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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jun 3rd, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on June 3, 2020:

There are 92,410 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 51,593 confirmed (including 4,713 deaths, 16,803 resolved)

_ Ontario: 28,709 confirmed (including 2,293 deaths, 22,484 resolved)

_ Alberta: 7,057 confirmed (including 143 deaths, 6,537 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 2,601 confirmed (including 165 deaths, 2,229 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,057 confirmed (including 60 deaths, 992 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 646 confirmed (including 11 deaths, 602 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 286 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 278 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 256 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 133 confirmed (including 120 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 27 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 92,410 (11 presumptive, 92,399 confirmed including 7,395 deaths, 50,357 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 3, 2020.

The Canadian Press

LOCAL VIDEO CONTACT US News Alerts 18°Light Rainshower Defence Department accused of using pandemic to withhold info from Parliament

LEE BERTHIAUME, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jun 3rd, 2020

OTTAWA — The Department of National Defence stands accused of trying to take advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic to withhold information from Parliament and Canadians.

There has been widespread concern about federal departments failing to respond to access-to-information requests since the crisis first started in earnest in March, but the Opposition Conservatives say the problem is much worse at the Defence Department.

“By far National Defence is the worst offender,” said Conservative defence critic James Bezan. “There seems to be a systemic breakdown in being transparent in the department, or there’s intentional disregard for what Canadians have been requesting.”

The allegation stems from the department’s failure in recent months to respond to a large number of questions on the order paper, which are one of the primary means for members of Parliament to get information about the inner workings of federal departments.

Departments have 45 days to respond to order paper questions, which include everything from the number of veterans receiving government-subsidized Viagra to how much the government spent on advertising to the number of RCMP officers by province.

Yet in more than a dozen recent requests, the Defence Department did not respond. One of those asked how many government ships had broken down in the last year. While the Canadian Coast Guard provided a response, the Defence Department did not.

“During the unprecedented COVID-19 situation, public servants are required to work remotely and have limited access to the tools and files requested,” the department wrote in response to a recent request by Conservative MP Lianne Rood.

Bezan also flagged concerns about testimony from parliamentary budget officer Yves Giroux to a House of Commons’ committee last week about the watchdog’s request for updated information on the government’s plan to invest billions in new military kit.

“We were supposed to get the information on time to provide parliamentarians with an update,” Giroux told the standing committee on government operations and estimates on Friday.

“May was the target date for us, but we didn’t get the information on time. … We were told it will be delayed by a couple of weeks, but we have not received it yet.”

The Liberal government’s defence policy unveiled in 2017 promised $553 billion in defence spending over the next two decades, though it has been slow in getting that money out the door.

The Defence Department acknowledged it had failed to respond to 17 order paper questions in April and May and was unable to provide the information that Giroux asked to see about the planned defence spending, citing COVID-19 as the reason.

“Work on the request the PBO referred to has, in fact, been impacted by COVID-19 given the requirements for our analysts to work from secure systems inaccessible from home,” Defence Department spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier said an in email.

He went on to blame personnel having “limited access to certain records and databases” and “key military staff” being tasked with supporting the government’s COVID-19 response for not responding to the order paper question.

At the same time, Le Bouthillier said officials did respond to 12 order paper questions while Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan’s office said officials helped the budget officer analyze the cost of the military’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in April.

“The Department of National Defence and the women and men of the Canadian Armed Forces have been working around the clock helping Canadians during this pandemic,” Sajjan’s spokesman, Todd Lane, said in a statement.

“Despite the challenges that the pandemic has posed, we remain committed to transparency and being accountable to Parliament.”

Bezan nonetheless accused the government and department of failing to provide information to Canadians and parliamentarians, whose job is to hold the government to account.

“At the beginning (of the pandemic), I would say they had the right to make those decisions,” he said. “But we’re getting to a point now that this has become a government and Minister Sajjan, in particular, stonewalling the accountability aspect of his role.”

If there are legitimate concerns, he added, efforts should be underway to install proper protocols and provide adequate safety equipment to let defence officials return to their offices and “fulfil the obligations the government has to Parliament.”

