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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Aug. 17

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Aug 17th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. on Aug. 17, 2020:

There are 122,087 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 61,151 confirmed (including 5,720 deaths, 53,847 resolved)

_ Ontario: 40,646 confirmed (including 2,789 deaths, 36,953 resolved)

_ Alberta: 12,053 confirmed (including 221 deaths, 10,796 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 4,358 confirmed (including 196 deaths, 3,533 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,580 confirmed (including 22 deaths, 1,365 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,074 confirmed (including 64 deaths, 1,007 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 682 confirmed (including 9 deaths, 483 resolved), 15 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 268 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 186 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 169 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 41 confirmed (including 36 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 14 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 122,087 (15 presumptive, 122,072 confirmed including 9,026 deaths, 108,484 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 17, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Tracy Moore brings blunt anti-racism to daytime lifestyle TV

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, Aug 17th, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, Tracy Moore took over as host of Cityline 12 years ago, the first Black woman to host a Canadian daytime lifestyle show. The reaction to her debut was … ugly. But 12 years later, Tracy is still here, and has been talking fashion and health and recipes and everything else you’d expect for more than a decade.

But now, she’s also talking about anti-racism and white supremacy. On a lifestyle show. In a space that’s traditionally been considered out of bounds for anything political or uncomfortable. So how is that working out?

GUEST: Tracy Moore, host of Cityline

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Vigils to take place tonight for Alberta doctor killed in walk-in clinic

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Aug 14th, 2020

RED DEER, Alta. — Two vigils are planned tonight for a family doctor who was killed at a walk-in clinic in central Alberta earlier this week.

Dr. Walter Reynolds, a 45-year-old father of two girls, died in hospital after he was attacked Monday morning at the Village Mall clinic in Red Deer, Alta.

Deng Mabiour, who is 54, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Reynolds, as well as assault with a weapon and assaulting a police officer.

Police have said Mabiour and Reynolds knew each other through the clinic, but did not say whether Mabiour was a patient.

One witness told media that she heard cries for help and a man in the clinic had a hammer and a machete.

The Alberta Medical Association, which is organizing the vigils in Red Deer and Edmonton, is asking doctors who attend to wear white lab coats or white clothing to honour Reynolds.

The clinic where Reynolds worked has described him as a devoted husband, father and doctor who came to Canada from South Africa in 2003.

It says Reynolds and his wife, Anelia, first lived in Manitoba then moved to Red Deer in 2006.

“From the delivery room to the hospice, he dedicated himself 100 per cent,” the Village Mall clinic said in a statement earlier this week.

“If there was a task at work that needed to be done, he would step up to the plate. If a patient needed help, he walked the extra mile … and then some.”

Reynolds and his wife were often seen jogging around the neighbourhood. He was an avid runner, often participating in marathons and mud races, the clinic said.

“If there was a campsite to explore, then they were there. Always exploring, always an adventure, always on the move … so full of life.”

A GoFundMe page was set up to raise funds for the education of Reynolds’ children. It reached more than $230,000 by Thursday afternoon.

Dr. Edward Ohanjanians said in an interview that Reynolds was “the best colleague I ever had.”

Reynolds founded the Village Mall clinic and took care of all of its shopping and scheduling, he said.

Ohanjanians was there when Reynolds was attacked. He said he was unable to talk about what happened.

“I witnessed the tragic death of my colleague and friend,” he said. “It’s a difficult time.”

The vigils, both scheduled for 7 p.m., are to take place outside Red Deer City Hall and Edmonton City Hall.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Aug. 14, 2020

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Aug. 14

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Aug 14th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. on Aug. 14, 2020:

There are 121,234 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 60,917 confirmed (including 5,715 deaths, 53,441 resolved)

_ Ontario: 40,367 confirmed (including 2,787 deaths, 36,689 resolved)

_ Alberta: 11,969 confirmed (including 220 deaths, 10,713 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 4,274 confirmed (including 196 deaths, 3,500 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,511 confirmed (including 20 deaths, 1,325 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,071 confirmed (including 64 deaths, 1,007 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 588 confirmed (including 8 deaths, 377 resolved), 15 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 268 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 180 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 169 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 41 confirmed (including 36 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 121,234 (15 presumptive, 121,219 confirmed including 9,015 deaths, 107,551 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 14, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The Raptors are back, and ready to repeat. Here’s why this team is unique.

THE BIG STORY | posted Friday, Aug 14th, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, what the Toronto Raptors are attempting has never been done before— they’re trying to shed a superstar and get even better. When the reigning champs begin the NBA Playoffs Monday against Brooklyn, they’ll do so with a better winning percentage than they managed with Kawhi Leonard shutting down opponents and filling the bucket.

