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Canada to study mixing-and-matching of COVID-19 vaccines

NEWS STAFF | posted Thursday, May 20th, 2021

A new Canadian study is set to begin, looking at the effects of “mixing-and-matching” COVID-19 vaccines in adults.

The COVID-19 Immunity Task Force and the Vaccine Surveillance Reference Group will assess the safety and effectiveness of using two different COVID-19 vaccines for the first and second dose, as well as the effects of increasing the interval between doses.

There are currently four COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in Canada — Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, AstraZenca and Johnson & Johnson.

Several provinces have temporarily suspended the use of the AstraZenca vaccine due to rare blood clots in some recipients. That has heightened the interest in whether or not it could be possible to administer a different vaccine to those people as a second shot.

Preliminary results of an ongoing study in the United Kingdom suggest alternating the AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines causes more frequent mild to moderate symptoms, but there are no other safety concerns from mixing those vaccines.

“Studies on mixed COVID-19 vaccine schedules are underway in other countries, including the United Kingdom,” says Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer. “In addition to international data, this Canadian study will help inform Canada’s public health recommendations on the potential to use different combinations of vaccines for the first and second dose, as well as different dosing intervals.”

Up to 1,300 participants will be enrolled in the trials which is set to take place using the Canadian Immunization Research Network’s Clinical Trials Network in Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia. Anyone who is 18 years of age or older and in good health is eligible to participate in the study.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, May 19th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

Health Canada says up to 37 million doses of vaccine could be shipped in May and June, but only 20.3 million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and 1.04 million doses of Moderna are confirmed. The remaining 11.3 million doses of Moderna, and another four million doses of Oxford-AstraZeneca from various sources are still tentative.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

More than 655,000 doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from  the global vaccine sharing alliance known as COVAX, are scheduled to arrive and be distributed to provinces this week, but most provinces have already said they plan to put them on ice in reserve for second doses.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says almost 50 per cent of eligible adults in Canada have received at least one shot of COVID-19 vaccine.

He says by the summer, Canada will have enough vaccines so that every eligible resident will have gotten their first dose, and by September, it will have enough doses for everyone to be fully vaccinated.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization is confirming they believe it is safe and effective to offer the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to adolescents.

Health Canada authorized Pfizer for kids between 12 and 15 years old on May 5, after the company completed a clinical trial which found it was safe and 100 per cent effective at preventing kids in that age group from getting COVID-19.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

All people in the province aged 12 and older are now able to book an appointment for a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is stopping the use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine as a first dose.

The Health Department says the “decision is based on an abundance of caution” due to an observed increase in the rare blood-clotting condition linked to this vaccine.

The department also says it has enough mRNA vaccine to immunize people age 40 and older, and it will reschedule anyone who was to receive AstraZeneca to instead be inoculated with Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna “in a timely manner.”

People aged 35 and older can book appointments for the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines at clinics across the province.

Bookings opened May 17 for vaccine appointments for people 30 to 34 years of age, as the province reports having administered 430,856 doses of COVID-19 vaccine as of Sunday, with 39,235 people having received their second dose.

Prince Edward Island

In Prince Edward Island, residents as young as 16 can book a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

New Brunswick

In New Brunswick, residents 18 and up can book appointments.

Individuals 16 and older who have two or more chronic health conditions are also eligible.

Quebec

In Quebec, all residents 18 and older are able to book a COVID-19 vaccination appointment.

The province’s health minister says Quebecers 12 to 17 years old will be offered a first dose of COVID-19 by the end of June and will be fully vaccinated by the time they return to school in September.

Ontario

All adults in Ontario are eligible to book COVID-19 vaccine appointments as of May 18.

People turning 18 in 2021 can book Pfizer-BioNTech shots.

Appointments for children aged 12 to 17 can be booked starting the week of May 31.

The province aims to see all eligible Ontarians fully vaccinated by the end of September.

The province is distributing shots to regions on a per capita basis, after two weeks sending half of its vaccine supply to hot spots for COVID-19 infections.

