1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Latest Posts

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, July 13

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jul 13th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on July 13, 2020:

There are 107,589 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 56,521 confirmed (including 5,627 deaths, 25,862 resolved)

_ Ontario: 36,723 confirmed (including 2,719 deaths, 32,534 resolved)

_ Alberta: 8,596 confirmed (including 160 deaths, 7,844 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 3,053 confirmed (including 187 deaths, 2,679 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,066 confirmed (including 63 deaths, 1,000 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 815 confirmed (including 15 deaths, 757 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 314 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 314 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 262 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 258 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 166 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 163 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 33 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 107,589 (11 presumptive, 107,578 confirmed including 8,783 deaths, 71,467 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 13, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Quebec police still looking for father, two days after missing girls found dead

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jul 13th, 2020

ST-APOLLINAIRE, Que. — Quebec provincial police continued to search through the night for the father of two girls whose bodies were found Saturday in a small town southwest of Quebec City.

The bodies of Norah and Romy Carpentier, aged 11 and 6, were located in a wooded area in the community of St-Apollinaire, Que.

The girls had last been seen on Wednesday and became the subject of an Amber Alert the next day.

On Sunday, the manhunt for their father, Martin Carpentier, 44, had authorities tightening the search in a thickly wooded area near where the young sisters from Levis, Que. were found.THE CANADIAN PRESS

Residents had helped with the searches until Saturday, but police asked people to stay away from the area Sunday to let officers work.

The attention of the entire province has been on the case, especially in the town of just over 6,000 people where it’s playing out.

Police have said the girls and their father were believed to have been in a car crash on Highway 20 in St-Apollinaire on Wednesday evening.

Investigators said the car was heading east when it skidded into the median, flipped over and landed on the shoulder on the opposite side of the highway.

But police did not find any occupants inside the car when they arrived.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 13, 2020.

Three found dead after downtown motel fire in Prince George, B.C.

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Jul 9th, 2020

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. — The RCMP say the bodies of three people have been found at the scene of a motel fire in downtown Prince George, B.C.

Cpl. Craig Douglass says emergency services were called to the Econo Lodge City Centre Inn on Victoria Street around 9 a.m. Wednesday.

He says fire crews tackled the blaze, which engulfed a portion of the building, while police assisted with staff and guests who evacuated the structure.

At about 12:30 p.m., Douglass says personnel clearing the building found the three bodies, but he did not have details about their identities.

Douglass says an investigation is underway and determining the cause of the fire will take some time.

The RCMP are also working to determine if anyone is missing, but Douglass says with so many people fleeing the area and others gathering to observe the blaze, that has been difficult.

“You can imagine a scene like this is chaos,” he says.

The BC Coroners Services says it has begun a fact-finding investigation, but it is in its early stages and no other information can be released at this time.

“We are investigating to determine who died, and to investigate how, where, when and by what means,” spokesman Andy Watson says.

— By Amy Smart in Vancouver.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 8, 2020.

 

The Canadian Press

Raptors VanVleet knows hardship small businesses face during pandemic

Lindsay Dunn | posted Thursday, Jul 9th, 2020

The Toronto Raptors are on their way to Orlando Thursday but fan-favorite Fred VanVleet has Canada in his heart and on his mind. He ventured into the small business world a few years ago as he is one of many of the Raptors who have their own clothing line. Even though he isn’t in Toronto he is encouraging people to support small businesses in their community during the pandemic.

“I own my own small business so it definitely hits home for me,” VanVleet told CityNews from Florida. “I know what it takes to run a small business. I know the challenges that come with that, the hustle and drive that you have to have to keep up. It’s so important for me to spend, and to shop small. It’s something that I just live every day, it’s is something I believe in.”

VanVleet recently teamed up with American Express for their Shop Small campaign and even though he hasn’t been in Toronto in a few months, he wants to make sure the city is taking care of each other.

“That’s one of the things I love about Toronto’s is the small businesses and you know, it just gives the city a culture and a vibe. Because of the year that we’ve had 2020 hasn’t been kind to anybody. I’ve seen personally, how Canada and especially Toronto, come together, we saw last year when we won.”