Treasury Board President Jean-Yves Duclos, who is responsible for public access to government information, sent a letter to his cabinet colleagues last week reminding them of the need for transparency even during the COVID-19 pandemic

The message followed calls from information commissioner Caroline Maynard, the Canadian Association of Journalists and an ad-hoc accountability group for concrete actions to ensure transparency during the crisis.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 3, 2020.

Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

Trump decries ‘lowlifes’ and racism in Canada; In The News for June 3

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jun 3rd, 2020

In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what’s on the radar of our editors for the morning of June 3 …

American anti-racism protests …

Undeterred by curfews, protesters streamed back into the nation’s streets Tuesday, hours after President Donald Trump pressed governors to put down the violence set off by George Floyd’s death and demanded that New York call up the National Guard to stop the “lowlifes and losers.”

But most protests passed peacefully, and while there were scattered reports of looting in New York City, the country appeared calmer by late Tuesday than it did a day earlier, when violence swept through multiple cities.

The president, meanwhile, amplified his hard-line calls from Monday, when he threatened to send in the military to restore order if governors didn’t do it.

“NYC, CALL UP THE NATIONAL GUARD,” he tweeted. “The lowlifes and losers are ripping you apart. Act fast!”

One day after a crackdown on peaceful protesters near the White House, thousands of demonstrators massed a block away from the presidential mansion, facing law enforcement personnel standing behind a black chain-link fence. The fence was put up overnight to block access to Lafayette Park, just across the street from the White House.

“Last night pushed me way over the edge,” said Jessica DeMaio, 40, of Washington, who attended a Floyd protest Tuesday for the first time. “Being here is better than being at home feeling helpless.”

The crowd remained in place after the city’s 7 p.m. curfew passed, defying warnings that the response from law enforcement could be even more forceful. But the protest lacked the tension of the previous nights’ demonstrations. The crowd Tuesday was peaceful, even polite. At one point, the crowd booed when a protester climbed a light post and took down a street sign. A chant went up: “Peaceful protest!”

COVID-19 in Canada …

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will continue today to make the case for a co-ordinated global response to cushion the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the world’s poorest countries.

He’ll be among the leaders and heads of state to deliver remarks during a virtual summit of the Organization of African, Caribbean, and Pacific States (OACPS).

Among other things, he is expected to promise that Canada will partner with developing countries, which stand to be the hardest hit by the pandemic, and help to rally the world behind measures like debt relief to help them survive the crisis.

That is similar to the message Trudeau delivered last week while co-hosting a major United Nations summit, alongside UN secretary general Antonio Guterres and Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness.

Without a global co-ordinated recovery plan, the UN estimates the pandemic could slash nearly US$8.5 trillion from the world economy over the next two years, forcing 34.3 million people into extreme poverty this year and potentially 130 million more over the course of the decade.

While no country has escaped the economic ravages of the deadly novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, developing countries, already in debt distress before the pandemic, cannot afford the kinds of emergency benefits and economic stimulus measures undertaken in wealthy, industrialized countries like Canada.

And this …

Nova Scotia’s largest nursing home is planning for a future of private rooms to keep residents safe, but it has taken a wrenching pandemic death toll to create the shift — and it remains unclear whether government will fund a long-term fix.

“We’re currently down to fewer than 25 rooms with shared accommodations at the Halifax campus,” Janet Simm, the Northwood facility’s chief executive, said in a recent interview.

That’s a huge shift from before the pandemic when more than 240 residents lived in two- or three-person units. Now, fewer than 50 people remain in the shared spaces, some of whom are couples or others who specifically request a roommate, Simm said.

But the facility’s desire to create more space, which its board sought for years before the pandemic, unfolded through tragedy rather than design.

COVID-19 illnesses spread among the 485 residents after asymptomatic workers brought the virus there in early April, and Simm says the bulk of the 53 who had died, as of Tuesday, and the 240 infected were in shared units.

COVID-19 in sports …

Khari Jones doesn’t have to look far for a reminder that racism exists in Canada.

The Montreal Alouettes head coach divulged during a teleconference Tuesday he received death threats while he was the quarterback of the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers because of his interracial marriage. Jones is black and his wife, Justine, is white.