Ontario has halted use AstraZeneca for first shots due to an increased risk of a rare blood-clotting syndrome linked to the vaccine. Officials say a second dose plan for AstraZeneca recipients is in the works.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for all people aged 18 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, down to age 12 by May 21 at the latest.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability. People 30-39 can get a shot if they have certain underlying health conditions such as chronic liver failure or severe obesity.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan residents aged 16 and older are now eligible to book their first COVID-19 vaccine appointment.

A school immunization program for those aged 12-18 will be introduced in June, but eligible residents of that age can also be immunized at clinics offering the Pfizer vaccine.

Beginning Tuesday, anyone 85 and older, or anyone who received their first vaccine dose before February 15, is eligible to book their second dose.

Individuals diagnosed with cancer and solid organ transplant recipients will be receiving a letter of eligibility in the mail which will allow them priority access to a second dose.

The province says all Saskatchewan residents over 12 will be eligible for vaccination by May 20.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province.

Alberta

Every Albertan aged 12 and older is now eligible for a vaccine.

As of May 18, more than half of all Albertans over the age of 12 had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health.

Hinshaw has said that people who are immunocompromised can book a second dose three of four weeks after their first shot. All other Albertans are eligible to get their second dose three to four months after the first.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province lowered the minimum age to 30. They are, however, reserving the remaining supply for second doses when people are eligible.

Hinshaw has also said that health officials are looking at studies from the United Kingdom on people first vaccinated with AstraZeneca and then Pfizer. She said there are no safety concerns in mixing the vaccines, but she is waiting to see data on how effective it is. Once that data is available, Hinshaw said the province will decide if they will give people vaccinated with AstraZeneca a chance to get the Pfizer vaccine as a second dose.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians’ clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and clinics.

British Columbia

People who’ve had a first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will have the option of choosing their second shot within a four-month interval in B.C.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says 20,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine are set to expire at the end of June and were reserved for people who may not be able to get an mRNA vaccine, such as the one made by Pfizer-BioNTech.

But she says more information that’s expected by the first week of June from a study in the United Kingdom on the effectiveness of switching vaccines for the second dose will be shared with B.C. residents.

“You will have the option of receiving the second dose of AstraZeneca and we have stock coming in to be able to support that,” she said Monday. “Or you can take the information once we have it and make your own decision about what you want for your second dose.”

Henry says an increase in the supply of vaccines in the coming weeks means everyone can expect to have their second dose moved up.

Details about vaccination of children aged 12 to 17 are expected to be announced later this week.

As of May 18, more than 2.5 million vaccine shots have been given, with 131,837 being second doses.

Nunavut

Chief public health officer Dr. Michael Patterson says Nunavut has placed an order for doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine with the federal government to vaccinate people ages 12 to 17 in the territory.

The Moderna vaccine is currently the only one available in Nunavut.

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from Southern Canada.

The territory had expected to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is now offering vaccinations against COVID-19 to young people between 12 and 17.

The territory, which has only been using the Moderna vaccine, recently exchanged some of that for doses of the Pfizer product, which Health Canada has now approved for anyone as young as 12.

Yukon

The territory will start vaccinating children aged 12 to 17 on May 31.

The government says in a statement that clinics in most communities will be held in schools, while those in Whitehorse can get their shot at the Coast High Country Inn Convention Centre. The children will be getting the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

The territory says because of limited supply and stricter handling requirements, the vaccine will only be available for a short time.

It says second doses for those 12 to 17 will start on June 23 and medical travel will be supported for youth who aren’t able to make the clinic date in their community.

The government says more than 75 per cent of all eligible adults have now received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

That amounts to 26,242 adults who have received their first dose, while the territory says 23,236 have received their second dose.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 18, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Up to 2,500 fans allowed at Montreal’s Bell Centre for potential Leafs-Habs Game 6

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, May 19th, 2021

A limited number of fans will be permitted in the Bell Centre to watch a May 29 playoff game between the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs, should the series last that long.

