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Rogers to buy Shaw in deal valued at $26B

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Mar 15th, 2021

Rogers Communications Inc. has signed a deal to buy Shaw Communications Inc. in a deal valued at $26 billion, including debt.

Under the plan, Rogers will pay $40.50 in cash for all of Shaw’s issued and outstanding class A and class B shares.

Shaw’s class B shares closed at $23.90 on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Friday.

As part of the transaction, the companies said Rogers will invest $2.5 billion in 5G networks over the next five years across Western Canada.

Rogers also says it will create a new $1-billion fund dedicated to connecting rural, remote and Indigenous communities across Western Canada to high-speed internet service.

The deal, which is subject to other customary closing conditions, as well as approvals from Canadian regulators, is expected to close in the first half of 2022.

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Rogers is the parent company of this website and station.

Canada’s unemployment rate falls to lowest level since March 2020

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

Statistics Canada says the economy added 259,000 jobs in February, almost wiping out losses sustained over the previous two months.

The economy lost almost 213,000 jobs in January as lockdown measures erased months of gains, and marked the worst monthly declines since last April.

February’s reopenings reversed that drop with gains largely in Ontario and Quebec, and in sectors highly affected by tightened public health restrictions.

The national unemployment rate fell to 8.2 per cent, the lowest level since March 2020 at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and down from the 9.4 per cent recorded in February.

Statistics Canada says the unemployment rate would have been 10.7 per cent in February had it included in calculations Canadians who wanted to work but didn’t search for a job.

The figures blew past expectations of a gain of 75,000 and an unemployment rate of 9.2 per cent, according to financial data firm Refinitiv.

CIBC senior economist Royce Mendes writes that the quick turnaround in jobs numbers is reminiscent of the first wave of the pandemic when employment rebounded far faster than expected as the economy began reopening.

However, he says in a note that the labour market has a long way to get back to where it was prior to COVID-19.

The gains now leave the country 599,100 jobs short of where they were in February of last year, or 3.1 per cent below pre-pandemic levels.

The federal government is keeping a close eye on the labour market, suggesting it will use jobs as a gauge for planned stimulus measures to be unveiled in a spring budget.

So too is the Bank of Canada monitoring employment, noting the uneven impacts of job losses in its reasoning this week for holding its key policy rate at 0.25 per cent.

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Friday, March 12, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Friday, March 12, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 89,074 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,719,227 doses given. Nationwide, 587,721 people or 1.6 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 7,174.878 per 100,000.

There were 11,700 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 3,227,410 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 84.25 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland</b> is reporting 8,864 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 33,621 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 64.207 per 1,000. In the province, 1.75 per cent (9,170) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 48,470 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>P.E.I.</b> is reporting 1,945 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 15,226 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 95.985 per 1,000. In the province, 3.52 per cent (5,584) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 15,885 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 10 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.85 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Nova Scotia</b> is reporting 7,559 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 45,149 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 46.264 per 1,000. In the province, 1.58 per cent (15,383) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 73,680 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 61.28 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>New Brunswick</b> is reporting 4,742 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 38,483 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 49.335 per 1,000. In the province, 1.56 per cent (12,152) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 56,135 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 68.55 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Quebec</b> is reporting 19,227 new vaccinations administered for a total of 619,060 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 72.348 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 825,065 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 75.03 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Ontario</b> is reporting 40,610 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,019,407 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 69.399 per 1,000. In the province, 1.92 per cent (281,714) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 1,086,745 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.8 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Manitoba</b> is reporting 2,998 new vaccinations administered for a total of 97,783 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 71.011 per 1,000. In the province, 2.26 per cent (31,103) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 9,360 new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 159,220 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 12 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 61.41 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Saskatchewan</b> is reporting 1,493 new vaccinations administered for a total of 95,879 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 81.312 per 1,000. In the province, 2.38 per cent (28,107) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 93,145 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 102.9 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Alberta</b> is reporting 8,612 new vaccinations administered for a total of 317,574 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 72.142 per 1,000. In the province, 2.08 per cent (91,366) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 326,445 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 97.28 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>British Columbia</b> is reporting 11,451 new vaccinations administered for a total of 366,791 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 71.477 per 1,000. In the province, 1.70 per cent (87,009) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 2,340 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 445,920 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 8.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 82.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Yukon</b> is reporting 800 new vaccinations administered for a total of 26,374 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 632.00 per 1,000. In the territory, 22.17 per cent (9,253) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 35,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 84 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 75.35 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>The Northwest Territories</b> are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 28,208 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 625.191 per 1,000. In the territory, 24.71 per cent (11,151) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 35,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 78 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 79.91 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

