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‘He loved Nova Scotia.’ Former premier Donald Cameron dead at 74

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, May 3rd, 2021

HALIFAX — The leader of Nova Scotia’s Progressive Conservative party has issued a statement saying Donald Cameron, the province’s 22nd premier, has died.

Tory Leader Tim Houston described Cameron as a mentor with incredible integrity.

Cameron, who was 74, served as premier from February 1991 to May 1993.

Houston says Cameron’s government introduced pioneering human rights legislation that called for equal rights for gay and lesbian people.

Cameron retired from politics the night his party was defeated in a general election by the Liberals, led by John Savage.

In June 1993, then prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Cameron to serve as consul general in Boston.

“He loved Nova Scotia and during his time in public and private life, Donnie was a man of incredible integrity.” Houston said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 3, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Friday, April 30, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 30th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Friday, April 30, 2021.

There are 1,211,083 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 1,211,083 confirmed cases (83,452 active, 1,103,462 resolved, 24,169 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 8,348 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 219.58 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 55,241 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,892.

There were 57 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 347 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 50. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.59 per 100,000 people.

There have been 31,325,175 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,068 confirmed cases (31 active, 1,031 resolved, six deaths).

There were two new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 5.94 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 241,615 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 179 confirmed cases (11 active, 168 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 6.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 141,950 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 2,360 confirmed cases (548 active, 1,745 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 70 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 55.96 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 466 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 67.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 538,842 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,900 confirmed cases (119 active, 1,745 resolved, 36 deaths).

There were 10 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 15.23 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 77 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 11.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 296,955 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 348,732 confirmed cases (9,954 active, 327,865 resolved, 10,913 deaths).

There were 1,042 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 116.09 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,087 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,012.

There were 10 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 68 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 127.27 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,212,465 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 459,477 confirmed cases (38,438 active, 413,010 resolved, 8,029 deaths).

There were 3,871 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 260.88 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 26,672 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,810.

There were 41 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 200 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 29. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.49 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,844,691 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 38,439 confirmed cases (2,263 active, 35,203 resolved, 973 deaths).

There were 230 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 164.07 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,551 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 222.

There were two new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 11 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 672,935 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 40,824 confirmed cases (2,408 active, 37,929 resolved, 487 deaths).

There were 210 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 204.3 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,677 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 240.

There was one new reported death Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 41.32 per 100,000 people.

There have been 760,974 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 188,727 confirmed cases (21,385 active, 165,267 resolved, 2,075 deaths).

There were 2,048 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 483.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,640 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,663.

There were two new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 21 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,106,488 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 128,742 confirmed cases (8,228 active, 118,937 resolved, 1,577 deaths).

There were 853 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 159.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,985 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 855.

There was one new reported death Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 27 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,469,265 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 81 confirmed cases (zero active, 79 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.34 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,928 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 51 confirmed cases (six active, 45 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 13.29 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 18,264 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 490 confirmed cases (61 active, 425 resolved, four deaths).

There were 12 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 155.01 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 58 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is eight.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,727 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 30, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 30th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

Provinces have yet to move the threshold quite that low, however.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Residents who are between the ages of 55 to 64 have access to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

People 65 and older, Indigenous adults, people considered “clinically extremely vulnerable” and rotational workers, truck drivers and flight crew have access to the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Nova Scotia

Residents as young as 55 can book an appointment for a Pfizer of Moderna vaccine.

The province continues to offer the AstraZeneca vaccine to people aged 55-64.

Prince Edward Island

Beginning April 26, people in the province between the ages of 40 and 59 can start booking appointments for a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

New Brunswick

People as young as 60 can begin booking vaccination appointments.

Individuals 40 years old and older with three or more select chronic health conditions are also eligible.

Officials said the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will be available to people aged 40 to 54 by April 30.

Quebec

All adult Quebecers will be able to make a vaccination appointment by mid-May and receive a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of June, Health Minister Christian Dube has said.

He said Quebecers aged 50 to 59 can begin booking appointments on April 30.

Over the following two weeks, appointments will rapidly open to Quebecers in descending order of age — dropping by five years every two or three days — until May 14, when they will be available to people aged 18 to 24.

Quebec has also expanded AstraZeneca availability to people as young as 45. Pregnant women could begin booking vaccine appointments April 28.