What makes this group so special? How do they go about winning games against teams that feature Hall of Famers at the top of their rosters? What will they have to do to thrive in a star-driven playoff series? What’s their biggest weakness? And can they really, actually win another NBA title?

GUEST: Michael Grange, Sportsnet

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

Complaints filed against Edmundston officers in fatal shooting of Chantel Moore

Kyle Mack | posted Thursday, Aug 13th, 2020

A man holds a picture of Chantel Moore during a healing gathering at the B.C. Legislature in Victoria on June 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

FREDERICTON — A law firm representing the estate of Chantel Moore has filed a pair of complaints with the New Brunswick Police Commission in connection with her death.

One complaint targets the Edmundston police officer directly involved in the shooting of 26-year-old Moore, an Indigenous woman killed during a wellness check June 4. The other is against a senior Edmundston police officer regarding comments made on live television in the hours following the shooting.

Lawyer T.J. Burke said Wednesday he filed the complaints under the provincial Police Act at the direction of his clients.

Moore was fatally shot after she allegedly lunged at an officer with a knife. Quebec’s independent police watchdog is investigating because New Brunswick does not have its own police oversight agency.

“We wanted to bring these up right away because we don’t trust (that) the New Brunswick Police Commission is going to file a complaint … and we don’t think the chief of police in Edmundston will do it,” Burke said in an interview. “As civilians, lawyers, we did it on behalf of the estate of Chantel Moore.”

The commission is an independent board of citizens that oversees complaints involving seven municipal police services and two regional police forces in the province. New Brunswick’s Police Act generally provides one year for complaints to be filed.

“New Brunswick police officers are subjected to civil proceedings where they can be disciplined by an oversight commission,” Burke said.

In the case of the police officer directly involved in the shooting, Burke said the complaint requests he be sanctioned and removed from his job. If criminal charges result from the watchdog’s probe into Moore’s killing, however, the case would delay any hearing into the complaint.

Moore’s family wants the complaint against a high-ranking Edmundston police officer pursued immediately, Burke said.

That officer offered a public apology for laughing when asked a question during a CTV News interview in the aftermath of Moore’s shooting. Burke said that considering no criminal charges will result from that incident, the complaint should be pursued by the commission right now.

“We believe the laughter was injurious to not only to the family, to New Brunswickers, but to Canadians all alike and believe that it falls well below the standards a high-ranking officer should hold in office,” Burke said, adding the family didn’t accept the apology.

Edmundston Police Chief Alain Lang said in an email Wednesday, “The entire matter is presently under investigation and we have no further comments to make.”

Moore’s killing was the first of two deaths involving Indigenous people in the span of about one week in the province. Rodney Levi, 48, was killed by the RCMP near the Metepenagiag Mi’kmaq Nation, on June 12.

The Mounties have said a suspect carrying knives was jolted with a stun gun, but that failed to subdue him. He was shot when he charged at officers, police said. Levi’s death is also under investigation by the Quebec watchdog.

New Brunswick has announced a coroner will hold separate inquests into both deaths.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Aug. 12, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Aug. 13

Kyle Mack | posted Thursday, Aug 13th, 2020

A man wears a face mask as he sits in a park in Montreal, Sunday, August 9, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. on Aug. 13, 2020:

There are 120,844 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 60,813 confirmed (including 5,709 deaths, 53,270 resolved)

_ Ontario: 40,289 confirmed (including 2,787 deaths, 36,590 resolved)

_ Alberta: 11,893 confirmed (including 217 deaths, 10,632 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 4,196 confirmed (including 196 deaths, 3,469 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,484 confirmed (including 20 deaths, 1,314 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,071 confirmed (including 64 deaths, 1,007 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 563 confirmed (including 8 deaths, 368 resolved), 15 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 268 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 178 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 168 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 41 confirmed (including 36 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 120,844 (15 presumptive, 120,829 confirmed including 9,006 deaths, 107,148 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 13, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Quebec farms facing lost profits and rotting harvests due to migrant worker shortage

Kyle Mack | posted Thursday, Aug 13th, 2020

Farm owners Francois Daoust and Melina Plante, left, are seen in their greenhouse with summer employee Florence Lachapelle in Havelock, Que., on Thursday, April 23, 2020. Nineteen-year-old Florence Lachapelle was among hundreds of Quebecers who tried their hand at planting seeds and harvesting produce this summer, replacing migrant workers who were unable to leave their countries because of the COVID-19 pandemic. And while Lachapelle spent long days working the fields on Francois D’Aoust’s farm in Havelock, Que., too few other Quebecers took up the call to help the province’s struggling agricultural industry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

MONTREAL — Nineteen-year-old Florence Lachapelle was among hundreds of Quebecers who tried their hand at planting seeds and harvesting produce this summer, replacing migrant workers who were unable to leave their countries because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

And while Lachapelle spent long days working the fields on Francois D’Aoust’s farm in Havelock, Que., too few other Quebecers took up the call to help the province’s struggling agricultural industry.

