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A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Wednesday, April 28, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Apr 28th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 28, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 256,320 new vaccinations administered for a total of 12,564,105 doses given. Nationwide, 1,046,015 people or 2.8 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 33,151.305 per 100,000.

There were 8,212 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 14,392,164 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 87.3 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 27,625 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 166,047 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 317.107 per 1,000. In the province, 1.85 per cent (9,675) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 187,880 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 88.38 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 6,878 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 49,896 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 314.545 per 1,000. In the province, 6.49 per cent (10,291) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 58,225 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 37 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.7 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 65,573 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 283,591 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 290.595 per 1,000. In the province, 3.59 per cent (35,002) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 345,940 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 35 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 43,988 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 248,564 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 318.655 per 1,000. In the province, 3.15 per cent (24,583) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 277,435 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.59 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 45,757 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,916,897 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 340.892 per 1,000. There were 8,212 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 3,281,079 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 88.9 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 94,819 new vaccinations administered for a total of 4,791,030 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 326.163 per 1,000. In the province, 2.47 per cent (362,563) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 5,637,955 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 8,512 new vaccinations administered for a total of 437,831 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 317.959 per 1,000. In the province, 5.22 per cent (71,926) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 524,250 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 38 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.52 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 5,045 new vaccinations administered for a total of 408,429 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 346.375 per 1,000. In the province, 3.70 per cent (43,625) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 429,165 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.17 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 49,597 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,468,785 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 333.66 per 1,000. In the province, 6.47 per cent (284,870) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 1,575,635 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 36 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.22 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 35,756 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,671,128 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 325.656 per 1,000. In the province, 1.74 per cent (89,457) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 1,922,180 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 37 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.94 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 346 new vaccinations administered for a total of 47,763 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,144.545 per 1,000. In the territory, 52.80 per cent (22,032) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 54,320 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 130 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 87.93 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 46,800 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,037.257 per 1,000. In the territory, 46.42 per cent (20,943) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 56,300 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 83.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 27,344 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 706.089 per 1,000. In the territory, 31.45 per cent (12,181) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 41,800 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 110 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 65.42 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Wednesday, April 28, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Apr 28th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 28, 2021.

There are 1,194,989 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 1,194,989 confirmed cases (84,313 active, 1,086,611 resolved, 24,065 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 7,072 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 221.85 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 55,947 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,992.

There were 55 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 352 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 50. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.32 per 100,000 people.

There have been 31,064,387 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,062 confirmed cases (28 active, 1,028 resolved, six deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 5.36 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 14 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 240,170 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 177 confirmed cases (11 active, 166 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 6.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 140,238 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 2,215 confirmed cases (419 active, 1,729 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 96 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 42.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 384 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 55.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 514,150 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,882 confirmed cases (138 active, 1,708 resolved, 36 deaths).

There were 24 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 17.66 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 85 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 12.

There was one new reported death Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.05 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 293,478 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 346,596 confirmed cases (10,007 active, 325,691 resolved, 10,898 deaths).

There were 899 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 116.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,416 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,059.

There were 12 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 66 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 127.1 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,133,625 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 452,126 confirmed cases (39,914 active, 404,248 resolved, 7,964 deaths).

There were 3,265 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 270.9 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 27,215 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,888.

There were 29 new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 207 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 30. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.2 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.05 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,760,497 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 38,025 confirmed cases (2,173 active, 34,884 resolved, 968 deaths).

There were 218 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 157.55 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,557 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 222.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of eight new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.18 per 100,000 people.

There have been 666,271 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 40,401 confirmed cases (2,518 active, 37,401 resolved, 482 deaths).

There were 224 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 213.63 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,749 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 250.

There were six new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 40.89 per 100,000 people.

There have been 754,269 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 184,840 confirmed cases (20,721 active, 162,052 resolved, 2,067 deaths).

There were 1,539 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 468.6 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,309 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,616.

There were seven new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 18 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,073,769 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 127,048 confirmed cases (8,327 active, 117,150 resolved, 1,571 deaths).

There were 799 new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 161.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 6,159 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 880.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 32 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.52 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,449,472 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 81 confirmed cases (zero active, 79 resolved, two deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There were zero new reported deaths Tuesday. Over the past seven days there has been one new reported death. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.34 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,913 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 51 confirmed cases (eight active, 43 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 17.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 17,984 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 472 confirmed cases (49 active, 419 resolved, four deaths).

