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A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Feb 10th, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 25,230 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,123,563 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 2,964.603 per 100,000.

There were 4,000 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 1,278,015 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 87.91 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland is reporting 2,516 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 12,596 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 24.055 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 17,475 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 72.08 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 972 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 8,828 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 55.652 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 10,200 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.55 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 3,661 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 18,826 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 19.291 per 1,000. There were 4,000 new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 34,800 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 54.1 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 1,366 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 18,643 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 23.90 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 25,850 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 72.12 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 3,406 new vaccinations administered for a total of 262,594 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 30.689 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 294,825 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.07 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 12,462 new vaccinations administered for a total of 398,633 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 27.138 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 437,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 91.02 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 1,186 new vaccinations administered for a total of 49,373 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 35.855 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 66,090 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 74.71 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 1,534 new vaccinations administered for a total of 44,521 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 37.757 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 44,575 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 99.88 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 3,968 new vaccinations administered for a total of 124,325 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 28.243 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 132,475 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 93.85 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 1,089 new vaccinations administered for a total of 155,585 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 30.319 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 172,950 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.96 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 175 new vaccinations administered for a total of 11,234 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 269.20 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 14,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 35 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 78.01 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting 225 new vaccinations administered for a total of 12,466 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 276.292 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 14,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 32 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 86.57 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 87 new vaccinations administered for a total of 5,939 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 153.36 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 12,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 31 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 49.49 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Feb. 10, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Feds promise new funds for public transit, most money won’t arrive for years

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Wednesday, Feb 10th, 2021

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the federal government will provide nearly $15 billion for public-transit projects across the country — though most of the money won’t arrive until later in the decade.

Trudeau says the promised $14.9 billion in new public-transit funding will be spread over eight years, though most of the money won’t start flowing until 2026.

The government says the new funds will provide cities with predictable funding to plan for their long-term needs while helping Canadians move around easier and fight climate change.

Trudeau announced the new funding during a teleconference this morning ahead of a virtual meeting with mayors from Canada’s largest cities.

Many of those mayors and their local governments are struggling to make ends meet as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage economies due to the need for lockdowns.

They are also facing uncertainties when it comes to how their communities will look after the pandemic, including the extent to which public-transit needs be affected by telework and other changes.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 10, 2021.

The Canadian Press

World economy will lose trillions if poor countries shorted on vaccines: OECD

MIKE BLANCHFIELD, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Feb 9th, 2021

As the Trudeau government is forced to explain delays rolling out COVID-19 vaccines, some of the world’s economic and health leaders are warning of catastrophic financial consequences if poorer countries are shortchanged on vaccinations.

At a video meeting convened by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on Monday, Secretary-General Angel Gurria predicted that rich countries would see their economies shrink by trillions of dollars if they don’t do more to help poor countries receive vaccines.

The leaders of the World Health Organization and others also bemoaned the long-term damage of continued “vaccine nationalism” if current trends continue — rich countries getting a pandemic cure at a much higher rate than poorer ones.

It was a message that could provide some political cover for the Liberals, who have been widely criticized for shortfalls in deliveries of vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna while also facing international criticism for pre-buying enough doses of vaccines to cover Canada’s population several times over.

Some international anti-poverty groups have also criticized Canada for planning to take delivery of 1.9 million doses from the COVAX Facility, a new international vaccine-sharing program that is primarily designed to help poor countries afford unaffordable vaccines, but also allows rich donor countries — including Canada — to receive vaccines.

Trudeau and his cabinet ministers on the vaccine file have repeatedly said that the pandemic can’t be stamped out for good if it isn’t defeated everywhere.

They say Canada is a trading nation that depends on the welfare of others for its economic prosperity — especially with the emergence of new variants of the virus in South Africa and Britain.

But their protestations are usually drowned out in the domestic clamour that tends to highlight unfavourable comparisons of Canada’s vaccine rollout with the United States, Britain or other countries.

On Monday, Gurria — the veteran Mexican politician who has led the OECD for 15 years — brought the full force of his political gravitas by offering up a pocketbook argument that eschewed any pretence of altruism.

“It’s a smart thing to do. It is ethically and morally right. But it is also economically right,” said Gurria.

“The global economy stands to lose as much as $9.2 trillion, which is close to half the size of the U.S. economy, just to put it in context … as much as half of which would fall on advanced economies, so they would lose around $5 trillion.”