“One of the most incredible moments of my life was that parade. And just the people celebrating so if I can try to get some of that energy going with the people and encourage people to shop small and to spend the money with businesses that they love. They can recirculate those funds and get the economy going and help people that are in need and these business owners, you know, have probably taken a big hit this year.”

There is one place, in particular, he has been missing in Toronto.

“I really miss my barber right now,” VanVleet said with a laugh. “Shout out to my barber Brian at Throne Barbershop, I’ve been missing him since I haven’t been able to be in Toronto for almost four months now.”

Before flying to Florida, the 26-year-old was in self-quarantine with his girlfriend and their two kids. He admits it was the longest he has ever been at home since he was a kid.

“It was nice. I was able to be there all day every day, every second. I got to help with the baths and the lunches and putting them to bed. We got a lot closer over that time which made it even hard to leave.”

The Raptors were in the Fort-Meyers – Naples, Florida area for the last two weeks before immersing themselves in the NBA Bubble in Orlando, where they hope to defend their title. During that time his teammate Kyle Lowry didn’t speak to the media and no photos were taken of the veteran NBA All-Star.

“No comment, no comment, I can’t comment on his whereabouts,” VanVleet joked. “He’s here, no worries. Raptors fans will be happy when they see him lace-up with us.”

The Raptors will host the Los Angeles Lakers when their season resumes in Orlando on August 1st.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Thursday, July 9

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Jul 9th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 p.m. ET on July 9, 2020:

There are 106,434 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 56,079 confirmed (including 5,603 deaths, 25,534 resolved)

_ Ontario: 36,178 confirmed (including 2,700 deaths, 31,805 resolved)

_ Alberta: 8,482 confirmed (including 158 deaths, 7,716 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 3,008 confirmed (including 186 deaths, 2,645 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,066 confirmed (including 63 deaths, 998 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 808 confirmed (including 15 deaths, 746 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 314 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 312 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 258 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 165 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 162 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 32 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 1 presumptive

_ Total: 106,434 (12 presumptive, 106,422 confirmed including 8,737 deaths, 70,232 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Montreal police to announce street checks policy after systemic bias report

The Canadian Press | posted Wednesday, Jul 8th, 2020

Montreal police are to announce a new policy on street checks today, months after a damning independent report found evidence of systemic bias linked to race in who they decide to stop.

Last October, Police chief Sylvain Caron said he was humbled and alarmed by the numbers but stressed that it was a reflection of a lack of policy.

The authors crunched three years worth of police data to come up with their conclusions, which they stopped short of conclusively describing as racial profiling.

Street checks involve officers stopping a person and recording their information regardless of whether an offence has been committed.

The report last fall suggested that people from certain racialized groups were much more likely than others to be stopped by police.

It found that Indigenous women were 11 times more likely to be questioned than their white counterparts; that Black and Indigenous Montrealers were between four and five times more likely to be subjected to stops while those of Arab descent were twice as likely to be stopped.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 8, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Montreal police to announce street checks policy after systemic bias report

Talia Knezic | posted Wednesday, Jul 8th, 2020

Montreal police are to announce a new policy on street checks today, months after a damning independent report found evidence of systemic bias linked to race in who they decide to stop.

Last October, Police chief Sylvain Caron said he was humbled and alarmed by the numbers but stressed that it was a reflection of a lack of policy.

The authors crunched three years worth of police data to come up with their conclusions, which they stopped short of conclusively describing as racial profiling.

Street checks involve officers stopping a person and recording their information regardless of whether an offence has been committed.

The report last fall suggested that people from certain racialized groups were much more likely than others to be stopped by police.