An emotional Jones — speaking just over a week after a white policeman kneeled on the neck of a black man, resulting in a tragic death in Minneapolis — said the threats came in the form of letters that remain in his possession.

“It’s just a reminder you always have to be on alert a little bit,” Jones said. “It could’ve been one person but one is still too many and to do that on the basis of a person’s skin colour is horrible.

“Every once in a while, every blue moon I take a look at them. They never found the person who wrote the letters — he used a fake name — but he’s still out there, people like him are still out there. That was 20-something years ago and it’s still happening.”

Interest rate announcement looms …

The Bank of Canada is expected to keep its key interest rate unchanged this morning on the first day of governor Tiff Macklem’s tenure.

Economists expect the central bank will maintain its target for the overnight rate at 0.25 per cent, which former governor Stephen Poloz has repeatedly said is as low as it can go.

Poloz and the bank’s governing council would have met over the past few days and finalized the rate decision last night.

Macklem likely would have been part of the meetings, but it’s unlikely that the language of the rate announcement will fully capture his views.

Instead of focusing on the rate itself, experts say they will be paying close attention to the language used in the rate announcement about the expected path for the economy in the coming weeks and months.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 3, 2020

The Canadian Press

Canadian health officials urge rally-goers to keep COVID-19 in mind

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

OTTAWA — As protesters keep up their anti-racism rallies on both sides of the border, top health officials are hoping they don’t forget about the risk of COVID-19.

Canadian health officials are not suggesting people avoid protests, but they are stressing the importance of hand sanitizer and masks.

With physical distance being nearly impossible in some of these settings, rally-goers may have to find other ways to try to keep themselves safe.

Protests have taken place in several Canadian cities in the aftermath of a black man dying last week in Minneapolis after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck.

George Floyd’s death has sent throngs into the streets in several U.S. and Canadian cities to decry systemic racism and police brutality.

Meanwhile, House of Commons Speaker Anthony Rota is scheduled today to appear at a committee on procedure and House affairs.

He is expected to discuss the hybrid parliament and how it is functioning during the pandemic.

The Senate finance committee also meets today with many major industry leaders set to appear.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 2, 2020

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on June 2, 2020:

There are 91,705 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 51,354 confirmed (including 4,661 deaths, 16,597 resolved)

_ Ontario: 28,263 confirmed (including 2,276 deaths, 22,153 resolved)

_ Alberta: 7,044 confirmed (including 143 deaths, 6,501 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 2,597 confirmed (including 165 deaths, 2,207 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,057 confirmed (including 60 deaths, 984 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 646 confirmed (including 11 deaths, 588 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 284 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 278 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 255 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 132 confirmed (including 120 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 27 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 91,705 (11 presumptive, 91,694 confirmed including 7,326 deaths, 49,739 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 2, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Trump threatens military force and Snowbird crash investigation; In The News for June 2

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what’s on the radar of our editors for the morning of June 2 …

American anti-racism protests …

Wielding extraordinary federal authority, President Donald Trump threatened the nation’s governors that he would deploy the military to states if they did not stamp out violent protests over police brutality that have roiled the nation over the past week. His announcement came as police under federal command forced back peaceful demonstrators with tear gas so he could walk to a nearby church and pose with a Bible.

Trump’s bellicose rhetoric came as the nation convulsed through another round of violence over the death of George Floyd at a time when the country is already buckling under the coronavirus outbreak and the Depression-level unemployment it has caused. The president demanded an end to the heated protests in remarks from the White House Rose Garden and vowed to use more force to achieve that aim.

If governors throughout the country do not deploy the National Guard in sufficient numbers to “dominate the streets,” Trump said the U.S. military would step in to “quickly solve the problem for them.”

“We have the greatest country in the world,” the president declared. “We’re going to keep it safe.”

A military deployment by Trump to U.S. states would mark a stunning federal intervention rarely seen in modern American history. Yet the message Trump appeared to be sending with the brazen pushback of protesters outside the White House was that he sees few limits to what he is willing to do.