<b>Nunavut</b> is reporting 253 new vaccinations administered for a total of 15,672 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 404.689 per 1,000. In the territory, 14.79 per cent (5,729) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 26,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 59.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 12, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Canada, U.S. mark 30th anniversary of acid rain treaty

BOB WEBER, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Mar 12th, 2021

Tens of thousands of lakes were dying, their lifeless waters clear to the depths. Public statues were eroding, their features eaten away by acid falling from the skies.

No more.

Thirty years after Canada and the United States signed a treaty on reducing acid rain, the deal has become a landmark — and a guidebook — on how nations can work together to solve environmental problems.

“It’s an example,” said John Smol, a biologist at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont. He did some of the early scientific research that connected the dots between emissions and empty watersheds.

“It showed you can get together and deal with a transboundary problem. You can set realistic targets. It really was a success story.”

The trouble was sulphur and nitrous dioxides from industrial smokestacks and cars combining with atmospheric moisture.

The treaty signed March 13, 1991, by Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. president George Bush changed all that.

A quarter of a century later, Canadian emissions of sulphur dioxide had decreased by 69 per cent. Nitrogen dioxide had fallen by more than 25 per cent. Emissions continue to fall.

It wasn’t easy, said Elizabeth May, a Green party MP and former party leader, who was then a senior policy adviser to Mulroney’s Progressive Conservative government.

“Just as we have false stories about climate change, we had false stories about acid rain,” she said. “At one point, (former U.S. president) Ronald Reagan said acid rain was caused by ducks.

“You had a strong lobby from the coal-producing states. You had a strong lobby in Canada. They weren’t feeling very co-operative. So where do you start?”

She gives a lot of credit to her old boss.

“Mulroney put acid rain at the top of every bilateral meeting,” she said.

“It was quite extraordinary how a plan came together. Often in politics, it’s quite random. Something goes wrong, someone’s in the right place at the right time.

“But this was a strategy that from its inception worked perfectly. You need leadership from the top and you need to demonstrate you’re serious.

“We haven’t seen political will like that in decades.”

Parallels with climate change are obvious, said Smol.

“It went through the same steps. It went from ‘there is no problem’ to ‘there is a problem, but it’s not our fault’ to ‘there is a problem, it is our fault, but it’s too late to do anything.’”

But a deal was achieved.


RELATED: ‘It starts at home:’ Former PM Brian Mulroney reflects on lessons from acid rain


“It is one of those rare environmental victories,” said Keith Stewart of Greenpeace. “We developed a treaty, implemented it and largely solved that particular problem.

“Industry stopped pumping money into lawyers and lobbyists and started hiring engineers, and they were able to solve the problem in relatively short order. The economy did not fall apart.”

Comparisons between acid rain and climate change can go too far, said Nelson Wiseman, a University of Toronto political scientist.

“The challenge is quite different,” he said. “Climate change is a global problem. Canada and the U.S. can agree to anything they want, climate change will continue.”

Wiseman also suggested politicians of different stripes were able to work together more easily back then.

“Things maybe are more polarized now than they were 30 years ago.”

The relationship between Mulroney and Bush was extraordinarily close. Mulroney gave the eulogy at Bush’s funeral.

“I don’t think you can say that about (Prime Minister Justin) Trudeau and (President Joe) Biden,” Wiseman said.

Still, said May, there’s a window for the two countries to make progress on this generation’s environmental challenge, just as they did on acid rain.

“We have a real opportunity with the Biden administration,” she said.