Ontario

The province will send half its vaccine supply for the first two weeks of May to 114 postal codes identified as hot spots, an increase from the 25 per cent allocation those areas currently get.

The move follows a recommendation from the province’s science advisers to allocate shots based on transmission rate rather than age group to reduce hospitalizations and deaths due to COVID-19.

The government said it will return to a per capita distribution for vaccines on the week of May 17.

Ontario is also working to lower age eligibility for the vaccine throughout May, saying those 50 and older can book shots at mass vaccination clinics starting next week. If supply holds, the province expects to make those 18 and older eligible for a shot at mass sites provincewide on the week of May 24.

In hot spots, the province said those 18 and older will be able to book vaccines at mass sites starting Monday.

Vaccine eligibility will also open Monday to those with high-risk health conditions, such as obesity, developmental disabilities and treatments requiring immunosuppression. A group of employees who cannot work from home − including food manufacturing workers and foster care workers − also become eligible.

Manitoba

The province is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for First Nations people aged 30 and up and others aged 50 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability.

All front-line police officers,  firefighters and health care workers, regardless of age, qualify as well.

The province is also vaccinating all adults in high-risk areas.

Anyone over 18 who lives or works in the northern health region can get a vaccine.

Any adult who lives in other high-risk areas, including downtown Brandon and much of central Winnipeg, can get a shot as well. Adults who don’t live in those neighbourhoods but who work there in certain jobs that deal with the public can also get vaccinated. Those jobs include teachers, grocery store workers, food-processing staff and restaurant employees.

Roughly 35 per cent of Manitoba’s adult population has had at least one vaccine dose.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority opens up bookings Friday for residents 40 and older. The minimum age for people living in the Far North is 30.

All workers identified as priority are also eligible for shots starting Friday. Additional workers include police, firefighters, public-health inspectors, teachers and educational staff working with students.

The province previously expanded the vaccine delivery plan for people in more vulnerable groups to include all pregnant women and 16- and 17-year-olds who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Saskatchewan also dropped the age at which people can receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province.

Alberta

Another group of 650,000 Albertans will be eligible to book appointments starting Friday.

The final two groups in Phase 2 includes vulnerable Albertans and those who support them, workers at locations with potential for large outbreaks, Albertans aged 50 and older, and all First Nations, Inuit and Metis people aged 35 and older.

It will also include front-line police officers and provincial sheriffs who interact with residents at shelters, correctional facilities and remand centres, border security staff and firefighters.

Albertans born in 2009 or earlier with high-risk underlying health conditions are eligible for shots.

Health-care workers can still book appointments: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, their office staff, lab workers, practicum students in clinical areas, as well as health workers on First Nations reserves and Metis settlements.

Previously, shots have been available to front-line health workers, staff and residents in supportive living facilities.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province has lowered the minimum age to 40 from 55. For those living in the hot spots of Banff and Lake Louise as well as the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, the age for AstraZeneca is 30.

The Moderna vaccine is also available to Indigenous people in Wood Buffalo as young as 30.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project, which could be expanded in May.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and health clinics.

Alberta has said it is extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months. But some cancer patients are able to book a second dose 21 to 28 days after their first.

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans 18 and over a first dose by the end of June.

British Columbia

The province has lowered the eligibility age for people to register for COVID-19 vaccinations.

The Ministry of Health says all adults over the age of 18 are now eligible to register for vaccines through the province’s Get Vaccinated program.

Once registered, users receive a confirmation code. They then wait for an email, text or call telling them they’re eligible and can book their vaccine appointment using that code.

Health authorities are also targeting so-called hot spot communities that have been hardest hit by COVID-19 with dedicated clinics, which the provincial government says are using its “limited” supply of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

B.C. has lowered the age for those eligible to receive the AstraZeneca shot to 30, starting with those in `hot spot’ communities and adding appointments at pharmacies as supplies improve.

Firefighters, police and paramedics, meanwhile, are being vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines alongside staff at schools and childcare centres.

The province says more than 1.7 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines have been administered, with more than 90,000 of those being a second shot.

Nunavut

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from Southern Canada.

The territory expects to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is also providing vaccine to those 18 and older and expects to finish its rollout by the end of April.

It is similarly offering shots to rotational workers and mine employees coming from Southern Canada.