Some around the president likened the moment to 1968, when Richard Nixon ran as the law-and-order candidate in the aftermath of a summer of riots, capturing the White House. But despite his efforts to portray himself as a political outsider, Trump is an incumbent who risks being held responsible for the violence.

Minutes before Trump began speaking, police and National Guard soldiers began aggressively forcing back hundreds of peaceful protesters who had gathered in Lafayette Park, across the street from the White House, where they were chanting against police brutality and Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. As Trump spoke, tear gas canisters could be heard exploding.

Also this …

As protesters keep up their anti-racism rallies on both sides of the border, top health officials are hoping they don’t forget about the risk of COVID-19.

Canadian health officials are not suggesting people avoid protests, but they are stressing the importance of hand sanitizer and masks.

With physical distance being nearly impossible in some of these settings, rally-goers may have to find other ways to try to keep themselves safe.

Protests have taken place in several Canadian cities in the aftermath of a black man dying last week in Minneapolis after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck.

George Floyd’s death has sent throngs into the streets in several U.S. and Canadian cities to decry systemic racism and police brutality.

Meanwhile, House of Commons Speaker Anthony Rota is scheduled today to appear at a committee on procedure and House affairs.

He is expected to discuss the hybrid parliament and how it is functioning during the pandemic.

The Senate finance committee also meets today with many major industry leaders set to appear.

COVID-19 in Ontario …

Ontario is expected today to extend its state of emergency until June 30.

The measure bans gatherings larger than five people.

It also orders the closure of some businesses such as restaurants and bars, except if they offer takeout or delivery.

If the vote passes, the measure — which had been set to expire today — will be extended for another 28 days.

Ontario declared a state of emergency on March 17 as COVID-19 cases began to climb in the province.

COVID-19 in sports …

It looks like hockey fans will be able to cheer on their favourite NHL team this summer but Canadians have issued a collective shrug about whether the Stanley Cup is hoisted on their home ice.

Less than one-quarter of those who took part in a recent survey said it was very important that a Canadian city be host to some of the playoffs.

The web survey, conducted by polling firm Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies, found 47 per cent thought it wasn’t important that the puck drop in a Canadian arena.

The NHL plans to resume its 2019-20 season, brought to a halt in March by the COVID-19 pandemic, with games played in two hub cities.

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto are among the 10 possible locations, but Canada’s mandatory 14-day quarantine for people entering the country remains in place and could scuttle the prospect of hockey north of the 49th parallel.

Snowbird crash investigation …

Military investigators are pointing to video footage as the reason they suspect a bird strike was been responsible for last month’s deadly Snowbird plane crash in British Columbia.

The crash was May 18, shortly after two of the Snowbirds’ iconic Tutor jets took off from the Kamloops Airport while participating in a cross-country tour aimed at boosting Canadians’ morale during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Video posted to social media shortly after the crash showed one of the planes climbing a few seconds after leaving the runway before rolling over in the air and plummeting into a residential neighbourhood.

The crash killed Capt. Jenn Casey, the Snowbirds’ public-affairs officer who was riding as a passenger, while the pilot, Capt. Richard MacDougall, sustained serious but non-life-threatening injuries. Both ejected from the plane seconds before it hit the ground.

No one on the ground was seriously hurt.

In a preliminary report released Monday, investigators confirmed that a close examination of video showed a bird very close to the plane’s right engine intake “during the critical phase of take-off.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 2, 2020

The Canadian Press

Montreal protest against anti-black racism, police impunity turns violent

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

A Montreal anti-racism protest demanding justice for a black Minnesota man who died following a police intervention last week degenerated into clashes between police and some demonstrators on Sunday night.

About three hours after a march that snaked its way through downtown Montreal on Sunday afternoon had ended, Montreal police declared the gathering illegal after they say projectiles were thrown at officers who responded with pepper spray and tear gas.

Tensions flared after the formal rally had concluded and some demonstrators made their way back to the starting point, in the shadow of Montreal police headquarters downtown.

Windows were smashed, fires were set and the situation slid into a game of cat-and-mouse between pockets of protesters and police trying to disperse them.

Demonstrators had gathered to denounce racist violence and police impunity – both in the U.S. and at home in Montreal.

