1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Latest Posts

Alberta’s Kenney to field questions on new COVID rules, looming hospital crisis

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, May 5th, 2021

EDMONTON — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and key members of his United Conservative cabinet are to provide more details and answer questions this morning on new COVID-19 health restrictions.

Kenney introduced tougher rules last night but didn’t take questions from reporters.

The changes include closing schools to in-person learning on Friday and ordering barbershops, hair salons and restaurant patios to shut down as of Sunday.

The premier says the rules are necessary to arrest a surging wave of COVID-19 cases that will otherwise overwhelm the health system in the next few weeks.

Alberta has more than 150 people in intensive care with the illness and its COVID-19 case rates are the highest in North America.

The Opposition NDP says once again Kenney is doing too little, too late with little warning to those affected.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 5, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How are you? I am fine: What we lose without small talk

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, May 5th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, how many strangers have you chatted with recently? Probably not a lot. And while your immediate reaction to that might be, “Great, I hate talking to strangers about nothing”—the research doesn’t back you up.

Casual small talk plays a larger role in our well-being than we assume it does, and most of us are doing much, much less of it these days. What does that mean for our happiness? And for our pathetic attempts at chit-chat once we emerge back into a world full of random social interactions?

GUEST: Hannah Seo (You can read Hannah’s piece in The Walruses)

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, May 4th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada says up to 37 million doses of vaccine could be shipped in May and June, but only 20.3 million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and 1.04 million doses of Moderna are confirmed. The remaining 11.3 million doses of Moderna, and another four million doses of Oxford-AstraZeneca from various sources are still tentative.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

Provinces have yet to move the threshold quite that low, however.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16. Health Canada is currently reviewing an application from Pfizer to lower the age for that vaccine to 12.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Residents between the ages of 55 to 64 have access to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

People 65 and older, Indigenous adults, people considered “clinically extremely vulnerable” and rotational workers, truck drivers and flight crew have access to the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Nova Scotia

Residents as young as 55 can now book an appointment for a Pfizer of Moderna vaccine.

The province has also expanded access to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to residents aged 40 to 54.

Prince Edward Island

People in the province aged 40 to 59 can now book appointments for a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

New Brunswick

People as young as 60 can begin booking vaccination appointments.

Individuals 40 years old and older with three or more select chronic health conditions are also eligible.

Officials said the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine would be available to people aged 40 to 54 by April 30.

Quebec

Quebecers aged 45 and up are now eligible to book an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccine.

The province announced last week that it is gradually widening vaccine access to the rest of the general population in descending order of age.

Over the next two weeks, appointments will open to Quebecers in descending order of age — dropping by five years every two or three days — until May 14, when they will be available to people aged 18 to 24.

Quebec has also expanded AstraZeneca availability to people as young as 45.

Ontario

Ontario is expanding access to COVID-19 vaccines across the province starting this week.

All adults 18 and older living in 114 specific postal codes designated as virus hot spots can book their shots through the provincial portal as of 8 a.m. May 3.

And bookings will be open to all residents 50 and older starting on Thursday (May 6), as well as those with high-risk health conditions such as obesity, developmental disabilities and treatments requiring immunosuppression.

A group of employees who cannot work from home − including food manufacturing workers and foster care workers − also become eligible.

Health Minister Christine Elliott says the expansion is possible thanks to a more steady supply of COVID-19 vaccines.

The province has said that if the vaccine supply holds, it expects to make those 18 and older eligible for a shot at mass sites provincewide on the week of May 24.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for all Indigenous people aged 18 and up and others aged 50 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

All front-line police officers and firefighters, regardless of age, qualify as well. All adults who are pregnant, who receive community living disability services or who work in any health-care setting — including outpatient locations and the province’s vaccine warehouse — can book an appointment as well.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability. People 30-39 can get a shot if they have certain underlying health conditions such as chronic liver failure or severe obesity.