“Think about COVID. The kind of response we should be seeing for the climate crisis is now visible in how governments are responding to the COVID crisis.

“Is it possible that we could respond to the climate crisis with the same seriousness of purpose that we responded to acid rain? Absolutely.”

Just look at the results, said Mulroney.

“Interesting thing about acid rain,” he told The Canadian Press.

“You probably haven’t heard very much about it anymore. It doesn’t exist anymore because we got rid of it.”

Public safety minister grilled over quarantine hotel security after alleged assaults

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 11th, 2021

OTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Bill Blair is facing harsh questions over security under the federal quarantine program after reports of two incidents of alleged sexual assault.

At a parliamentary committee hearing Wednesday, Conservative MP Shannon Stubbs grilled Blair over safeguards for hotel guests and background checks for screening officers who work at the federally mandated hotels and do compliance checks at homes.

Blair told the committee that quarantine measures have been effective and that any allegations should be thoroughly investigated.

He diverted questions on the hotel quarantine program to the Public Health Agency of Canada that oversees it, saying he has no jurisdiction over it.

A government order that took effect Feb. 22 requires anyone entering Canada by airplane to stay in a federally approved hotel for the first three nights of a 14-day quarantine.

Police have arrested two men accused of sexual assault related to quarantine measures, including one at a Montreal hotel another involving a compliance check in Oakville, Ont.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 10, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How we can fix elder care in Canada

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Mar 11th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, if there’s one thing this pandemic has taught us, it’s how poorly we care for our elders in Canada. The stories of the carnage in long-term care facilities have been endless and bleak. The gaps in the system have been laid bare for all to see.

That’s the bad news. And it’s horrific. But the good news is that this is fixable. This is not an insurmountable challenge. The only question is we are ready and willing, finally, to pay for it? And where do we need to start?

GUEST: André Picard, Health Reporter, The Globe and Mail; Author, Neglected No More

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Mar 11th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks. Here’s a list of their plans to date:

Newfoundland and Labrador

The province says it is in Phase 1 of its vaccine rollout. Health-care workers on the front lines of the pandemic, staff at long-term care homes, people of “advanced age” and adults in remote or isolated Indigenous communities have priority.

Newfoundland and Labrador announced March 3 it was extending the interval between the first and second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to four months.

Public health officials said the change will help them vaccinate 40,000 more people with a single dose by the end of March. Liberal Leader and incumbent Premier Andrew Furey said the decision is a game changer for the province’s vaccination prospects.

Nova Scotia

Health officials in Nova Scotia announced March 2 that vaccination rollout plans for the month included the province’s first pharmacy clinics. Prototype pharmacy clinics will launch in Halifax and Shelburne on March 9, Port Hawkesbury on March 16 and Springhill on March 23.

Nova Scotia plans to have vaccine available to at least 75 per cent of the population by the end of September 2021.

Health officials said March 3 the upcoming shipment must be used by April 2 and therefore all 13,000 doses will be administered to residents across the province aged 50 to 64 years starting March 15.

The vaccine will be given out at 26 locations in Nova Scotia on a first come, first served basis.

Prince Edward Island

Health officials in Prince Edward Island say they will shift their focus to getting a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine to all adults by July 1, even if it means delaying the second shot for some.

Chief medical officer Heather Morrison has said people over the age of 80 will get a second dose based on their existing appointments. Going forward, she said, other residents will get a longer interval between their first and second doses, but she didn’t specific how long that will be.

New Brunswick 

The province is also focusing on vaccinating those living in long-term care homes, health-care workers with direct patient contact, adults in First Nations communities and older New Brunswickers in the first phase, which lasts until at least March.

The next phase is scheduled to begin in the spring and includes residents and staff of communal settings, other health-care workers including pharmacists, first responders and critical infrastructure employees.

The government website says once the vaccine supply is continuous and in large enough quantities, the entire population will be offered the shots.