George Floyd died in Minneapolis on Monday after pleading for air while a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck.

His death has sparked nightly protests in major U.S. cities.

The Montreal rally was a solidarity gathering with American anti-racism activists, but organizers say it is also an opportunity to express their own anger at the treatment of racialized people in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada.

Some of the names invoked included names of black men killed during Montreal police interventions in recent years.

“It’s important for everyone to be here today so that we can have a lot of voices to say the George Floyd event is not a singular event,” said Marie-Livia Beauge, one of the event organizers. “It keeps happening and it’s happening here in Montreal so to be here together is to show solidarity and denounce the injustice.”

The gathering drew Montrealers of all stripes and backgrounds, holding posters with slogans. Protesters chanted “Black lives matter” and “I can’t breathe” – what Floyd was caught on video saying.

They took a knee in unison several times in solidarity with the movement.

But when Montreal police called on protesters to disperse, some refused.

Leah Blain, 20, chose to continue demonstrating and was part of a group trying to reach police headquarters when she was met with pepper spray.

“We were just standing here, we were showing our support and this is what happens, the police support a system that’s against us, so if you support them, you’re against us,” she said.

Vincent Mousseau, a social worker and community organizer, called out Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante, who earlier Sunday had condemned “violence, racism and systemic discrimination” in a series of tweets.

Mousseau cautioned against empty words from leaders.

“In fighting this, we need to ensure our movements are not co-opted to stifle our anger with their kind word and simultaneous inaction,” Mousseau said.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizers repeatedly told people to spread out, trying to find a spot where a two-metre distance could be maintained.

Despite a majority of people wearing masks and organizers squirting hand sanitizer, the numbers attending made distancing impossible.

The location adjacent to Montreal police headquarters was packed, with police closely guarding the building that houses their brass.

Dr. Horacio Arruda, Quebec’s director of public health, told Radio-Canada on Sunday evening that he recognized the importance of the cause but urged hand washing and for anyone exhibiting symptoms to let health authorities know they attended the protest.

Around the start of the demonstration, Montreal police took the unusual step of issuing a tweet saying they were dismayed by the death of George Floyd.

“Both the action taken and the inaction of the witnesses present go against the values of our organization,” the force tweeted calling on for a peaceful demonstration.

“We respect the rights and the need of everyone to speak out against this violence and will be by your side to ensure your safety,” the police said.

The Montreal rally followed one in Toronto on Saturday, which remained peaceful.

So too did Sunday’s rally in Vancouver, where thousands gathered outside the city’s art gallery, waving signs and chanting their support of the Black Lives Matter movement and Floyd.

Tristan Miura, who held up a skateboard painted with the words “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” said he hopes Vancouver will reflect on the protesters’ message.

“Vancouver has always been quite liberal and very open about what they feel is wrong in the community,” said Miura. “I think Vancouver, as a whole, is taking this time to reflect on past issues and preventing further issues from occurring.”

Others hoped it would spark a larger reaction in Canada.

“I hope this is just the start,” said Chance Lovett. “I hope this is just the beginning of a larger conversation and a larger movement.”

Vancouver police said there have been no arrests during the event.

‘It’s unsettling:’ Ranchers and feedlots worried about future impact of COVID-19

BILL GRAVELAND, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

CREMONA, Alta. — A cacophony of bellowing cattle makes it hard to hear the other hoof drop, but rancher Bruce Bird knows that it’s coming.

Bird runs a cow-calf operation and had to shout to be heard during annual branding last week on his ranch near Cremona, 80 kilometres northwest of Calgary.

Over a hundred calves were run through a chute and locked onto a table to have ear tags applied and a mark seared onto their sides.

The COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t had a serious effect on Bird yet, but he’s anticipating it will be tougher when the calves are sold in the fall.

“Absolutely, we’re going to get hit eventually,” he said. “There’s usually a big ripple effect prolonged. It’s a long, long gradual time until it can rectify itself.”

“There’s some marketing issues, some commodity issues … that are really slow to hit us. But when it hits us, it hits us extra hard.”