The province is also vaccinating all adults in high-risk areas, including the north of the province and core areas of Winnipeg and Brandon.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority has opened up bookings for residents aged 37 and older. In the Far North, all adults are eligible.

All front-line workers over 18 can also get vaccinations. From Wednesday to Friday of this week, truck drivers and essential energy workers can get shots in Kenmare, N.D.

The province previously expanded its vaccine delivery plan for people in more vulnerable groups to include all pregnant women and 16- and 17-year-olds who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Saskatchewan also dropped the age at which people can receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province. Some pharmacies that are part of a pilot program are also providing shots.

Alberta

Teachers and child-care workers are now included for priority vaccinations.

On April 30, the final two groups in Phase 2 become eligible. They include vulnerable Albertans and those who support them, workers at locations with potential for large outbreaks, those 50 and older, and all First Nations, Inuit and Metis people aged 35 and older.

Also included are front-line police officers and provincial sheriffs who interact with residents at shelters, correctional facilities and remand centres, border security staff and firefighters.

Albertans born in 2009 or earlier with high-risk underlying health conditions are eligible for shots.

Health-care workers can still book appointments: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, their office staff, lab workers, practicum students in clinical areas, as well as health workers on First Nations reserves and Metis settlements.

Previously, shots have been available to front-line health workers, staff and residents in supportive living facilities.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province has lowered the minimum age to 40 from 55. For those living in the hot spots of Banff and Lake Louise as well as the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, the age for AstraZeneca is 30.

The Moderna vaccine is also available to Indigenous people in Wood Buffalo as young as 30.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and health clinics.

Alberta has said it is extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months. But some cancer patients are able to book a second dose 21 to 28 days after their first.

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans 18 and over a first dose by the end of June.

British Columbia

With more than one million doses of COVID-19 vaccines arriving in May, British Columbia health officials say they are looking at whether they can reduce the 16-week wait time between first and second shots for most people.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says the province expects to receive 1.1 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine this month along with more shipments of the Moderna vaccine.

But Henry says it’s still too early to estimate the possible change in wait times.

About 1.87 million people have received a first vaccine dose and 91,731 have had their second shot.

All adults over the age of 18 are eligible to register for vaccines through the province’s Get Vaccinated program.

Health authorities have also been targeting so-called hot spot communities that have been hardest hit by COVID-19 with dedicated clinics, which the provincial government says are using its “limited” supply of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

B.C. has lowered the age for those eligible to receive the AstraZeneca shot to 30, starting with those in ‘hot spot’ communities and adding appointments at pharmacies as supplies improve.

Nunavut

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from Southern Canada.

The territory had expected to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is also providing vaccine to those 18 and older and had expected to finish its rollout by the end of April.

It is similarly offering shots to rotational workers and mine employees coming from southern Canada.

Yukon

More than 48,000 doses of Moderna vaccine have been administered in Yukon.

More than 70 per cent of Yukon residents have received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, and more than 53 per cent of the population has now been fully vaccinated.

Health officials say that means they can reduce the hours of operation at the Whitehorse vaccine clinic.

Deputy health minister Stephen Samis says they’ll scale down operations and focus some efforts on other vaccinations, including pre-kindergarten and routine childhood vaccines.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 4, 2021.

The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Tuesday, May 4, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, May 4th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Tuesday May 4, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 226,014 new vaccinations administered for a total of 14,051,490 doses given. Nationwide, 1,136,877 people or 3.0 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 37,075.879 per 100,000.