The Quebec government announced Tuesday that indoor venues will be able to start hosting up to 2,500 patrons starting May 28 and that the provincial curfew will be lifted the same day.

“We are delighted with the government’s decision regarding shows and events,” France Margaret Belanger, the Canadiens’ executive vice-president and chief commercial officer, said in a statement.

“Although the number of spectators remains limited, we applaud this decision which allows us to foresee an eventual return to normality.”

Belanger said 2,500 people is about 12 per cent of the Bell Centre’s capacity.

“We really missed our fans and spectators and we can’t wait to host them again. And we will be ready,” she said.

The announcement of Quebec’s reopening plan came mere hours after Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, said allowing fans into games is not under “serious consideration” at this point in the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I would say if you look at that timing and what’s the schedule for the NHL playoffs, which is taking place right now and into the summer months, it’s not really something that’s under serious consideration in terms of fans in the stands, just based on where we are with our vaccination campaign at this point,” Njoo said in Ottawa.


RELATED: Njoo doesn’t expect fans to be allowed into Canadian arenas for NHL playoffs


All of the American games so far in the playoffs have had fans, with a high of 12,000 for a Carolina Hurricanes home contest against the Nashville Predators on Monday night.

The NHL has had Canadian teams play exclusively in the country this year with no fans at any games. The Edmonton Oilers open the North Division playoffs against the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday, while the Maple Leafs and Canadiens start their best-of-seven series Thursday in Toronto.

The winners square off in the second round before the Canadian survivor faces one of the three remaining American teams in the third round.

While Njoo did not see fans in attendance at Canadian playoff games, he said discussions are ongoing to determine if there can be cross-border travel in the third round and/or the Stanley Cup final.

“The live issue of course right now is what happens when we do get to the final four,” Njoo said.

Njoo said the federal government has had discussions with the provinces to figure out what might be possible.

The issue for the NHL is the 14-day quarantine for those coming in from outside Canada, which would be impossible during a best-of-seven series when one team hosts Games 1, 2, 5 and 7 and the other hosts Games 3, 4 and 6.

If the league and the country can’t come to an agreement on a modified quarantine, the North Division winner could relocate to the U.S. after the second round.

Many Canadian professional teams in other sports with regular cross-border travel have played home games in the U.S. during the pandemic.

Jets coach Paul Maurice said Monday the fans were very noticeable during the American playoff games.

“I really do believe that the only possible silver lining in all of this is the people and the players have just a great appreciation for just how great fans are and the experience for the players, especially,” Maurice said.

“I think it makes a big, big difference.”

The CFL’s Montreal Alouettes said they were encouraged by Tuesday’s announcement. The CFL is hoping to return to action in 20201 after having its 2020 season wiped out by the pandemic.

“Since the presence of a certain number of fans in the stands is essential for the Alouettes to return to play, today’s announcements is a step in the right direction considering that the team’s first home game (in Montreal) would most likely take place in September,” the Alouettes said in a statement.

“It goes without saying that the organization is also extremely happy that youngsters will be able to practice their favourite team sport once again.”

Major League Soccer’s Montreal Impact (now CF Montreal) was the first Canadian professional sports team to have fans during the pandemic when 250 fans attended an Aug. 25 game against Vancouver.

John Gomery, judge who led inquiry exposing Quebec sponsorship scandal, dead at 88

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, May 19th, 2021

MONTREAL — John Gomery, the judge who led a public inquiry that helped sink a federal government, has died at age 88.

His daughter confirmed his death to The Canadian Press today.

Gomery was a Quebec Superior Court justice when he was named to head an inquiry into the federal sponsorship scandal in 2004.

The revelations of kickbacks and illegal fundraising ultimately helped lead to the defeat of the once-dominant Liberal government.

Gomery studied law at McGill University and worked in private practice in Montreal before being named a judge in 1982.

He retired to his farm southwest of Montreal after leaving the bench in 2007, but he remained active in public life.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 19, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Tuesday, May 18, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, May 18th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Tuesday May 18, 2021.