The OECD is an international forum of more than three dozen mainly democratic and developed countries, including Canada, that aims to help foster economic growth and trade. It also conducts comprehensive economic research and issues the world’s most authoritative annual report on what rich countries spend on foreign aid.

Canada’s former finance minister Bill Morneau, who resigned last summer during the WE funding scandal, had said he was leaving politics because he long wanted to pursue the OECD leadership when Gurria departs later this year. In January, Morneau abandoned that ambition, saying he didn’t have enough support among member countries.

Meanwhile, Trudeau said last week that Canada remains committed to helping poor countries cope with COVID-19 through its $220-million pledge to COVAX, and its $865-million commitment to the ACT Accelerator, which tries to ensure low- and middle-income countries have equitable access to medical treatments during the pandemic.

But Jorge Moreira da Silva, the OECD’s development co-operation director, said COVAX is underfunded by US$5 billion, while the World Health Organization is predicting at US$27-billion shortfall for the ACT Accelerator.

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the WHO director-general, said 75 per cent of vaccine doses are being administered in 10 wealthy countries.

“It’s understandable that governments want to prioritize vaccinating their own health workers and older people first. But it’s not right to vaccinate young, healthy adults in rich countries before health workers and older people in low-income nations,” Tedros told the OECD forum.

“We must ensure that vaccines, diagnostics and life-saving therapies reach those most at risk and on the front lines in all countries. This is not just a moral imperative. It’s also an economic imperative.”

Trudeau has repeatedly said that all Canadians who want a vaccine will get one by the end of September but that it is too soon to say how the government will eventually decide to share its excess doses globally.

At Monday’s forum, a spokesman for the pharmaceutical industry said the bumps and grinds of vaccine delivery to poor countries would be transformed into “a huge success” in the coming months.

“I think it’s dangerous to talk about, you know, this is a huge moral injustice already now because … you will have significant rollout to developing countries,” said Thomas Cueni, the director-general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations.

“I haven’t seen a single industrialized country, maybe with the exception of Israel, where young and healthy people are vaccinated.”

Poll suggests Americans split over decision to impeach Trump as Senate trial begins

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Feb 9th, 2021

When it comes to impeaching Donald Trump, a new poll suggests Americans are just as divided as the United States Senate.

The online Léger poll, conducted last month for the Association for Canadian Studies, found 49 per cent of U.S. respondents supported impeachment.

Forty per cent said they opposed it, while 11 per cent said they didn’t know.

A similar split exists in the Senate, where the former president will stand trial beginning today on a single count of inciting an insurrection.

The week-long trial isn’t currently expected to end in conviction, which requires two-thirds of the 100 senators to vote in favour.

Online polls cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population.

Trump was impeached in the House on Jan. 13, days after an angry mob of his supporters laid siege to Capitol Hill while lawmakers were certifying President Joe Biden’s election win.

He’s the first U.S. president ever to be impeached twice.

Trump won’t be there in person, but his lawyers are set to argue that the trial is unconstitutional because he’s no longer the commander-in-chief.

They would be wrong, prominent conservative lawyer Chuck Cooper wrote in the Wall Street Journal — an opinion Sen. Chuck Schumer, the Democrats’ leader in the Senate, felt obliged to mention Monday.

“For the past few weeks, the political right has been searching for a safe harbour, a way to oppose the conviction of Donald Trump without passing judgment on his conduct,” Schumer said.

“The truth is, no such safe harbour exists.”

Conviction in the Senate would be followed by a second vote on whether to prohibit Trump from seeking the presidency again — a constitutional wrinkle that applies only to “former officers,” thereby undermining Trump’s own defence strategy, Cooper wrote.

“If the former president is convicted,” Schumer said, “we will proceed to a vote on whether he is qualified to enjoy any office of honour, trust or profit under the United States.”

Of the U.S. respondents to the poll, 54 per cent said they would like to see Trump banned from a 2024 run, while 39 per cent said he should be allowed to seek the job again.

The Léger poll also asked Canadians a separate set of questions that suggest they’re ready to turn the page on the Trump era.

Some 61 per cent of the poll’s 1,559 Canadian respondents said they expect Canada-U.S. relations to improve under Biden, compared with 15 per cent who anticipate more tension.

Another 13 per cent said they expect no change and 11 per cent didn’t know.

The poll was conducted during the final week of January, which was after Biden signed an executive order on his first day in the White House cancelling the Keystone XL pipeline expansion.