There were eight new cases Tuesday. The rate of active cases is 124.51 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 44 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is six.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,475 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

For South Asian-Canadians, two pandemics at once

THE BIG STORY | posted Wednesday, Apr 28th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, in neighbourhoods like Peel in Ontario, South Asian-Canadians are being impacted by COVID-19 at a much greater number than their share of the population. At the same time, many have friends and family in India, which is facing perhaps the worst outbreak of the entire global pandemic. As South Asian-Canadians in hotspots try to navigate inequality at home, they’re also desperate to help their loved ones overseas.

Now that India’s hospital system has collapsed, global aid is finally on the way. But will it be enough? How did things get so bad? What can Canada, and Canadians, do to help both a country in trouble, and our neighbours in despair?

GUEST: Sabina Vohra-Miller, clinical pharmacologist, co-founder of the South Asian Health Network

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Apr 27th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

Provinces have yet to move the threshold quite that low, however.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Residents who are between the ages of 55 to 64 have access to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

People 65 and older, Indigenous adults, people considered “clinically extremely vulnerable” and rotational workers, truck drivers and flight crew have access to the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Nova Scotia

Residents as young as 55 can book an appointment for a Pfizer of Moderna vaccine.

The province continues to offer the AstraZeneca vaccine to people aged 55-64.

Prince Edward Island

Beginning April 26, people in the province between the ages of 40 and 59 can start booking appointments for a COVID-19 vaccine.

People 16 years and older who have certain underlying medical conditions, pregnant woman and eligible members of their household can also get a vaccine.

New Brunswick

People as young as 65 and older can get vaccinated at pharmacies or at a health clinic.

Individuals 40 years old and older with three or more select chronic health conditions are also eligible.

Quebec

The province has expanded its vaccination rollout to people with chronic illnesses who don’t require regular hospital care as well as to those with intellectual or physical disabilities.

Quebec expanded AstraZeneca availability to people as young as 45.

Ontario

Ontario has said everyone aged 60 and older is eligible to receive a vaccine, though some local public health units have lowered the threshold on their own.

The province has also expanded eligibility for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, saying those 40 and older can start receiving the shot. Shots are available through pharmacies and primary care providers.

But Premier Doug Ford’s office noted that provincial officials have warned that the next two shipments of the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot to the province could be delayed.

Ford’s office says he has reached out to “international allies” for help acquiring more supply of the vaccine for the province.

Ontario, meantime, has doubled the number of pharmacies involved in the provincial vaccine effort.

Some 1,400 pharmacies in COVID-19 hot spots are now offering the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The province says it hopes to add another 100 pharmacies to the vaccine effort by the end of the month.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for First Nations people aged 30 and up and others aged 50 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability.

All front-line police officers, firefighters and health-care workers, regardless of age, qualify as well.

The province is also vaccinating all adults in high-risk areas. Anyone over 18 who lives or works in the northern health region can get a vaccine. And any adult who lives in four Winnipeg neighbourhoods —  Downtown East, Point Douglas South, Seven Oaks West and Inkster East — can get a shot as well. Adults who don’t live in those neighbourhoods but who work there in certain jobs that deal with the public can also get vaccinated. Those jobs include teachers, grocery store workers, food-processing staff and restaurant employees.

Roughly 33 per cent of Manitoba’s adult population has had at least one vaccine dose.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority is currently booking vaccinations for residents 44 and older, however the age eligibility is expected to be lowered to 40 starting Wednesday. The minimum age for people living in the Far North is already 40.

Additional health-care workers are eligible for shots: staff in private doctors’ offices, private digital imaging clinics, community labs and the Saskatchewan cancer agency.

The province has also expanded the vaccine delivery plan for people in more vulnerable groups to include all pregnant women and 16- and 17-year-olds who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Saskatchewan has also dropped the age at which people can receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55, although the premier says there are less than 9,000 doses available.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province. However, drive-thru sites in Regina and Saskatoon have been temporarily suspended due to limited supply.

Alberta

Albertans born in 2009 or earlier with high-risk underlying health conditions are eligible for shots.

The next phase of health-care workers can also book appointments: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, their office staff, lab workers, practicum students in clinical areas, as well as health workers on First Nations reserves and Metis settlements.

Previously, shots have been available to front-line health workers, staff and residents in supportive living facilities, Albertans born in 1956 or earlier and First Nations, Inuit and Metis people born in 1971 or earlier.