There were 90,500 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 14,952,634 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 93.97 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 16,869 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 181,653 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 346.91 per 1,000. In the province, 1.85 per cent (9,676) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 8,300 new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 209,050 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 40 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.89 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 6,924 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 53,202 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 335.386 per 1,000. In the province, 6.67 per cent (10,585) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 61,735 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 39 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.18 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 44,835 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 320,910 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 328.836 per 1,000. In the province, 3.75 per cent (36,600) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 372,850 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.07 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 27,418 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 271,891 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 348.56 per 1,000. In the province, 3.46 per cent (27,015) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 298,495 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 91.09 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 38,187 new vaccinations administered for a total of 3,256,401 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 380.57 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 3,448,799 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 40 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 94.42 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 53,880 new vaccinations administered for a total of 5,378,249 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 366.139 per 1,000. In the province, 2.56 per cent (375,905) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 5,644,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.27 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 4,185 new vaccinations administered for a total of 495,482 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 359.826 per 1,000. In the province, 5.33 per cent (73,445) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 553,890 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 40 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.45 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 7,154 new vaccinations administered for a total of 450,823 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 382.327 per 1,000. In the province, 3.78 per cent (44,527) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 460,755 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 39 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 97.84 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 18,997 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,640,303 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 372.623 per 1,000. In the province, 6.85 per cent (301,398) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 1,694,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 39 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 96.77 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 90,558 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,877,330 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 365.839 per 1,000. In the province, 1.79 per cent (91,731) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 82,200 new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 2,054,690 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 40 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 91.37 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 348 new vaccinations administered for a total of 48,655 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,165.92 per 1,000. In the territory, 54.29 per cent (22,657) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 54,320 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 130 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 89.57 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting 1,207 new vaccinations administered for a total of 48,007 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,064.009 per 1,000. In the territory, 48.04 per cent (21,674) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 56,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 85.27 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 333 new vaccinations administered for a total of 28,584 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 738.109 per 1,000. In the territory, 32.35 per cent (12,529) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 41,800 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 110 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 68.38 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 4, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Did this pandemic teach us how to tackle the climate crisis?

THE BIG STORY | posted Tuesday, May 4th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, a year ago we never would have imagined that humanity could collectively change its work habits so quickly, or that governments could unveil ambitious national programs so quickly. We all saw a silver lining last Spring when the global shutdown brought with it clearer waters and skies and a record drop in emissions.

If we’re smart enough to harness what we’ve learned over the past 15 months, it could go a long way in the fight to keep our planet livable. If we don’t … we could end up right back where we started. Are we smart enough to apply pandemic lessons to the climate crisis?

GUEST: Catherine Abreu, Executive Director, Climate Action Network Canada

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, May 3, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 3rd, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Monday May 3, 2021.

There are 1,234,180 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 1,234,180 confirmed cases (83,744 active, 1,126,136 resolved, 24,300 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 7,147 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 220.35 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 53,466 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,638.

There were 39 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 321 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 46. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.94 per 100,000 people.

There have been 31,756,698 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,088 confirmed cases (44 active, 1,038 resolved, six deaths).

There were seven new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 8.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 30 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 243,744 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 182 confirmed cases (13 active, 169 resolved, zero deaths).

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 8.14 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been seven new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 144,379 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 2,708 confirmed cases (822 active, 1,819 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 133 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 83.93 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 655 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 94.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 581,746 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 1,939 confirmed cases (137 active, 1,765 resolved, 37 deaths).

There were six new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 17.53 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 88 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 13.

There was one new reported death Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.73 per 100,000 people.

There have been 302,589 tests completed.

Quebec: 351,880 confirmed cases (9,425 active, 331,513 resolved, 10,942 deaths).

There were 1,006 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 109.92 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,072 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,010.

There were nine new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 64 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 127.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,331,503 tests completed.

Ontario: 470,465 confirmed cases (37,200 active, 425,163 resolved, 8,102 deaths).

There were 3,732 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 252.48 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 25,114 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,588.

There were 23 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 191 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 27. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.99 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,001,507 tests completed.

Manitoba: 39,274 confirmed cases (2,540 active, 35,756 resolved, 978 deaths).

There were 281 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 184.16 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,676 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 239.

There were two new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 11 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.91 per 100,000 people.

There have been 682,338 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 41,598 confirmed cases (2,436 active, 38,667 resolved, 495 deaths).

There were 238 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 206.67 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,666 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 238.

There was one new reported death Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 20 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.24 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 42 per 100,000 people.