A concern for Bird and neighbour Chelsey Reid, who farms with her husband, Scott, is a backlog of beef at feedlots.

The Cargill plant in High River, Alta., shut down for two weeks due to a COVID-19 outbreak there and is now operating at about 60 per cent capacity. The JBS plant in Brooks, Alta., reduced its operations to just one shift a day until recently. The two meat-packers process 70 per cent of Canada’s beef.

“There’s always what we call the fall run. That’s when there’s always a lot of beef on the market, but we always have the capacity for it, so it’s not that big of a problem,” Reid said.

“If people aren’t able to sell their calves this fall, that’s going to be a real problem.”

Reid said the uncertainty is the most unsettling part.

“Our farms are just sort of carrying on as they always have. Anything that’s going to be negative … is going to be happening come this fall and probably in 2021,” she said.

“A lot of us young farmers have a lot of payments that we’re tied into, so it definitely is worrisome. It’s a lot of money that we definitely rely on.”

Tom Thorlakson said there are animals at his family’s feedlot near Airdrie that were supposed to have been shipped to meat plants in mid-April.

“We have cattle that we wish were gone. We’re not buying anything,” said Thorlakson, vice-president of Thorlakson Feedyards.

There are 14,000 cattle at the feedlot and feed costs are running to about $1 million a month, he said.

“When are we ever going to know when the plants will be up to full capacity? It will be the ever-going threat we’re living with right now.”

Thorlakson said he’s heard the cattle backlog could exist until December. And although his family feedlot will be OK, it won’t be the same for others.

“It pushes it back to the rancher right? If a lot of the guys are not buying, the guys selling their calves will be getting a lot less money for them because there’ll be less demand,” he said.

“There’s going to be a lot of guys in hardship.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 1, 2020

— Follow @BillGraveland on Twitter

Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

More provinces moving to further loosen COVID-19 restrictions

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

OTTAWA — As COVID-19 cases continue to decline in much of the country, some provinces are moving today to loosen more of the restrictions they implemented to slow the spread of the pandemic.

British Columbia is giving parents the option of sending their children back to school on a part-time basis.

For kindergarten to Grade 5, most students will go to school half time, while grades 6 to 12 will attend classes about one day a week. The government has said its goal is for the return of full-time classes in September.

Manitoba is easing a raft of restrictions, including its ban on people visiting loved ones in personal care homes, though safeguards such as screening visitors and maintaining physical distancing will apply.

Community centres, seniors clubs, fitness clubs, dine-in restaurants, bars, bowling alleys, pools, amateur sports and recreation programs can also reopen with limits on customer capacity and rules for physical distancing.

Film productions are being allowed to resume and a ban on non-essential travel to the province’s north is being eased.

In Ontario Drive-in movie theatres and batting cages were allowed to reopen Sunday, and today campers can return to provincial parks, with certain stipulations.

Meanwhile, Prince Edward Island is moving into the third phase of its reopening plan, which allows in-house dining at restaurants as well as the reopening of child-care centres and libraries. Also allowed now are outdoor visits with residents at long-term care homes, certain recreational and sporting activities and gatherings of up to 15 people indoors and 20 outdoors.

In Ottawa this morning, Prime Minister Trudeau will resume his daily briefings on the pandemic after taking the weekend off.

On Sunday Canada’s total number of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases stood at 90,929 — 739 more than the day before — with the vast majority of cases in Quebec and Ontario. Some 48,854 cases were listed as being resolved, while the number of deaths from the illness rose by 222 to 7,295.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, May 29th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on May 29, 2020:

There are 88,512 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 49,702 confirmed (including 4,302 deaths, 15,618 resolved)

_ Ontario: 26,866 confirmed (including 2,189 deaths, 20,673 resolved)

_ Alberta: 6,955 confirmed (including 143 deaths, 6,160 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 2,558 confirmed (including 163 deaths, 2,153 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,055 confirmed (including 59 deaths, 977 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 639 confirmed (including 10 deaths, 568 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 283 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 273 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 255 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 126 confirmed (including 120 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 27 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 88,512 (11 presumptive, 88,501 confirmed including 6,876 deaths, 46,853 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 29, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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