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, the province has lowered the minimum age to 40 from 55.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project, which could be expanded in May.

About 15,000 workers at 136 meat-packing plants across the province can also get shots at on-site clinics, pharmacies and health clinics.

Alberta has said it is extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months. But some cancer patients are able to book a second dose 21 to 28 days after their first.

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans 18 and over a first dose by the end of June.

British Columbia

The province is lowering the eligibility age for people to register for COVID-19 vaccinations.

The Ministry of Health says all adults over the age of 18 are now eligible to register for vaccines through the province’s Get Vaccinated program.

Once registered, users receive a confirmation code. They then wait for an email, text or call telling them they’re eligible and can book their vaccine appointment using that code.

B.C. has joined other provinces in lowering the age for those eligible to receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot to 40.

Firefighters, police and paramedics, meanwhile, are being vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines alongside staff at schools and childcare centres.

As of Monday, the province said about 1.6 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines had been administered, with about 89,035 of those being a second dose.

Nunavut

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

It is also offering shots to rotational workers coming from southern Canada.

The territory expects to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is also providing vaccine to those 18 and older and expects to finish its rollout by the end of April.

It is similarly offering shots to rotational workers and mine employees coming from southern Canada.

Yukon

The Yukon government says 71 per cent of the territory’s eligible resident have received their first COVID-19 vaccination as it makes plan for returning students and seasonal workers to get their shots.

Dr. Brendan Hanley, Yukon’s chief medical officer of health, says students returning to Yukon, along with seasonal workers, would be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine during their mandatory self-isolation, provided they test negative for the virus after taking a rapid test.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 27, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Ontario asks federal government for enhanced measures for interprovincial travellers

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Apr 27th, 2021

TORONTO — The Ontario government is asking Ottawa for enhanced measures for interprovincial travellers as the province grapples with skyrocketing hospitalizations and cases of COVID-19 variants.

In a letter Monday to the federal ministers of health and public safety, Ontario says it has already closed its boundaries with Quebec and Manitoba to non-essential travel, but there are no measures in place to protect provinces from the spread of COVID-19 variants through interprovincial air travel, an area of federal responsibility.

The province is asking for mandatory pre-departure PCR testing for all domestic air travellers entering Ontario, an extension to current rules for international passengers seeking entry into Canada.

The letter, which was shared with The Canadian Press, says there have been 17 domestic flights in the past two weeks to Toronto’s Person International Airport with possible COVID-19 exposures.

It adds there have also been potential exposures on flights landing at other Ontario airports, including Ottawa and Hamilton.

The letter comes as health-care workers from Newfoundland and Labrador are set to arrive in Ontario today, as well as three teams of nurses and medical technicians from the Canadian Armed Forces.

It says limiting mobility is a key factor to reducing the risk of further spread of COVID-19 variants.

“Over 70 per cent of daily cases in Ontario have been confirmed as variants of concern,” says the letter signed by Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott and Solicitor General Sylvia Jones.

“These variants entered through our borders, both international and domestic, and it is critical that every effort is made to keep them out.”

The letter says it is crucial that the transport of essential goods is not hindered by border measures, but “it is likewise crucial that all non-essential travel be curtailed.”

“The introduction of stricter pre-departure testing measures, in addition to providing an extra layer of protection for interprovincial travellers, is a significant step to achieve that goal and ensure that collectively we are doing all we can to protect our citizens,” the letter reads.

“These new measures should be in place for as long as necessary, or until the risks of new variants in Canada have been effectively minimized.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 27, 2021.

The Canadian Press

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, Apr. 26, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Apr 26th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Monday April 26, 2021.

There are 1,178,986 confirmed cases in Canada.

Canada: 1,178,986 confirmed cases (86,229 active, 1,068,792 resolved, 23,965 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 6,982 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 226.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 55,530 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,933.

There were 38 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 343 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 49. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.06 per 100,000 people.

There have been 30,809,196 tests completed.

Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,058 confirmed cases (29 active, 1,023 resolved, six deaths).

There were two new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 5.55 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 15 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 238,977 tests completed.

Prince Edward Island: 175 confirmed cases (11 active, 164 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 6.89 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 139,087 tests completed.

Nova Scotia: 2,053 confirmed cases (263 active, 1,723 resolved, 67 deaths).

There were 63 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 26.85 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 246 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 35.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.84 per 100,000 people.

There have been 495,295 tests completed.

