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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada | posted Friday, Oct 16th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. EDT on Oct. 16, 2020:

There are 191,730 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 89,963 confirmed (including 6,005 deaths, 75,467 resolved)

_ Ontario: 62,196 confirmed (including 3,022 deaths, 53,291 resolved)

_ Alberta: 21,443 confirmed (including 288 deaths, 18,417 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 11,034 confirmed (including 250 deaths, 9,257 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 3,098 confirmed (including 38 deaths, 1,533 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 2,232 confirmed (including 25 deaths, 1,936 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,092 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,024 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 292 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 200 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 284 confirmed (including 4 deaths, 271 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 63 confirmed (including 60 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut:  No confirmed cases

_ Total: 191,730 (0 presumptive, 191,730 confirmed including 9,699 deaths, 161,489 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 16, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Percy Schmeiser, Saskatchewan farmer known for fight against Monsanto, dies at 89

DANIELA GERMANO, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Oct 15th, 2020

Percy Schmeiser, a Saskatchewan farmer who became famous during his legal battle with biotech giant Monsanto, has died.

John Schmeiser said his father died quietly Tuesday afternoon at the age of 89.

He had Parkinson’s disease, his son said Wednesday.

Percy Schmeiser, who was from Bruno, Sask., came into the spotlight in the late 1990s after he was sued and taken to court by Monsanto for using its genetically modified canola seeds without a licence.

He denied intentionally using the company’s herbicide-resistant Roundup Ready seeds, saying they could have blown over from a neighbour’s farm or passing trucks.

The case went to the Supreme Court of Canada, which ruled that he infringed on Monsanto’s patent but did not have to pay damages to the company.

His death comes days after a movie about his life, simply called “Percy,” was released.

Oscar winning actor Christopher Walken stars as Schmeiser in the film that hit select theatres Friday in Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Regina and Saskatoon. It is to be released in other cities throughout the fall.

In a statement Wednesday, producer Daniel Bekerman said the filmmaking team developed a profound respect and admiration for Schmeiser.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of his passing. The Schmeiser family are wonderful people and we send our love to them,” Bekerman said.

“We are honoured to play a part in telling the story of a man who stood by his principles in the face of tremendous adversity.”

Schmeiser’s story has also been controversial. Some in the agriculture industry have criticized the “Percy” trailer on social media, saying it contains inaccuracies, including its depiction of Schmeiser as innocent.

In an interview earlier this month, “Percy” director Clark Johnson said such arguments are fair, but the movie is meant to “to get a debate and a conversation going.”

“If you want to take the position that he knew all along and he did it on purpose, take that position, that’s fine,” Johnson told The Canadian Press.

But he said he doesn’t think Schmeiser would risk everything he owned “to make up this lie.”

Schmeiser’s son said a private service will be held for the family, He declined to comment further.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 14, 2020.

Daniela Germano, The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Oct 15th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. EDT on Oct. 15, 2020:

There are 189,227 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 88,994 confirmed (including 5,977 deaths, 74,483 resolved)

_ Ontario: 61,413 confirmed (including 3,017 deaths, 52,512 resolved)

_ Alberta: 21,199 confirmed (including 287 deaths, 18,223 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 10,734 confirmed (including 250 deaths, 8,974 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 2,925 confirmed (including 37 deaths, 1,514 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 2,199 confirmed (including 25 deaths, 1,920 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,092 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,023 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 292 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 200 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 283 confirmed (including 4 deaths, 271 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 63 confirmed (including 60 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut:  No confirmed cases

_ Total: 189,227 (0 presumptive, 189,227 confirmed including 9,664 deaths, 159,213 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 15, 2020.

The Canadian Press

How to prepare for a winter in lockdown

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Oct 15th, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, unless you’re lucky enough to live in some of the areas of Canada that are largely free of Covid-19, you’re likely staring down a long few months spent isolated from most of the community and spent largely inside your house. The case numbers are rising. We’re told it’s not safe to socialize indoors and we’re just weeks away from the first deep freeze and snowstorm.

It can feel like a lot—if you let it. That’s not us pep-talking you. It’s science. There are people who live so far north that winter dominates their lives; who live with darkness during the day for weeks at a time. And if you survey those people about winter, well, you’d find they’re better at dealing with it than you are. So, what’s their secret?

GUEST: David Robson, science journalist and author of The Intelligence Trap

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Loneliness taking toll on Canadian mental health in COVID era, study finds

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Oct 14th, 2020

A new report on the mental health of Canadian workers suggests loneliness is worse for many people than the fear of dying from COVID-19.