There have been 772,100 tests completed.

Alberta: 194,898 confirmed cases (22,920 active, 169,892 resolved, 2,086 deaths).

There were 1,731 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 518.33 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 13,092 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,870.

There were three new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 19 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 47.17 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,166,499 tests completed.

British Columbia: 129,482 confirmed cases (8,116 active, 119,785 resolved, 1,581 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 157.66 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,996 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 571.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 13 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.71 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,490,477 tests completed.

Yukon: 81 confirmed cases (zero active, 79 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.34 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,975 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 52 confirmed cases (seven active, 45 resolved, zero deaths).

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 15.5 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been four new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 18,465 tests completed.

Nunavut: 520 confirmed cases (84 active, 432 resolved, four deaths).

There were 11 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 213.45 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 65 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is nine.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 12,300 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 3, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Shared smoking breaks, broken rules: What led to Nunavut’s first COVID-19 cases?

EMMA TRANTER, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 3rd, 2021

Broken isolation rules, shared cigarettes and fear of extended isolation periods are some of the findings in a report that sheds light on how Nunavut’s first cases of COVID-19 suddenly appeared last November.

For eight months, while outbreaks erupted across the country, Nunavut remained free of infection, with the exception of some cases among mine workers from outside the territory.

That was partly because Nunavut has some of the tightest public health measures in the country. In March 2020, the territory restricted travel to residents only and required anyone who left to complete a 14-day isolation period in a hotel outside Nunavut before returning.

But health officials repeatedly warned that it was not a matter of if, but when COVID-19 would show up.

On Nov. 6, 2020, Nunavut reported its first case of the novel coronavirus in Sanikiluaq, a Hudson Bay community of about 850 people. It soon appeared in other communities, including Arviat, where an outbreak swelled to 339 cases in the community of about 2,800.

Health officials confirmed the first cases came from Nunavummiut who had completed 14 days of isolation down south, but there were no further details.

The isolation hubs are in Yellowknife, Edmonton, Winnipeg and Ottawa. They are funded by the territorial and federal governments. Day-to-day operations are run by Qikiqtaaluk Corp., a Nunavut-based company offering sanitary services and contracted by the territory.

Nunavut’s Health Department determined the infected people had completed isolation at Winnipeg hotels in October and November. The government ordered a third party to review what had happened.

That report, obtained through a Canadian Press access-to-information request, looks at five guests and one security guard who tested positive.

It says some guests at one Winnipeg hotel didn’t report their symptoms, while some were asymptomatic. One guest had symptoms the day after checking in, but was not tested until eight days later.

The review also found that some guests shared things like cigarettes and lighters while on smoking breaks outside. To resolve that, the Health Department recommended a smoking break schedule be developed.

Guests must stay in their rooms for most of the isolation period, but are allowed to go outside for smoke breaks and to get fresh air and exercise.

“The process for communicating expectations to guests regarding their stay was ineffective … which decreased the likelihood of compliance with isolation hub expectations,” the report says.

The review also found some guests were “fearful of having their isolation stays extended” beyond the 14 days. That “led to guests not reporting their symptoms, which increased the likelihood of guests unknowingly having COVID-19.”

As a result, voluntary COVID-19 testing was put in place at all of Nunavut’s southern isolation hubs.

Another concern outlined in the report is that the protocol for managing positive cases was “unclear.” That led to guests being admitted “without the appropriate safety protocol.”

At one point, guests were sent back to the isolation hub after their flight to Nunavut was cancelled, which led to potential exposure between guests, the report says.

Isolation guests are called by a public health nurse once a day and a temperature check is done before guests are cleared to fly.

Some guests also faced cultural and language barriers that could have increased the chance of COVID-19 going undetected.

“Many staff did not have a comprehensive understanding of the cultural aspects of care, which led to misinterpretation of guest body language (and) increased the likelihood that symptoms would be inaccurately captured.”

The report also says interpretation services were not readily available.