It found that Indigenous women were 11 times more likely to be questioned than their white counterparts; that Black and Indigenous Montrealers were between four and five times more likely to be subjected to stops while those of Arab descent were twice as likely to be stopped.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 8, 2020.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, July 8

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jul 8th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on July 8, 2020:

There are 106,167 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 55,997 confirmed (including 5,590 deaths, 25,458 resolved)

_ Ontario: 36,060 confirmed (including 2,691 deaths, 31,603 resolved)

_ Alberta: 8,436 confirmed (including 157 deaths, 7,659 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 2,990 confirmed (including 183 deaths, 2,645 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,065 confirmed (including 63 deaths, 998 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 806 confirmed (including 15 deaths, 737 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 314 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 307 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 258 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 165 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 162 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 32 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 1 presumptive

_ Total: 106,167 (12 presumptive, 106,155 confirmed including 8,711 deaths, 69,883 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 8, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Ban federal use of facial-recognition tools, groups urge Trudeau government

JIM BRONSKILL , THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Jul 8th, 2020

OTTAWA — Dozens of groups and individuals working to protect privacy, human rights and civil liberties want the Trudeau government to ban the use of facial-recognition surveillance by federal law-enforcement and intelligence agencies.

In an open letter to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, they call the technology “highly problematic,” given its lack of accuracy and invasive nature, and say it poses a threat to Canadians’ fundamental rights.

They tell the minister that in the absence of meaningful policy or regulation governing facial recognition, it cannot be considered safe for use in Canada.

The letter is signed by Tim McSorley, national co-ordinator of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, and Laura Tribe, executive director of Open Media, who are spearheading the campaign.

It is endorsed by 29 other prominent groups including Amnesty International Canada, the Canadian Federation of Students, the Canadian Muslim Lawyers Association and Privacy International, as well as 46 academics, researchers, lawyers and other civil society members.

The letter also calls on the government to initiate a meaningful, public consultation on all aspects of facial-recognition technology in Canada and to establish clear, transparent policies and laws regulating its use, including reforms to federal privacy law.

The letter comes as concerns mount over police killing and mistreatment of Black and Indigenous people, prompting widespread discussion about curbing the powers and resources of law-enforcement agencies.

“At a time like this, the public should be certain of the fact that their rights and freedoms are protected,” the letter says.

The federal privacy commissioner said this week that U.S. firm Clearview AI will stop offering its facial-recognition services in Canada in response to an investigation by the commissioner and three provincial counterparts.

Clearview AI’s technology worries many privacy advocates because it apparently allows for the collection of huge numbers of images from various sources with the aim of helping police forces, financial institutions and other clients identify individuals.

Clearview’s retreat includes an indefinite suspension of the company’s contract with the RCMP, its last remaining client in Canada.

Federal officials have also used photo-matching technology to pinpoint people — all wanted on immigration warrants — who used false identities to apply for travel documents.

But the letter to Blair says inadequate regulation of facial recognition and a lack of information means it is impossible to know which police forces and intelligence agencies are using the tool, and to what ends, including during protests.

It cites studies that have found the technology to be inaccurate and especially prone to misidentifying the faces of women and people with darker skin.

“These errors can lead already marginalized communities to be even more likely to face profiling, harassment and violations of their fundamental rights,” the letter says.

This is particularly concerning given the technology’s use in situations where biases are common, including when individuals are travelling and crossing borders as well as in the context of criminal investigations, and national security and anti-terrorism operations, it says.

“If, as federal officials have said, the Canadian government is serious about ending racial disparities in policing, banning facial recognition surveillance is a clear first step.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 8, 2020.

Jim Bronskill , The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Tuesday, July 7

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jul 7th, 2020

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on July 7, 2020:

There are 105,935 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 55,937 confirmed (including 5,577 deaths, 25,378 resolved)

_ Ontario: 35,948 confirmed (including 2,689 deaths, 31,426 resolved)THE CANADIAN PRESS

_ Alberta: 8,389 confirmed (including 155 deaths, 7,627 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 2,978 confirmed (including 183 deaths, 2,629 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,065 confirmed (including 63 deaths, 998 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 805 confirmed (including 14 deaths, 732 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 314 confirmed (including 7 deaths, 304 resolved), 11 presumptive

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 261 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 258 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 165 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 162 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 32 confirmed (including 27 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Yukon: 11 confirmed (including 11 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases, 1 presumptive

_ Total: 105,935 (12 presumptive, 105,923 confirmed including 8,693 deaths, 69,570 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 7, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Page 2 of 2412345...1020...Last »