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Tam urges Thanksgiving caution amid recent rise in cases of COVID-19

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Oct 5th, 2020

MONTREAL — Canada’s top public health officer is urging people to plan ahead to make sure this year’s Thanksgiving holiday is safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Theresa Tam says indoor gatherings should be kept small, especially in parts of the country where infection rates are high.

She says people celebrating outdoors should follow physical distancing guidelines and encouraged people to avoid sharing food and other objects during their meals.

Tam is also suggesting that Canadians opt for virtual Thanksgiving dinners instead of in-person gatherings.

Tam’s suggestions come as new COVID-19 case numbers surge in several parts of the country, most notably Quebec and Ontario.

Quebec reported more than 1,000 new diagnoses for the third straight day on Sunday, while Ontario has recorded more than 500 cases every day for the past week.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 4, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Oct. 5

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Oct 5th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. EDT on Oct. 5, 2020:

There are 166,160 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 78,459 confirmed (including 5,878 deaths, 65,304 resolved)

_ Ontario: 54,199 confirmed (including 2,975 deaths, 45,819 resolved)

_ Alberta: 18,357 confirmed (including 272 deaths, 16,527 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 9,381 confirmed (including 238 deaths, 7,813 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 2,140 confirmed (including 23 deaths, 1,421 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,959 confirmed (including 24 deaths, 1,782 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,089 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,021 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 276 confirmed (including 4 deaths, 269 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 201 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 193 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 59 confirmed (including 57 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 7 presumptive

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Total: 166,160 (7 presumptive, 166,153 confirmed including 9,481 deaths, 140,239 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 5, 2020.

The Canadian Press

How do you vaccinate an entire planet?

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, Oct 5th, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, if all goes well, sometime in the next six months, one of the many Covid-19 vaccine candidates will receive approval for human use. It will be a day to celebrate. The end of the pandemic will at long last be in sight.

But what happens next? Who gets the first doses? The second batch? How do you actually vaccinate billions and billions of people, quickly and safely? A vaccine isn’t the end of the road, as today’s guest will tell us, it’s more like an off-ramp.

GUEST: Danielle Groen

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Anna Olson’s Thanksgiving Recipes!

Kyle Mack | posted Monday, Oct 5th, 2020

Baked Chicken (Turkey) Katsu with Cucumber Salad & Ginger Cabbage

“Katsu” is Japanese for “cutlet” and these crispy, panko-crusted chicken cutlets make for a delightfully comforting meal.  The comfort comes from the contrast of the crunch of the cutlet’s crust against the sweet-salty taste of the katsu sauce and the ice-cold refreshing nature of the cabbage, but also in the virtue of this dish.  If ordered in a restaurant, your chicken katsu would be deep-fried, but here the cutlets are oven-baked, minimizing the fat used.

Yield: 4 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 18 minutes

 

Ingredients:

Cucumber Salad & Cabbage:

1 English cucumber, thinly sliced on a mandolin

2 Tbsp (30 mL) rice wine vinegar

1 tsp (5 mL) sesame oil

½ tsp (2 mL) table salt

4 cups (1 L) finely sliced green cabbage (sliced on a mandolin)

1 Tbsp (15 mL) finely grated fresh ginger

2 lemons

 

Katsu Sauce:

1/3 cup (80 mL) ketchup

2 Tbsp (30 mL) soy sauce

8–10 dashes Worcestershire sauce

 

Chicken Katsu:

2 cups (500 mL) panko breadcrumbs

2 Tbsp (30 mL) butter

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts (about 1 lb/450 g)

2/3 cup (100 g) all-purpose flour

2 large eggs + 2 Tbsp (30 mL) water

Salt and pepper

6 cups (1.5 L) cooked Japanese sticky rice

3 Tbsp (45 mL) toasted sesame seeds

 

  1. For the cucumber salad, toss the cucumber with the rice vinegar, sesame oil and salt, and chill until ready to eat. Chill the thinly sliced cabbage in ice-water to crisp for 20 minutes, then drain and pat dry with kitchen towels just before serving, then toss with the ginger and juice of 1 lemon. Cut the lemon into 6 wedges and chill.

 

  1. For the sauce, whisk together the ketchup, soy sauce and Worcestershire sauce, and pour into 6 little serving dishes.

 

  1. Toast the panko in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until lightly browned, about 8 minutes, then stir in the butter until melted. Set aside to cool.