New Brunswick: 1,851 confirmed cases (131 active, 1,685 resolved, 35 deaths).

There were four new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 16.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 63 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is nine.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 4.48 per 100,000 people.

There have been 291,636 tests completed.

Quebec: 344,808 confirmed cases (10,844 active, 323,086 resolved, 10,878 deaths).

There were 1,014 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 126.47 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,856 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,122.

There were nine new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 77 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 126.86 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,076,974 tests completed.

Ontario: 445,351 confirmed cases (41,157 active, 396,283 resolved, 7,911 deaths).

There were 3,947 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 279.33 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 28,356 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 4,051.

There were 24 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 195 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 28. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 53.69 per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,679,981 tests completed.

Manitoba: 37,598 confirmed cases (2,024 active, 34,607 resolved, 967 deaths).

There were 259 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 146.75 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,439 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 206.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of eight new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 70.11 per 100,000 people.

There have been 657,128 tests completed.

Saskatchewan: 39,932 confirmed cases (2,515 active, 36,942 resolved, 475 deaths).

There were 249 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 213.37 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,774 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 253.

There were two new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 10 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 40.3 per 100,000 people.

There have been 748,282 tests completed.

Alberta: 181,806 confirmed cases (20,136 active, 159,603 resolved, 2,067 deaths).

There were 1,437 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 455.37 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 11,011 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,573.

There were three new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 27 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.74 per 100,000 people.

There have been 4,024,151 tests completed.

British Columbia: 123,758 confirmed cases (9,065 active, 113,139 resolved, 1,554 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 176.1 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,718 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 674.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 24 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 30.19 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,420,042 tests completed.

Yukon: 80 confirmed cases (two active, 77 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 4.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,865 tests completed.

Northwest Territories: 48 confirmed cases (five active, 43 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 11.07 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 17,577 tests completed.

Nunavut: 455 confirmed cases (47 active, 404 resolved, four deaths).

There were seven new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 119.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 38 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is five.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,125 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published April 26, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Apr 26th, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin says that’s if provinces follow the advice to delay second doses up to four months.

He also cautions that it is dependent on having no production delays again.

Health Canada anticipates a total of 36.5 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine from the Serum Institute of India by June 30.

Provinces initially suspended giving AstraZeneca shots to people under the age of 55 based on an advisory committee’s advice, but their recommendation changed on April 23 to reflect that the shot is safe for anyone aged 30 and older.

Provinces have yet to move the threshold quite that low, however.

There are approximately 31 million Canadians over 16, and no vaccines are approved for anyone younger than 16.

Here’s a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada:

Newfoundland and Labrador

Three of Newfoundland and Labrador’s four regional health authorities have begun administering the Pfizer and Moderna shots to adults aged 65 and older, and those deemed “clinically extremely vulnerable.”

Rotational workers, truck drivers and flight crew are also receiving those shots.

The fourth regional health authority — Labrador-Grenfell Health — is vaccinating everyone in Phase 1 and 2 of the province’s vaccine rollout. That includes people aged 60 and older, front-line health-care workers and first responders.

Across the province, the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is being used for people between the ages of 55 and 64. The province said it doesn’t have any immediate plans to lower the age threshold following new recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.

Nova Scotia

All Nova Scotians who want a vaccination should be able to get their first shot by late June, chief medical officer of health Dr. Robert Strang announced on April 9. The original target was September.

On April 19, the province announced that people aged 60 and older could book appointments for both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is also available for those 55 to 64 years old.

The province is also planning to use mobile van clinics to vaccinate about 900 people who work at or use homeless shelters in the Halifax area.

Public health is partnering with pharmacists and doctors to provide the vaccines at 25 locations.

Nova Scotia, meanwhile, has added front-line police officers to the list of people eligible for vaccination during the second phase of the province’s rollout plan, joining groups such as long-haul truck drivers and hospital workers over the age of 60.

Prince Edward Island

Health officials in Prince Edward Island say they will shift their focus to getting a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine to all adults by July 1, even if it means delaying the second shot for some.

Starting today (Apr. 26) people over age 40 can book an appointment to get a vaccine shot.

Individuals 16 years of age and older with with underlying medical conditions and women who are pregnant (as well as all eligible members of their respective households) are also eligible to book shots.

P.E.I., meantime, has suspended administering the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to people under age 55 due to concerns about a possible link between the shot and rare blood clots.