There are 1,334,104 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 1,334,104 confirmed cases (67,639 active, 1,241,482 resolved, 24,983 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 4,586 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 177.97 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 39,905 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 5,701.

There were 35 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 301 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 43. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 65.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 33,592,273 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,203 confirmed cases (97 active, 1,100 resolved, six deaths).

There were 10 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 18.58 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 62 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is nine.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 256,309 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 192 confirmed cases (nine active, 183 resolved, zero deaths).

There was one new case Monday. The rate of active cases is 5.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 154,580 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 4,827 confirmed cases (1,434 active, 3,320 resolved, 73 deaths).

There were 91 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 146.42 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 793 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 113.

There was one new reported death Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.03 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 7.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 725,813 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 2,073 confirmed cases (119 active, 1,913 resolved, 41 deaths).

There were 10 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 15.23 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 60 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is nine.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 5.25 per 100,000 people.

There have been 323,946 tests completed.

Quebec: 363,847 confirmed cases (7,011 active, 345,794 resolved, 11,042 deaths).

There were 551 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 81.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,051 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 722.

There were eight new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 49 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is seven. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 128.78 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,862,183 tests completed.

Ontario: 511,486 confirmed cases (25,869 active, 477,128 resolved, 8,489 deaths).

There were 2,170 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 175.57 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16,467 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,352.

There were four new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 162 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 23. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.16 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 57.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,619,412 tests completed.

Manitoba: 45,579 confirmed cases (4,568 active, 40,000 resolved, 1,011 deaths).

There were 430 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 331.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,129 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 447.

There was one new reported death Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 14 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.15 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 73.3 per 100,000 people.

There have been 747,968 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 44,709 confirmed cases (1,965 active, 42,225 resolved, 519 deaths).

There were 178 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 166.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,414 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 202.

There were two new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.03 per 100,000 people.

There have been 820,209 tests completed.

Alberta: 219,682 confirmed cases (21,288 active, 196,246 resolved, 2,148 deaths).

There were 721 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 481.42 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,295 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,328.

There were five new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 31 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 48.58 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,404,789 tests completed.

British Columbia: 139,664 confirmed cases (5,175 active, 132,841 resolved, 1,648 deaths).

There were 424 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 100.53 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,556 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 508.

There were 14 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 26 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 32.01 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,631,197 tests completed.

Yukon: 84 confirmed cases (one active, 81 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 2.38 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,129 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 121 confirmed cases (38 active, 83 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 84.14 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 22,405 tests completed.

Nunavut: 624 confirmed cases (65 active, 555 resolved, four deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 165.17 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 52 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is seven.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,257 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 18, 2021.

The Canadian Press

What happened to the wage subsidies the government gave to businesses?

THE BIG STORY | posted Tuesday, May 18th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, thousands of small businesses used the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy to keep afloat and avoid laying off their staff. But they weren’t the only type of business to qualify for and receive the CEWS. Among some of the companies that took government money are companies that bounced back after a bad month, companies who fared well during the pandemic and publicly-traded companies who were even able to payout dividends to shareholders in the same year they accessed this emergency funding.

All these companies qualified, so they can’t be blamed for taking the funds. Should the policy have been clearer? Should the amounts and recipients be public? What could have been done to make this program more targeted and efficient?

GUEST: Patrick Brethour, Tax and Fiscal Policy Reporter, The Globe and Mail

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify.

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on May 16, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 17th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 10:30 p.m. ET on Sunday May 16, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 317,066 new vaccinations administered for a total of 18,415,536 doses given. Nationwide, 1,410,762 people or 3.7 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 48,590.732 per 100,000.