Quebec 

Quebec started vaccinating older seniors March 1, after a first phase that focused largely on health-care workers, remote communities and long-term care. In Montreal, mass vaccine sites including the Olympic Stadium opened their doors to the public as the province began inoculating seniors who live in the hard-hit city.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments opened Wednesday for residents aged 70 and older across Quebec.

Vaccines had previously only been accessible to people as young as 70 in Montreal and its northern suburb of Laval. Health Minister Christian Dube said Tuesday the arrival of more vaccine shipments could allow the government to open vaccination to people aged 65 and older in the Montreal area as soon as Thursday.

On Wednesday, Montreal health officials announced several thousand new appointment slots for residents 70 and older living on the island of Montreal.

Premier Francois Legault told reporters this week his hope is that once those over 65 are vaccinated, more health orders could be relaxed, including the ban on indoor private gatherings. Legault says seniors aged 65 and older have accounted for 80 per cent of hospitalizations and 95 per cent of deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Quebec.

Ontario

Ontario has focused its initial vaccine effort on those in long-term care, high-risk retirement home residents, some health-care workers and people who live in congregate care settings.

The provincial government has said it aims to begin vaccinating Ontarians aged 80 and older starting the week of March 15, the same day it plans to launch its vaccine booking system, which will include a service desk and online portal.

It has said the rollout will look different in each of its 34 public health units.
Several regions in Ontario have moved ahead with their plans to vaccinate the general public using their own booking systems to allow residents aged 80 and older to schedule appointments.

The province has also said it will extend the interval between doses of COVID-19 vaccines to up to four months.

Toronto began vaccinating police force members who respond to emergency calls on March 1 and has also started offering vaccines to people experiencing homelessness.

The province has said the recently approved Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will go to residents between the ages of 60 and 64.

A pilot project is set to launch Friday at more than 300 pharmacies in Toronto, Kingston and Windsor to give the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot to those aged 60 to 64.

The health minister has also said the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot could be used in correctional facilities, but further details haven’t been released.

Manitoba

Manitoba is starting to vaccinate people in the general population. Appointments are now available for most people aged 94 and up, or 74 and up for First Nations people. Until now, vaccines have been directed to certain groups such as health-care workers and people in personal care homes. Health officials plan to reduce the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

Dr. Joss Reimer, medical lead of the province’s vaccine task force, has said inoculations could be open to all adults in the province by August if supplies are steady.

Like British Columbia, Manitoba has already indicated it would opt for a four-month interval between doses.

Saskatchewan

The province is still in the first phase of its vaccination rollout, which reserves doses for long-term care residents and staff, health-care workers at elevated risk of COVID-19 exposure, seniors over the age of 70 and anyone 50 or older living in a remote area. In all, nearly 400,000 doses are required to finish this stage.

The next phase will be focused on vaccinating the general population by age.

It hopes to begin its mass vaccination campaign by April, but there if there isn’t enough supply that could be pushed back to June. Saskatchewan will begin immunizing the general population in 10-year increments, starting with those 60 to 69. Also included in this age group will be people living in emergency shelters, individuals with intellectual disabilities in care homes and people who are medically vulnerable.

Police, corrections staff and teachers are among the front-line workers not prioritized for early access to shots. The government says supply is scarce.

Premier Scott Moe said Thursday that people will get their second shot up to four months after the first, which falls in line with a recent recommendation from Canada’s national immunization committee.

Alberta 

Alberta’s health minister says 437,000 people can soon begin booking appointments for the next round of COVID-19 vaccinations and the province hopes to hit a major milestone before July.

Tyler Shandro said the province expects to offer all Albertans aged 18 and over a first dose of vaccine by the end of June.

So far, Alberta has delivered 266,000 doses of vaccine. About 176,000 Albertans have been vaccinated, including 90,000 fully immunized with the recommended two doses.

Shandro said residents aged 65 to 74, and First Nations, Inuit and Metis aged 50-plus, can begin booking March 15. The province had originally not expected to begin this stage of vaccination until April.

The AstraZeneca vaccine will for now be offered to adults aged 50 to 64 who don’t have a severe chronic illness.

Alberta has also said it will follow other provinces by extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months.

