deaths).</b>

There were 1,546 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 101.92 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,671 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,667.

There were nine new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 80 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.23 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,967,383 tests completed.

<b>_ Manitoba: 33,511 confirmed cases (1,247 active, 31,335 resolved, 929 deaths).</b>

There were 93 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 90.41 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 611 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 87.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 67.35 per 100,000 people.

There have been 572,807 tests completed.

<b>_ Saskatchewan: 31,991 confirmed cases (1,472 active, 30,100 resolved, 419 deaths).</b>

There were 149 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 124.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,108 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 158.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 35.55 per 100,000 people.

There have been 632,360 tests completed.

<b>_ Alberta: 142,855 confirmed cases (6,231 active, 134,653 resolved, 1,971 deaths).</b>

There were 465 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 140.91 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,712 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 530.

There were three new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 19 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.57 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,595,428 tests completed.

<b>_ British Columbia: 93,253 confirmed cases (5,508 active, 86,307 resolved, 1,438 deaths).</b>

There were 682 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 107 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,324 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 618.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 31 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 27.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,111,072 tests completed.

<b>_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one death).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,437 tests completed.

<b>_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 15,596 tests completed.

<b>_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 1.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,697 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 24, 2021.

The Canadian Press

B.C. Premier John Horgan to announce partnerships in COVID immunization plan

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 24th, 2021

VICTORIA — British Columbia Premier John Horgan and Dr. Penny Ballem, the lead on the provincial COVID-19 immunization team, are to reveal more information today on the vaccine rollout.

A government release says they will be announcing new partnerships for the immunization plan.

Health officials announced yesterday that another 200,000 people who have serious medical conditions would be able to book a shot sooner than expected, starting on Monday.

Health Minister Adrian Dix says “tremendous progress” has been made in the age-based vaccine program, allowing the government to move those who are at increased health risk up in the queue.

People with various forms of cancer, transplant recipients, those with severe respiratory problems, kidney disease and other conditions will get a letter in the mail to take to their appointment.

The age-based schedule is also being accelerated with those age 76 and up able to book starting at noon today.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 24, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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