There were 21,060 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 20,376,264 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 90.38 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 33,429 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 235,651 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 450.033 per 1,000. In the province, 1.89 per cent (9,881) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 279,010 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 53 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.46 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 8,000 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 67,758 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 427.148 per 1,000. In the province, 7.20 per cent (11,429) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 84,915 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 54 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 79.8 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 58,592 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 415,570 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 425.833 per 1,000. In the province, 3.98 per cent (38,830) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were 21,060 new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 519,550 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 53 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 79.99 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 53,192 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 355,454 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 455.687 per 1,000. In the province, 4.21 per cent (32,838) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 415,935 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 53 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.46 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 92,520 new vaccinations administered for a total of 4,323,040 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 505.226 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 4,578,079 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 54 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 94.43 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 139,583 new vaccinations administered for a total of 7,064,815 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 480.957 per 1,000. In the province, 2.92 per cent (429,636) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 7,843,825 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 53 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 90.07 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 11,022 new vaccinations administered for a total of 649,264 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 471.505 per 1,000. In the province, 5.89 per cent (81,151) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 759,870 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 55 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.44 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 18,995 new vaccinations administered for a total of 590,952 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 501.166 per 1,000. In the province, 4.12 per cent (48,609) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 637,115 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 54 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 92.75 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 45,719 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,189,999 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 497.496 per 1,000. In the province, 7.46 per cent (328,414) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 2,355,255 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 54 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 92.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,393,265 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 466.38 per 1,000. In the province, 2.43 per cent (124,880) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 2,740,590 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 53 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 87.33 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 50,652 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,213.774 per 1,000. In the territory, 56.73 per cent (23,673) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 57,020 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 140 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 88.83 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 49,811 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,103.992 per 1,000. In the territory, 49.87 per cent (22,501) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 60,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 130 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 83.02 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 29,305 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 756.727 per 1,000. In the territory, 33.26 per cent (12,879) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 45,100 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 64.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 16, 2021.

The Canadian Press

 

Canada to get 4.5M vaccine doses as questions swirl around immunization effort

LEE BERTHIAUME, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 17th, 2021

Canada is set to receive a large infusion of COVID-19 vaccines this week, even as questions swirl around how the immunization drive will be affected by the sudden departure of the man tasked with overseeing it.

The federal government says it expects around 4.5 million doses to arrive this week thanks to planned deliveries from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

Pfizer and BioNTech had been scheduled to deliver around 2 million doses this week as their vaccines continue to flow into Canada on a regular basis after early hiccups in February and March.

But the federal government says the two companies will ship an additional 1.4 million shots, which were originally slated to land next week but are now expected to arrive before the upcoming holiday weekend.

The large influx comes as the Liberal government faces questions about who will now lead the vaccination campaign after Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin was sidelined suddenly on Friday and reassigned from his role presiding over the national inoculation effort.

The Department of National Defence has said Fortin is under military investigation, but otherwise refused to provide any details. The government, meanwhile, has yet to name a replacement.

There are also ongoing questions about the government’s plans for the Oxford-AstraZeneca or Johnson and Johnson vaccines.

More than 655,000 shots of AstraZeneca arrived through the global vaccine-sharing initiative known as COVAX on Thursday, but most provinces have temporarily paused their use for first doses amid supply issues and the potential risk of rare blood clots.

As a result, the federal government has yet to distribute those shots to the provinces, though Ottawa says it expects to still receive another 1 million doses by the end of June.

About 2.16 million Canadians had received one dose of AstraZeneca as of May 8, and those additional doses could be used to give those people a second jab.

Health Canada also continues to review the quality of 300,000 Johnson and Johnson shots that were delivered last month, but have yet to be distributed.

The doses have been held back over concerns of possible tainting at a Baltimore production facility.

Health Canada chief medical adviser Dr. Supriya Sharma told CTV on Sunday that it could be weeks before the review is complete.

A Mountie has been on paid leave for 16 years but he’s not alone

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, May 17th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, it began with allegations of sexual misconduct, but it went beyond that into a bureaucratic tangle that left the alleged victim’s parents without justice, the RCMP spending hundreds of thousands to keep a constable on leave and an embarrassing look into an organization that badly needs to fix its policies.

What went wrong in the case of Const. Justin Harris? And how systemic are the problems in the RCMP discipline process?

GUEST: Jane Gerster, investigative journalist

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify.

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

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