New Brunswick

New Brunswick health officials say people 65 and older, a caregiver or a family member acting on their behalf can now make an appointment for a vaccine at a pharmacy.

Health-care professionals who have close contact with patients, and people with complex medical conditions are also eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

The province says all residents of long-term care homes have been offered at least one dose of vaccine.

As of March 19, all residents of First Nations communities aged 16 and older were given access to their first dose of vaccine.

Workers who regularly travel across the border, including regular commuters, truckers and rotational workers are also  eligible to receive vaccines.

Quebec

Quebec has expanded access to COVID-19 vaccines to Montrealers who are essential workers or who have chronic illnesses.

Essential workers such as teachers and first responders can now book an appointment after providing proof of employment.

Quebec has also opened vaccination appointments for anyone over the age of 60 across the province.

Quebecers between the ages of 45 and 79 can now receive an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine at walk-in clinics.

Officials announced on April 8 the first 13 companies that will operate clinics in their workplaces, with each site able to vaccinate up to 25,000 people between May and August.

Participating companies include National Bank, Bell, and Groupe CH, owner of the Montreal Canadiens NHL team. The clinics will be located in eight different health regions and should be operational by May 1.

Montreal’s airport authority will partner with Air Canada and Bombardier to create a vaccination hub that will operate two sites at the departure level of the airport terminal and in a nearby Bombardier hangar.

Ontario

Ontario has said everyone aged 60 and older is eligible to receive a vaccine, though some local public health units have lowered the threshold on their own.

The province has also expanded eligibility for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, saying those 40 and older can start receiving the shot. Shots are available through pharmacies and primary care providers.

But Premier Doug Ford’s office noted that provincial officials have warned that the next two shipments of the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot to the province could be delayed.

Ford’s office says he has reached out to “international allies” for help acquiring more supply of the vaccine for the province.

Ontario, meantime, has doubled the number of pharmacies involved in the provincial vaccine effort.

Some 1,400 pharmacies in COVID-19 hot spots are now offering the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The province says it hopes to add another 100 pharmacies to the vaccine effort by the end of the month.

Manitoba

Manitoba is using the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for First Nations people aged 30 and up and others aged 50 and up. These are available through a few channels including so-called supersites in larger communities. Health officials plan to continue reducing the age minimum, bit by bit, over the coming months.

The province is also allowing anyone 40 and over to get an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine through pharmacies and medical clinics, subject to availability.

Manitoba has opened its vaccination program to all front-line police officers and firefighters across the province, regardless of age.

The province, meantime, has expanded vaccination eligibility to everyone over the age of 18 living, and some working, in three Winnipeg neighbourhoods designated as COVID-19 hot spots.

The priority communities include Downtown East, Point Douglas South, and Inkster East.

Workers in those areas whose jobs involve dealing with the public, such as teachers, grocery store workers and restaurant employees are among those eligible for shots.

Roughly 5.2 per cent of Manitoba’s population has now been fully vaccinated.

Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan Health Authority is currently booking vaccinations for residents 44 and older, however the age eligibility is expected to be lowered to 40 starting Wednesday, Apr. 28. The minimum age for people living in the Far North is already 40.

Additional health-care workers are eligible for shots: staff in private doctors’ offices, private digital imaging clinics, community labs and the Saskatchewan cancer agency.

The province has also expanded the vaccine delivery plan for people in more vulnerable groups to include all pregnant women and 16- and 17-year-olds who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Saskatchewan has also dropped the age at which people can receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55, although the premier says there are less than 9,000 doses available.

There are drive-thru and walk-in vaccination clinics in communities across the province. However, drive-thru sites in Regina and Saskatoon have been temporarily suspended due to limited supply.

Alberta

Albertans born in 2005 or earlier with high-risk underlying health conditions are eligible for shots.

The next phase of health-care workers can also book appointments: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, their office staff, lab workers, practicum students in clinical areas, as well as health workers on First Nations reserves and Metis settlements.

Previously, shots have been available to front-line health workers, staff and residents in supportive living facilities, Albertans born in 1956 or earlier and First Nations, Inuit and Metis people born in 1971 or earlier.

More than 250 pharmacies are offering immunizations. Ten physicians clinics across the province are also providing shots as part of a pilot project, which could be expanded in May.

The province has also lowered the minimum age for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to 40 from 55.

Alberta has said it is extending the time between the first dose and the second to four months — although officials said Thursday some cancer patients will be able to book a second dose 21 to 28 days after their first.