Yukon

There have been almost 48,000 doses of Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon, 25,731 of them first doses and 22, 032 of them second shots.

More than 70 per cent of Yukon residents have received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Health officials say that means they can reduce the hours of operation at the Whitehorse vaccine clinic.

A statement from the territory says at the peak of the process, hundreds of people are day were coming into the Whitehorse clinic.

Deputy health minister Stephen Samis says they’ll scale down operations and focus some efforts on other vaccinations, including pre-kindergarten and routine childhood vaccines.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 30, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Early estimate from Statistics Canada shows economic growth slowed in Q1

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 30th, 2021

Statistics Canada estimates the economy grew at an annualized rate of 6.5 per cent in the first quarter of the year.

The preliminary estimate for the first three months of the year compares with growth at an annualized rate of 9.6 per cent over the last three months of 2020.

Statistics Canada says the economy grew 0.4 per cent in February and estimated growth of 0.9 per cent for March.

Service industries that have been hard-hit through the course of the COVID-19 pandemic showed a small gain in February, while goods-producing industries had a small contraction for the first time since last April.

With the gain in February, overall economic activity was about two per cent below the levels seen pre-pandemic in February 2020.

Taking into account the preliminary numbers for March, Statistics Canada estimates the economy last month was roughly one per cent below pre-pandemic levels.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Apr 29th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

Provinces have yet to move the threshold quite that low, however.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Residents who are between the ages of 55 to 64 have access to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

People 65 and older, Indigenous adults, people considered “clinically extremely vulnerable” and rotational workers, truck drivers and flight crew have access to the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Nova Scotia

Residents as young as 55 can book an appointment for a Pfizer of Moderna vaccine.

The province continues to offer the AstraZeneca vaccine to people aged 55-64.

Prince Edward Island

Beginning April 26, people in the province between the ages of 40 and 59 can start booking appointments for a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

New Brunswick

People as young as 60 can begin booking vaccination appointments.

Individuals 40 years old and older with three or more select chronic health conditions are also eligible.

Quebec

The province has expanded its vaccination rollout to people with chronic illnesses who don’t require regular hospital care, as well as to those with intellectual or physical disabilities.

Quebec expanded AstraZeneca availability to people as young as 45.

Pregnant women can begin booking vaccine appointments April 28.

Ontario

Ontario has said everyone aged 60 and older is eligible to receive a vaccine, though some local public health units have lowered the threshold on their own.

The province has also expanded eligibility for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, saying those 40 and older can start receiving the shot. Shots are available through pharmacies and primary care providers.

People aged 45 and older living in more than 100 neighbourhoods deemed at high risk for COVID-19 can book vaccines at mass immunization clinics starting Tuesday.

The government says child-care workers employed in a licensed child-care setting will be able to book on Thursday, and those in unlicensed settings can set up appointments in the coming weeks.

Ontario, meantime, has doubled the number of pharmacies involved in the provincial vaccine effort.

Some 1,400 pharmacies in COVID-19 hot spots are now offering the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The province says it hopes to add another 100 pharmacies to the vaccine effort by the end of the month.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for First Nations people aged 30 and up and others aged 50 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability.

All front-line police officers, firefighters and health-care workers, regardless of age, qualify as well.

The province is also vaccinating all adults in high-risk areas. Anyone over 18 who lives or works in the northern health region can get a vaccine, as can any adult who lives or works in a public setting in six Winnipeg neighbourhoods and downtown Brandon.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority is currently booking vaccinations for residents 42 and older, however the age eligibility is expected to be lowered to 40 starting Friday. The minimum age for people living in the Far North is 30.

All workers identified as priority are also eligible for shots starting Friday. Additional workers include police, firefighters, public-health inspectors, teachers and educational staff working with students.

The province previously expanded the vaccine delivery plan for people in more vulnerable groups to include all pregnant women and 16- and 17-year-olds who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Saskatchewan also dropped the age at which people can receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province.

Alberta

Albertans born in 2009 or earlier with high-risk underlying health conditions are eligible for shots.

The next phase of health-care workers can also book appointments: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, their office staff, lab workers, practicum students in clinical areas, as well as health workers on First Nations reserves and Metis settlements.