Morneau Shepell’s overall mental health index for September was down 10.2 points from its pre-2020 benchmark. The reading in August was down 11.2 points from the benchmark, while July was down 10.4 points.

While the financial impact of the pandemic and getting ill with COVID-19 were the most prevalent concerns, people who identified loneliness as a concern had the lowest mental health score at minus 25.8.

That was even lower than the score of minus 17.7 for those who cited a fear of dying from COVID-19 as a worry.

Morneau Shepell’s latest monthly report on its mental health index is based on online responses collected Aug. 21 to 30, before the recent surge of COVID cases.

The polling industry’s professional body says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Oct 14th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. EDT on Oct. 14, 2020:

There are 186,882 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 87,791 confirmed (including 5,970 deaths, 73,734 resolved)

_ Ontario: 60,692 confirmed (including 3,017 deaths, 51,729 resolved)

_ Alberta: 20,956 confirmed (including 286 deaths, 18,055 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 10,734 confirmed (including 250 deaths, 8,974 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 2,779 confirmed (including 35 deaths, 1,496 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 2,174 confirmed (including 25 deaths, 1,911 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,092 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,023 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 284 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 200 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 283 confirmed (including 4 deaths, 271 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 63 confirmed (including 60 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved), 1 presumptive

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut:  No confirmed cases

_ Total: 186,882 (1 presumptive, 186,881 confirmed including 9,654 deaths, 157,486 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 14, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Inside the Atlantic Bubble, where life is close to normal

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, Oct 14th, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, we don’t have to look as far as New Zealand to find examples of how the battle against COVID-19 can be won. We have a success story right here in Canada, where the so-called Atlantic Bubble has held up very well over the past several months, and where life is mostly back to normal. There is even hockey, with fans in the stands and everything.

So how can the rest of Canada follow the Atlantic Bubble’s example? Is it even possible for larger provinces? How have they managed to stamp out COVID-19, and what kind of price have they paid for doing so?

GUEST: Greg Mercer, Atlantic Canada reporter, The Globe and Mail

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify.

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Actor Jon Cryer turns to B.C. ring-finder to search for lost wedding band

NICK WELLS, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Oct 13th, 2020

VANCOUVER — An actor is sharing his gratitude towards a Vancouver service specializing in finding lost rings after losing his own wedding band, kicking off a panicked search attempt.

Jon Cryer, known for his role in the television series Two and a Half Men, was walking along Vancouver’s seawall to meet up with castmates, on Friday when he lost his wedding ring.

“I pulled my hand out of my pocket and heard a ‘ping!’ To my left. I walked a couple more steps and realized my wedding ring was gone…,” he wrote on Twitter.

Cryer said he frantically searched for the missing wedding band but rain and a lack of working lamp posts hindered his efforts.

Losing the ring was especially hard, due to COVID-19 travel restrictions restricting him from seeing his wife regularly while filming in Vancouver, he wrote.

He returned Saturday to search through a muddy section of grass he believed the ring could be in, but didn’t have any luck.

Cryer turned to a company called the Ring Finders, that specialize in searching for rings and other lost valuables, to help him in his quest.

“In my mind, I’m thinking ‘there’s a 95 per cent chance it was probably dropped where someone could’ve seen it’,” said Chris Turner, who founded the company in 2009.

But the pair were lucky.

Turner says it took him three minutes to locate the ring using a metal detector.

The ring was found buried in a clump of grass near to where Cryer had searched on Saturday.

“This one surprised me. The odds of that ring making it to the grass, not only the grass, the deepest part of the grass … I was just astonished. I was like ‘the gods are on his side for sure’,” he said.

Cryer said he’s stunned at how quickly the ring was found.

“I’m still beside myself,” he wrote on Twitter.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 13, 2020.

Nick Wells, The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Oct 13th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. EDT on Oct. 13, 2020:

There are 182,707 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 86,976 confirmed (including 5,965 deaths, 72,857 resolved)

_ Ontario: 59,139 confirmed (including 3,005 deaths, 50,437 resolved)

_ Alberta: 19,995 confirmed (including 282 deaths, 17,488 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 10,185 confirmed (including 245 deaths, 8,502 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 2,578 confirmed (including 32 deaths, 1,483 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 2,092 confirmed (including 25 deaths, 1,888 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,092 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,023 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 283 confirmed (including 4 deaths, 270 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 272 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 199 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 61 confirmed (including 58 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved), 1 presumptive

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut:  No confirmed cases

_ Total: 182,707 (1 presumptive, 182,706 confirmed including 9,625 deaths, 154,238 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 13, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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