Of those respondents who anticipated worsening relations, 38 per cent were in Alberta and 25 per cent in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Meanwhile, only 43 per cent of U.S. respondents who were asked the same question expected relations to improve, compared to 28 per cent who said they expect a downturn.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Tuesday, Feb 9th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday Feb. 9, 2021.

There are 808,120 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 808,120 confirmed cases (40,175 active, 747,110 resolved, 20,835 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 3,860 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 105.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 24,531 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,504.

There were 68 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 699 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 100. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.26 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.82 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 427 confirmed cases (30 active, 393 resolved, four deaths).

There were 11 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 5.75 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 113 confirmed cases (three active, 110 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 1.88 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,586 confirmed cases (eight active, 1,513 resolved, 65 deaths).

There was one new case Monday. The rate of active cases is 0.82 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been five new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,346 confirmed cases (183 active, 1,143 resolved, 20 deaths).

There were two new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 23.42 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 82 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 12.

There were zero new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 2.56 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Quebec: 270,911 confirmed cases (11,504 active, 249,361 resolved, 10,046 deaths).

There were 853 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 134.16 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,438 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,063.

There were 15 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 220 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 31. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.37 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 117.16 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Ontario: 279,472 confirmed cases (14,331 active, 258,603 resolved, 6,538 deaths).

There were 1,265 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 97.26 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,292 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,327.

There were 33 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 314 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 45. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.3 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.37 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 30,289 confirmed cases (1,622 active, 27,817 resolved, 850 deaths).

There were 52 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 117.6 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 638 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 91.

There were four new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 18 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 61.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 25,574 confirmed cases (2,204 active, 23,029 resolved, 341 deaths).

There were 171 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 186.99 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,563 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 223.

There were two new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 35 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.42 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 28.93 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Alberta: 127,036 confirmed cases (6,196 active, 119,130 resolved, 1,710 deaths).

There were 269 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 140.12 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,473 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 353.

There was one new reported death Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 61 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is nine. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.2 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 38.67 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 70,952 confirmed cases (4,088 active, 65,605 resolved, 1,259 deaths).

There were 1,236 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 79.41 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,015 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 431.

There were 13 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 49 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is seven. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.14 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 24.46 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Yukon: 70 confirmed cases (zero active, 69 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 32 confirmed cases (one active, 31 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 299 confirmed cases (five active, 293 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 12.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Feb. 9, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Alberta’s COVID-19 economic relaunch plan: restaurants, bars reopen to indoor customers

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Feb 8th, 2021

Alberta restaurants can reopen Monday for in-person dining as part of the province’s four-step plan to reopen the economy.

Restaurants had been closed to in-person dining after a resurgence of COVID-19 late last year sent case numbers soaring.

Premier Jason Kenney says reduced case numbers have made it possible to ease some restrictions, but he has also criticized some restaurants for ignoring public health orders by opening their doors prematurely.

Fitness training can also resume but only for one-on-one workouts — individual workouts without a trainer are not permitted.

Sports and entertainment-related activities can resume in schools, and the province also said over the weekend that youth will be able to take part in lessons and practices for team-based minor sports and athletics, although games are still prohibited.

Indoor gatherings are still banned and outdoor get-togethers are capped at 10.

The plan has been criticized by some as too risky given there are more than 500 Albertans still in hospital with COVID-19 and more than 60 cases of two variant strains of the virus.

The two variants, originating in the United Kingdom and South Africa, are exponentially more contagious than the original strain and, if left unchecked, could quickly swamp hospitals.

The Edmonton Zone Medical Staff Association wants the staged reopening shelved given the uncertainty of the variants.

The Opposition NDP says the province has put small- and medium-sized businesses in a no-win situation by not providing supports they need to stay closed and pushing them to move forward with risky reopenings.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, chief medical officer of health, says the new strains are a concern, but adds more resources have been put in place to deal with them, including the capability of testing 300 positive cases a day for the variants.

As for the reopening, Hinshaw has said comparable provinces like British Columbia and Saskatchewan have similar per-capita COVID-19 rates with comparable economic measures.

There is a minimum three-week lag between stages to fully assess the impact on case rates. Both Hinshaw and Kenney have said if the reopening must be paused or rolled back, it will be.

The four-stage scenario is tied mainly to hospitalization rates. Stage 1 is moving ahead because there are fewer than 600 Albertans in hospital with COVID-19.