Despite a recruiting drive by the provincial government in April, the lack of labour this season has forced farmers to cut production or leave food rotting in the fields.

Unfortunately for Lachapelle, she fell ill with mononucleosis after two months and returned home to Montreal. She said the work was very demanding with so few migrant workers available.

“They’re professionals and we’re simply not,” Lachapelle said in a recent interview.

D’Aoust said he hired a handful of people to work alongside Lachapelle, who were out of work in other sectors such as communications, film and the restaurant industry. But once their opportunities returned, he said, they left for their better-paying jobs.

“Not a lot of people are used to (physical) work all day,” D’Aoust said in a recent interview. “It’s just not the kind of work that we do. It’s rare that people are in shape and can (work) all day in the field.

“People that are farmers, themselves, in their country, surely they are at an advantage.”

D’Aoust and his wife, Melina Plante, have hired the same four Guatemalan seasonal workers year after year. But this year the farmhands were stuck at home at the beginning of Quebec’s farming season due to travel restrictions their country imposed to limit the spread of COVID-19.

He said it takes inexperienced Quebecers up to three times as long to do farm work compared to a migrant worker. That meant he had to pay locals to do less work, eating into his profits.

D’Aoust slashed production at his farm, Les Bontes de la Vallee, by 60 per cent this year because he and his wife figured they would only have migrant workers later in the harvest season.

Two Guatemalan workers eventually made it on D’Aoust and Plante’s farm — but the financial damage to the business was done. “What we hope is to pass through this difficult period without too much loss and start again next year,” he said. “We just want to stay alive.”

For Michel Ricard, who owns 60 hectares of farmland in Saint-Alexis-de-Montcalm, about 60 kilometres north of Montreal, he said he’s going to lose a lot money and food this year because migrant workers from Mexico and Guatemala haven’t been able to arrive.

By the end of August, Ricard said he expects to lose approximately $100,000 dollars worth of cucumbers because he has no one to pick them.

Experienced foreign workers are “essential for the future, for me, and for the majority of growers of vegetables,” he said in a recent interview.

“The people from Guatemala are able to work from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. It’s not a problem. Sometimes I need to stop them because they want to continue, but sometimes I say ‘that’s enough for today.’”

Local workers haven’t been much help to him, he said. Ricard had his daughter post a message on Facebook to reach out to prospective farmhands, but he said only eight came through for him.

“It was impossible,” Ricard said.

The Union des producteurs agricoles, which represents about 42,000 Quebec farmers, says there are close to 2,000 fewer migrant workers on Quebec farms than usual. Despite the UPA’s efforts to lure Quebec workers through a recruiting drive, just under 1,400 were assigned to Quebec farms this year.

“It didn’t replace, really, the foreign workers,” UPA President Marcel Groleau said in a recent interview. “It helped on some issues … but those workers are not trained and can’t really replace the foreign workers that are trained and have experience on farms.”

Farmers such as D’Aoust and Ricard say migrant farmhands are willing to work longer hours, even for minimal pay.

Groleau said the federal government’s emergency response benefit, which offers up to $2,000 a month to many people who have lost jobs, has encouraged Quebecers to stay away from the gruelling field work.

“When you can get two thousand dollars a month sitting at home,” Groleau said, “it’s not really interesting to go on a farm and work a little bit for minimum wage.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 13, 2020.

Julian McKenzie, The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Aug. 12

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Aug 12th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. on Aug. 12, 2020:

There are 120,421 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 60,718 confirmed (including 5,697 deaths, 53,135 resolved)

_ Ontario: 40,194 confirmed (including 2,786 deaths, 36,456 resolved)

_ Alberta: 11,772 confirmed (including 216 deaths, 10,552 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 4,111 confirmed (including 195 deaths, 3,444 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,479 confirmed (including 20 deaths, 1,294 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,071 confirmed (including 64 deaths, 1,007 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 547 confirmed (including 8 deaths, 360 resolved), 15 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 268 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 263 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 177 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 168 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 36 confirmed (including 36 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 120,421 (15 presumptive, 120,406 confirmed including 8,991 deaths, 106,746 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 12, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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