 

  1. Preheat the oven to 400F (200C). Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper and place a wire rack over top.

 

  1. Slice the chicken breasts into ¾-inch (18 mm) slices against the grain. Place 1 to 2 slices in a cut-open resealable plastic bag and pound with a meat mallet (or the bottom of a pot) until it is just under ½-inch (12 mm) thick and chill until ready to cook.

 

  1. Set up 3 flat bowls —the first for the flour, the second for the egg wash, and the third for the toasted panko breadcrumbs. Add a little salt and pepper to each bowl and stir in. Dip each of the chicken cutlets into the flour, shake off the excess, then into the egg and, finally, into the panko, coating it thoroughly. Set the breaded cutlets on the wire rack set over the baking sheet and bake until golden brown and crispy, about 18 minutes. Check that the chicken is cooked through by cutting into a cutlet. If the juices run clear, it’s done.

 

  1. To serve, slice each cutlet into 5 strips and serve with cooked Japanese rice, the Tonkatsu sauce, cucumber salad, and a mound of the drained cabbage. Sprinkle the toasted sesame seeds over the cutlets, cucumber salad and cabbage and serve with a wedge of lemon.

 

 

MAE’S BROCCOLI CHEDDAR SALAD

 

Serves 6

Prep Time: Under 15 minutes

Cook Time:

 

1/4 cup (40 g)           raisins

1/4 cup (40 g)           dried cranberries

3 cups (750 mL)       broccoli florets, cut into very small pieces

4 strips                       cooked bacon, chopped

1                                  green onion, sliced

1/3 cup (80 mL)        mayonnaise

3 tbsp (45 mL)          sour cream

1 tbsp (15 mL)          lemon juice

1 cup (110 g)            coarsely grated medium Cheddar cheese

salt and pepper

 

  1. Soak raisins and dried cranberries in hot tap water for a minute or two, to soften. Drain and reserve.

 

  1. Toss broccoli**, bacon and green onion together. In a separate bowl, stir mayonnaise, sour cream and lemon juice and stir into broccoli mixture. Add cheddar cheese, raisins and dried cranberries and season to taste.

 

Chill until ready to serve.

 

 

**To make the broccoli easier to digest and brighten its colour, it can be blanched in boiling, salted water for 30 seconds and then shocked in an ice bath before draining well.

With Trump testing positive, a look at some Canadian politicians and COVID-19

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Oct 2nd, 2020

United States President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19. Here is a look as some Canadian politicians who have tested positive or needed to isolate themselves and get tested for COVID-19:

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole _ O’Toole and his wife tested positive for the virus last month, not long after O’Toole won the leadership of the party. It’s believed he contracted the virus from a staffer who was in his immediate circle. He emerged from quarantine this week to deliver his official reply to the Liberals’ throne speech. “We all have to be very cautious,” he said upon his return.

Yves-Francois Blanchet _ The Bloc Quebecois leader and his wife also tested positive for the virus last month. He returned to Parliament the same day as O’Toole saying he was lucky to have caught a mild case of the illness. “Some people go through it much more painfully than I did,” he said. “I was very, very, very lucky. Some people die of that thing.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau _ Trudeau’s wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau tested positive for COVID-19 on March 12 after a trip to the United Kingdom. The prime minister subsequently went into a 14-day isolation at home with his three kids, just as the pandemic lockdown was beginning in Canada. Trudeau remained in isolation for almost a month, not returning to Parliament Hill until April 8. He never developed symptoms and never got tested for COVID-19, but says he will take an antibody test when they are widely available.

Bill Morneau _ The former federal finance minister was one of at least eight MPs who were tested for COVID-19 and self-isolated after meeting with United Nations World Food Program executive director David Beasley in Ottawa on March 11 and March 12. Beasley met privately with Morneau, attended a reception and appeared at a House of Commons committee. He tested positive for COVID-19 about a week later. Liberal Anita Vandenbeld, NDP Heather McPherson, and Conservatives David Sweet, Mike Lake and Randy Hoback are among those who isolated after coming into contact with Beasley. None tested positive.

Kamal Khera _ The Brampton-West Liberal MP was the first Canadian politician to test positive for COVID-19 on March 25. Khera developed flu-like symptoms and was tested the next day. She was one of the MPs who met with Beasley, though her office said it was not clear where she contracted the virus.