British Columbia

British Columbia will extend the time between the first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines to four months so all adults could get their initial shot by the end of July.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says evidence from the province and around the world shows protection of at least 90 per cent from the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines.

The province launched the second phase of its immunization campaign March 1 and health authorities began contacting residents and staff of independent living centres, those living in seniors’ supportive housing as well as homecare support clients and staff.

Health Minister Adrian Dix said, as of Thursday, health authorities across the province can schedule COVID-19 vaccine appointments for people aged 85 and older.

Health authorities started scheduling COVID-19 vaccine appointments for people aged 90 and older Indigenous people 65 years and up on Monday.

Henry has said the approval of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine means some people will get their first shot sooner than planned.

She said B.C. will focus its rollout of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine among essential workers, first responders and younger people with more social interactions who would have to wait longer to receive their first doses of the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines.

It’s now possible that all adults could get their first shot by July, Henry said.

Nunavut

The territory says it expects enough vaccines for 75 per cent of its population over the age of 18.

After a COVID-19 vaccine is administered, patients will be tracked to ensure they are properly notified to receive their second dose.

Nunavut’s priority populations are being vaccinated first. They include residents of shelters, people ages 60 years and up, staff and inmates and correctional facilities, first responders and front-line health-care staff.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories its priority groups — such as people over 60, front-line health workers and those living in remote communities — are being vaccinated

The territory says it expects to vaccine the rest of its adult population starting this month.

Yukon

Yukon says it will receive enough vaccine to immunize 75 per cent of its adult population by the end of March.

Priority for vaccinations has been given to residents and staff in long-term care homes, group homes and shelters, as well as health-care workers and personal support workers. People over the age of 80 who are not living in long-term care, and those living in rural and remote communities, including Indigenous Peoples, are also on the priority list for shots.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 11, 2021.

The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Wednesday, March 10, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Mar 10th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, March 10, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 77,818 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,543,253 doses given. Nationwide, 579,032 people or 1.5 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 6,710.558 per 100,000.

There were 143,910 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 3,082,480 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 82.51 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland is reporting 4,472 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 24,757 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 47.279 per 1,000. In the province, 1.61 per cent (8,427) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 41,470 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 59.7 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 1,593 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 14,189 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 89.448 per 1,000. In the province, 3.48 per cent (5,514) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 15,885 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 10 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.32 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 6,760 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 40,231 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 41.225 per 1,000. In the province, 1.49 per cent (14,542) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 73,680 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 54.6 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 4,742 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 38,483 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 49.335 per 1,000. In the province, 1.56 per cent (12,152) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 56,135 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 68.55 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 16,726 new vaccinations administered for a total of 581,028 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 67.904 per 1,000. There were 100,620 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 739,065 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 8.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 78.62 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 31,047 new vaccinations administered for a total of 943,533 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 64.234 per 1,000. In the province, 1.88 per cent (276,193) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 1,086,745 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.82 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 1,826 new vaccinations administered for a total of 92,753 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 67.359 per 1,000. In the province, 2.22 per cent (30,595) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 124,840 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.1 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 74.3 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 736 new vaccinations administered for a total of 93,512 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 79.304 per 1,000. In the province, 2.38 per cent (28,025) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 93,145 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 100.4 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 6,131 new vaccinations administered for a total of 303,823 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 69.019 per 1,000. In the province, 2.07 per cent (91,138) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 326,445 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.07 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 10,054 new vaccinations administered for a total of 343,381 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 66.915 per 1,000. In the province, 1.69 per cent (86,938) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 43,290 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 428,370 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 8.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.16 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 891 new vaccinations administered for a total of 24,412 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 584.985 per 1,000. In the territory, 21.18 per cent (8,840) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 35,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 84 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 69.75 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting 8,433 new vaccinations administered for a total of 28,208 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 625.191 per 1,000. In the territory, 24.71 per cent (11,151) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 35,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 78 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 79.91 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 279 new vaccinations administered for a total of 14,943 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 385.865 per 1,000. In the territory, 14.25 per cent (5,517) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 26,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 56.6 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 10, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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