When fewer than 450 are hospitalized, there is to be a further easing of restrictions on hotels, retailers and conference centres. Right now, retailers are open at 15 per cent capacity.

If there are fewer than 300 COVID-19 patients in hospital, entertainment venues — including casinos, cinemas, theatres and art galleries — will be able to open and the 15 per cent capacity limit for faith-based services will be eased.

Large events such as indoor concerts, trade shows, and weddings are to get the green light when there are fewer than 150 hospital cases.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, Feb. 8, 2021

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Feb 8th, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Monday Feb. 8, 2021.

There are 804,260 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 804,260 confirmed cases (44,727 active, 738,766 resolved, 20,767 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 3,203 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 117.69 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 24,407 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,487.

There were 65 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 735 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 105. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.28 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 54.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 416 confirmed cases (19 active, 393 resolved, four deaths).

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 3.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been eight new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 113 confirmed cases (three active, 110 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 1.88 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,585 confirmed cases (eight active, 1,512 resolved, 65 deaths).

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 0.82 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been five new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,344 confirmed cases (204 active, 1,120 resolved, 20 deaths).

There were seven new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 26.1 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 88 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 13.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 2.56 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Quebec: 270,058 confirmed cases (11,915 active, 248,112 resolved, 10,031 deaths).

There were 1,081 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 138.96 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,475 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,068.

There were 32 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 237 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 34. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.39 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 116.99 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Ontario: 278,207 confirmed cases (14,799 active, 256,903 resolved, 6,505 deaths).

There were 1,489 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 100.44 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,996 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,428.

There were 22 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 317 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 45. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.31 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 30,237 confirmed cases (3,256 active, 26,135 resolved, 846 deaths).

There were 79 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 236.07 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 673 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 96.

There were four new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 17 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.18 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 61.34 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 25,403 confirmed cases (2,363 active, 22,701 resolved, 339 deaths).

There were 194 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 200.48 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,539 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 220.

There were three new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 35 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.42 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 28.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Alberta: 126,767 confirmed cases (6,242 active, 118,816 resolved, 1,709 deaths).

There were 351 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 141.16 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,559 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 366.

There were four new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 70 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.23 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 38.65 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 69,716 confirmed cases (5,903 active, 62,567 resolved, 1,246 deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 114.67 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,056 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 294.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 57 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is eight. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.16 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 24.2 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Yukon: 70 confirmed cases (zero active, 69 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 32 confirmed cases (one active, 31 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 299 confirmed cases (14 active, 284 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 35.58 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of five new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been zero tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Feb. 8, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Quebec reopens non-essential stores, salons and museums as COVID-19 restrictions ease

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Feb 8th, 2021

Non-essential stores, personal care salons and museums across Quebec will allowed to reopen Monday as the province eases some of the restrictions put in place to control the spread of COVID-19.

The province is also allowing universities and junior colleges to begin to gradually reopen their campuses to allow students to attend in-person classes and activities a few times a month.

But while the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations has dropped in recent weeks, the government says it’s still too early to remove measures such as a nighttime curfew.

Six of the province’s less-populated regions are moving to the lower orange-alert level, allowing their residents to eat inside restaurant dining rooms, work out at gyms and stay out until 9:30 p.m., instead of 8 p.m. like the rest of the province.

The province is also allowing people across the province to participate in outdoor activities with people outside their households.

Residents will be able to meet outside with up to three people from other households, while in orange zones, the limit will be increased to eight.

Indoor gatherings are still prohibited, and bars remain closed. The government is also ordering anyone who can work from home to do so.

Restaurants in orange zones will only be allowed to seat two adults and their children at each table, and reservations will be mandatory to facilitate contact tracing and to prevent people from outside the region from visiting them.

Men have vanished on Vancouver Island. What happened to them?

THE BIG STORY | posted Friday, Feb 5th, 2021

In today’s Big Story podcast, over the past several years, vulnerable men have been disappearing from communities around Vancouver Island. They walk away, and then they are never seen again. Are they running? Have they gotten lost, and perished in the woods? Is there something more sinister happening? The host of Island Crime: Gone Boys, which launches on Monday, has spent months investigating the case, speaking to the families, authorities and experts in criminology. What did she find? What happens next?

GUEST: Laura Palmer, host of Island Crime (You can hear the trailer and subscribe for free to S2 of Island Crime right here.)

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

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