Seamus O’Regan _ The federal minister of natural resources was tested and self-isolated in early March after developing a bad cold. He had earlier gone to a mining conference in Toronto attended by more than 23,000 people from around the world. At least three people at the conference tested positive for COVID-19, but O’Regan was not among them.

Francois-Philippe Champagne _ The foreign affairs minister was tested for COVID-19 in March after falling ill following a trip overseas. He tested negative.

Mary Ng _ The international trade minister went into isolation March 11 on the advice of her doctor after a persistent cough, and her asthma, were causing her problems. She tested negative.

Jagmeet Singh _ The NDP Leader isolated himself in March out of an abundance of caution when he experienced mild cold symptoms.

Anthony Housefather _ The Montreal Liberal MP put himself into isolation in mid-March after returning from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee conference in Washington, D.C. the first three days of March. A Toronto resident who also attended the conference tested positive after returning home.

Sylvie Parent _ The mayor of Longueuil, Que., on Montreal’s south shore, tested positive for COVID-19 this week. Her positive test has led to the isolation and testing of at least seven other Quebec politicians, including three provincial cabinet ministers and Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Oct. 2

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Oct 2nd, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. EDT on Oct. 2, 2020:

There are 160,542 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 75,221 confirmed (including 5,850 deaths, 63,144 resolved)

_ Ontario: 52,248 confirmed (including 2,851 deaths, 44,422 resolved)

_ Alberta: 18,235 confirmed (including 269 deaths, 16,370 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 9,220 confirmed (including 235 deaths, 7,695 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 2,029 confirmed (including 20 deaths, 1,388 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,927 confirmed (including 24 deaths, 1,759 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,088 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,021 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 275 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 269 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 200 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 192 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 59 confirmed (including 57 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 7 presumptive

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Total: 160,542 (7 presumptive, 160,535 confirmed including 9,319 deaths, 136,350 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 2, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Have you been sold a lie about recycling?

THE BIG STORY | posted Friday, Oct 2nd, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, you’re a good citizen, so you probably toss your plastic into the recycling bin. Especially if it has those little recycling arrows on it. Why wouldn’t you? Public service campaigns have been telling you to do this forever? But what if those campaigns were a lie, designed to make you feel better about the plastic you use? What is plastic recycling was never going to be effective, except at selling more plastic?

GUEST: Laura Sullivan, NPR News investigative correspondent

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify.

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Health Canada approves rapid test for COVID-19

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Oct 1st, 2020

Health Canada has given the green light to a rapid test for COVID-19.

The department posted news of the approval of the Abbott Diagnostics ID Now test this afternoon, a day after the government said it had a deal to buy nearly eight million of the tests from the company.

The deal was conditional on Health Canada’s approving the tests, which it has done today.

The test has been in use in the United States for several months already.

Abbott’s website says the test can produce results in less than 13 minutes in the same place a nasal swab is taken from a patient.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford, who has been calling for quicker approval from the federal government on rapid testing, called the announcement a “great first step” when it comes to expanded testing options in Canada.

“What we need now is more information about when we can expect the federal government to deliver these units where they’re needed most, including remote and indigenous communities, long-term care homes and other congregate care settings at highest risk of experiencing outbreaks,” Ford said in a statement.

“We don’t have a moment to spare as cases continue to rise.”

Ford also called on the federal government to approval additional rapid test kits such as the BinaxNOW antigen test from Abbott, which has already been approved for use in the United States. That test is described as a highly portable credit card sized test kit that provides results in 15 minutes.

In Question Period, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the approved tests would be distributed to provinces and territories “in the coming weeks.”

Health Canada has emergency authority to quickly approve tests for COVID-19 and has been under increasing pressure to allow the use of rapid testing in Canada as cases surge and Canadians are sometimes waiting days to get their test results.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Oct. 1

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Oct 1st, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. EDT on Oct. 1, 2020:

There are 158,765 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 74,288 confirmed (including 5,834 deaths, 62,564 resolved)

_ Ontario: 51,710 confirmed (including 2,848 deaths, 43,907 resolved)

_ Alberta: 18,062 confirmed (including 267 deaths, 16,213 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 9,138 confirmed (including 234 deaths, 7,591 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 1,993 confirmed (including 20 deaths, 1,327 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,913 confirmed (including 24 deaths, 1,750 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,088 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,021 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 274 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 269 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 200 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 192 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 59 confirmed (including 57 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 7 presumptive

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Total: 158,765 (7 presumptive, 158,758 confirmed including 9,297 deaths, 134,924 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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