Dr. Anna Banerji, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto, said standard operating procedures, consistent messaging and proper cultural safety training is essential in Nunavut’s isolation hubs.

“If someone has an exposure or has symptoms, and they can’t communicate that or they don’t understand the isolation, there are some significant problems,” Banerji said.

“They need people working there who speak the language … and people who are able to enforce the isolation.”

Banerji also said the isolation period loses its purpose if guests don’t distance themselves from others while outside.

“If there are people there who have COVID and they are mingling with each other, then this isolation hub loses its effectiveness.”

Testing at isolation hubs is critical, especially when people are asymptomatic, Banerji added.

“COVID is a very hard disease to manage because it can be transmitted with no symptoms … If you’re trying to prevent outbreaks in the community there should be mandatory testing.”

The Canadian Press reached out to Nunavut’s Health department for an interview but did not receive a response.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 3, 2021.

___

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

‘He loved Nova Scotia.’ Former premier Donald Cameron dead at 74

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 3rd, 2021

HALIFAX — The leader of Nova Scotia’s Progressive Conservative party has issued a statement saying Donald Cameron, the province’s 22nd premier, has died.

Tory Leader Tim Houston described Cameron as a mentor with incredible integrity.

Cameron, who was 74, served as premier from February 1991 to May 1993.

Houston says Cameron’s government introduced pioneering human rights legislation that called for equal rights for gay and lesbian people.

Cameron retired from politics the night his party was defeated in a general election by the Liberals, led by John Savage.

In June 1993, then prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Cameron to serve as consul general in Boston.

“He loved Nova Scotia and during his time in public and private life, Donnie was a man of incredible integrity.” Houston said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 3, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Friday, April 30, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 30th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Friday, April 30, 2021.

There are 1,211,083 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 1,211,083 confirmed cases (83,452 active, 1,103,462 resolved, 24,169 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 8,348 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 219.58 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 55,241 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,892.

There were 57 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 347 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 50. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.59 per 100,000 people.

There have been 31,325,175 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,068 confirmed cases (31 active, 1,031 resolved, six deaths).

There were two new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 5.94 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 241,615 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 179 confirmed cases (11 active, 168 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 6.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 141,950 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 2,360 confirmed cases (548 active, 1,745 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 70 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 55.96 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 466 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 67.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 538,842 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,900 confirmed cases (119 active, 1,745 resolved, 36 deaths).

There were 10 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 15.23 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 77 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 11.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 296,955 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 348,732 confirmed cases (9,954 active, 327,865 resolved, 10,913 deaths).

There were 1,042 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 116.09 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,087 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,012.

There were 10 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 68 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 127.27 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,212,465 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 459,477 confirmed cases (38,438 active, 413,010 resolved, 8,029 deaths).

There were 3,871 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 260.88 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 26,672 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,810.

There were 41 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 200 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 29. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.49 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,844,691 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 38,439 confirmed cases (2,263 active, 35,203 resolved, 973 deaths).

There were 230 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 164.07 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,551 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 222.

There were two new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 11 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 672,935 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 40,824 confirmed cases (2,408 active, 37,929 resolved, 487 deaths).

There were 210 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 204.3 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,677 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 240.

There was one new reported death Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 41.32 per 100,000 people.

There have been 760,974 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 188,727 confirmed cases (21,385 active, 165,267 resolved, 2,075 deaths).

There were 2,048 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 483.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,640 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,663.

There were two new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 21 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,106,488 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 128,742 confirmed cases (8,228 active, 118,937 resolved, 1,577 deaths).

There were 853 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 159.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,985 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 855.

There was one new reported death Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 27 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,469,265 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 81 confirmed cases (zero active, 79 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.34 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,928 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 51 confirmed cases (six active, 45 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 13.29 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 18,264 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 490 confirmed cases (61 active, 425 resolved, four deaths).

There were 12 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 155.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 58 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is eight.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,727 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 30, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Page 1 of 8312345...102030...Last »