Health Minister Tyler Shandro has said the province expects to offer all Albertans 18 and over a first dose of vaccine by the end of June.

British Columbia

The province is lowering the eligibility age for people to register for COVID-19 vaccinations.

The Ministry of Health says all adults over the age of 18 are now eligible to register for vaccines through the province’s Get Vaccinated program.

Once registered, users receive a confirmation code. They then wait for an email, text or call telling them they’re eligible and can book their vaccine appointment using that code.

B.C. has joined other provinces in lowering the age for those eligible to receive the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot to 40.

Firefighters, police and paramedics, meanwhile, are being vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines alongside staff at schools and childcare centres.

As of Sunday, the province reported 1.73 per cent (88,663) of the population had been fully vaccinated.

Nunavut

Nunavut has opened vaccinations to anyone 18 and older.

The territory expects to finish its vaccine rollout of first and second doses by the end of April.

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is also providing vaccine to those 18 and older and expects to finish its rollout by the end of April.

Yukon

The Yukon government says 71 per cent of the territory’s eligible resident have received their first COVID-19 vaccination as it makes plan for returning students and seasonal workers to get their shots.

Dr. Brendan Hanley, Yukon’s chief medical officer of health, says students returning to Yukon, along with seasonal workers, would be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine during their mandatory self-isolation, provided they test negative for the virus after taking a rapid test.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 26, 2021.

The Canadian Press

More than 1,000 dockworkers at Port of Montreal scheduled to begin strike today

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Apr 26th, 2021

MONTREAL — More than 1,000 dockworkers at the Port of Montreal are scheduled to go on strike this morning — a move that the port authority says will mean a total shutdown of all port operations.

The dockworker’s union, affiliated with the Canadian Union of Public Employees, says the Maritime Employers Association doesn’t want to negotiate and is pursuing a policy of provocation that includes changes to work schedules.

The association, in turn, has said it’s disappointed with the union’s decision and is now reviewing its options.

Federal Labour Minister Filomena Tassi said Sunday that the government has filed notice that it will table back-to-work legislation in the coming days if an agreement is not reached.

Tassi said the government would prefer not to intervene but may have no choice given what she called the significant and potentially long-lasting harm to Canada’s economy caused by the work stoppage.

The workers, who have been without a contract since December 2018, have been on an overtime strike since April 17 and have refused to work weekends since April 18.

Several employers groups have raised concerns about the impact of the strike on business.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 26, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Yukon Liberals set to be sworn-in as party aims to form minority government

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Friday, Apr 23rd, 2021

WHITEHORSE — Members of the Yukon Liberals will be sworn-in today as the party aims to form a minority government.

The election finished with the incumbent Liberals and the Yukon Party tied at eight seats, with the New Democrats winning three.

A majority government needs 10 seats.

Winning candidates from the New Democrats and Yukon Party have already been sworn in.

Yukon Party Leader Currie Dixon says a lack of communication from Liberal Leader Sandy Silver leads him to conclude the Liberals are trying to form a government with support from the NDP.

The Liberals could not be reached for comment on Thursday, while the New Democrats said they have spoken to both of the other main parties.

“We are having conversations with both the Yukon Party and the Liberals,” said Francois Picard, the chief of staff for the NDP caucus. “We don’t plan on negotiating through the media so out of respect for all parties, we’ll continue those conversations and won’t speculate on their outcome,”

Dixon said he expects the Liberals to try and form a government with the backing of the NDP.

“The fact the Liberals haven’t even bothered to reach out to us indicates their clear preference is to form a left-wing coalition,” he added.

Dixon acknowledged the Liberals get the first attempt to form a government, but he questioned the delay in announcing their plans.

“My message to (Silver) today and the Liberal party today is get on with it, because Yukoners are looking for government and leadership,” he said in an interview.

The loss in seats for the Liberals claimed one high-profile politician as the territory’s health minister was defeated by her NDP opponent in the small riding of Vuntut Gwichin after a recount ended in a tie. The winner was chosen by a drawing of lots.

Speaking before the judicial recount, Silver said its outcome would not change the fact that his party was in a minority government situation.

“Pending the outcome of discussions with other party leaders, it is my intention to swear in a cabinet shortly and to test the confidence of the house with a speech from the throne and one or more budget bills.”

The Liberals stormed to a surprise majority election win in 2016, bringing an end to 14 years of Yukon Party rule.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 23, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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