Previously, shots have been available to front-line health workers, staff and residents in supportive living facilities, Albertans born in 1956 or earlier and First Nations, Inuit and Metis people born in 1971 or earlier.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province has lowered the minimum age to 40 from 55. For those living in the hot spots of Banff and Lake Louise as well as the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, the age for AstraZeneca is 30.

The Moderna vaccine is also available to Indigenous people in Wood Buffalo as young as 30.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project, which could be expanded in May.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and health clinics.

Alberta has said it is extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months. But some cancer patients are able to book a second dose 21 to 28 days after their first.

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans 18 and over a first dose by the end of June.

British Columbia

The province has lowered the eligibility age for people to register for COVID-19 vaccinations.

The Ministry of Health says all adults over the age of 18 are now eligible to register for vaccines through the province’s Get Vaccinated program.

Once registered, users receive a confirmation code. They then wait for an email, text or call telling them they’re eligible and can book their vaccine appointment using that code.

Health authorities are also targeting so-called hot spot communities that have been hardest hit by COVID-19 with dedicated clinics, which the provincial government says are using its “limited” supply of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

B.C. has lowered the age for those eligible to receive the AstraZeneca shot to 30, starting with those in `hot spot’ communities and adding appointments at pharmacies as supplies improve.

Firefighters, police and paramedics, meanwhile, are being vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines alongside staff at schools and childcare centres.

The province says more than 1.7 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines have been administered, with more than 89,000 of those being a second shot.

Nunavut

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from Southern Canada.

The territory expects to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is also providing vaccine to those 18 and older and expects to finish its rollout by the end of April.

It is similarly offering shots to rotational workers and mine employees coming from Southern Canada.

Yukon

There have been almost 48,000 doses of Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon, 25,731 of them first doses and 22, 032 of them second shots.

More than 70 per cent of Yukon residents have received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Health officials say that means they can reduce the hours of operation at the Whitehorse vaccine clinic.

A statement from the territory says at the peak of the process, hundreds of people are day were coming into the Whitehorse clinic.

Deputy health minister Stephen Samis says they’ll scale down operations and focus some efforts on other vaccinations, including pre-kindergarten and routine childhood vaccines.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 29, 2021.

The Canadian Press

How B.C. dodged COVID-19’s first wave, but got swamped by its third

THE BIG STORY | posted Thursday, Apr 29th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, a year ago, as the pandemic’s first wave began to recede, British Columbia was held up as a shining example of a large Canadian province that managed to beat back COVID-19. Its top doctor, Bonnie Henry, was a hero and even something of a celebrity.

A year later, all that has changed. BC has been one of Canada’s worst hit province’s in the third wave, Dr. Henry’s decisions are being second guessed, and a government that won a majority this past fall is no longer being hailed as the pinnacle of pandemic leadership. What happened?

GUEST: Liza Yuzda, Legislative reporter, CityNews1130

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Transat AT reaches $700M aid deal with federal government

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Thursday, Apr 29th, 2021

Travel company Transat AT Inc. says it has reached a deal with Ottawa to borrow up to $700 million.

The money will come through the federal government’s Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility, the same program used to help Air Canada.

“The agreement reached with the government of Canada provides us with an additional $700 million in liquidity, which is the amount we needed to move forward with confidence,” Transat chief executive Jean-Marc Eustache said in a statement Thursday.

“Our strong balance sheet prior to the pandemic and the aggressive actions we have taken since have enabled us to weather this unprecedented crisis so far. With this support, we now look forward to resuming operations as soon as safe travel is possible and travel restrictions can be lifted.”

Transat said $390 million will be used to help support its business, while $310 million will be used to provide reimbursements to travellers.

In connection with the financing, Transat issued the government 13 million warrants for the purchase of Transat shares at an exercise price of $4.50 per share.

Transat has also agreed to restrictions on dividends, stock repurchases and executive compensation as well as to maintain active employment at the level of Wednesday.

Transat has endured a tough year, suspending all flights following the federal government’s request in January to stop travel to Mexico and the Caribbean due to the pandemic.

Air Canada and Transat announced earlier this month that the two Montreal-based companies had agreed to call off a deal that would have seen the country’s largest airline buy its smaller rival.

Initiated two years ago, the takeover was priced at $720 million before shrinking to $190 million as COVID-19 pounded the transport sector, ultimately dying out on April 2.

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Wednesday, April 28, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Apr 28th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 28, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 256,320 new vaccinations administered for a total of 12,564,105 doses given. Nationwide, 1,046,015 people or 2.8 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 33,151.305 per 100,000.

There were 8,212 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 14,392,164 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 87.3 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 27,625 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 166,047 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 317.107 per 1,000. In the province, 1.85 per cent (9,675) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 187,880 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 88.38 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 6,878 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 49,896 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 314.545 per 1,000. In the province, 6.49 per cent (10,291) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 58,225 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 37 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.7 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 65,573 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 283,591 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 290.595 per 1,000. In the province, 3.59 per cent (35,002) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 345,940 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 35 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 43,988 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 248,564 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 318.655 per 1,000. In the province, 3.15 per cent (24,583) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 277,435 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.59 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 45,757 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,916,897 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 340.892 per 1,000. There were 8,212 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 3,281,079 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 88.9 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 94,819 new vaccinations administered for a total of 4,791,030 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 326.163 per 1,000. In the province, 2.47 per cent (362,563) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 5,637,955 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 8,512 new vaccinations administered for a total of 437,831 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 317.959 per 1,000. In the province, 5.22 per cent (71,926) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 524,250 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.52 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 5,045 new vaccinations administered for a total of 408,429 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 346.375 per 1,000. In the province, 3.70 per cent (43,625) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 429,165 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.17 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 49,597 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,468,785 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 333.66 per 1,000. In the province, 6.47 per cent (284,870) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 1,575,635 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.22 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 35,756 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,671,128 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 325.656 per 1,000. In the province, 1.74 per cent (89,457) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 1,922,180 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 37 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.94 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 346 new vaccinations administered for a total of 47,763 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,144.545 per 1,000. In the territory, 52.80 per cent (22,032) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 54,320 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 130 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 87.93 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 46,800 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,037.257 per 1,000. In the territory, 46.42 per cent (20,943) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 56,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 83.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 27,344 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 706.089 per 1,000. In the territory, 31.45 per cent (12,181) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 41,800 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 110 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 65.42 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, April 28, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Apr 28th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 28, 2021.

There are 1,194,989 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 1,194,989 confirmed cases (84,313 active, 1,086,611 resolved, 24,065 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 7,072 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 221.85 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 55,947 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,992.

There were 55 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 352 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 50. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.32 per 100,000 people.

There have been 31,064,387 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,062 confirmed cases (28 active, 1,028 resolved, six deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 5.36 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 14 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 240,170 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 177 confirmed cases (11 active, 166 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 6.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 140,238 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 2,215 confirmed cases (419 active, 1,729 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 96 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 42.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 384 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 55.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 514,150 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,882 confirmed cases (138 active, 1,708 resolved, 36 deaths).

There were 24 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 17.66 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 85 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 12.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.05 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 293,478 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 346,596 confirmed cases (10,007 active, 325,691 resolved, 10,898 deaths).

There were 899 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 116.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,416 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,059.

There were 12 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 66 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 127.1 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,133,625 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 452,126 confirmed cases (39,914 active, 404,248 resolved, 7,964 deaths).

There were 3,265 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 270.9 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 27,215 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,888.

There were 29 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 207 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 30. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.2 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.05 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,760,497 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 38,025 confirmed cases (2,173 active, 34,884 resolved, 968 deaths).

There were 218 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 157.55 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,557 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 222.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of eight new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.18 per 100,000 people.

There have been 666,271 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 40,401 confirmed cases (2,518 active, 37,401 resolved, 482 deaths).

There were 224 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 213.63 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,749 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 250.

There were six new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 40.89 per 100,000 people.

There have been 754,269 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 184,840 confirmed cases (20,721 active, 162,052 resolved, 2,067 deaths).

There were 1,539 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 468.6 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,309 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,616.

There were seven new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 18 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,073,769 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 127,048 confirmed cases (8,327 active, 117,150 resolved, 1,571 deaths).

There were 799 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 161.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 6,159 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 880.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 32 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.52 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,449,472 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 81 confirmed cases (zero active, 79 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.34 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,913 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 51 confirmed cases (eight active, 43 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 17.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 17,984 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 472 confirmed cases (49 active, 419 resolved, four deaths).

There were eight new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 124.51 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 44 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is six.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,475 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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